Tag Archives: LaGuardia Airport

Queens Morning Roundup


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

morning roundup

TODAY’S FORECAST

Monday: Sun and clouds mixed. High 68. Winds S at 20 to 30 mph. Monday night: Cloudy skies early then becoming foggy with periods of light rain late. Low near 55F. Winds S at 20 to 30 mph. Chance of rain 70%.

EVENT OF THE DAY: The LEGO Movie

Presented in Dolby Digital 3-D, this is an eye-popping, witty, fast-paced, and inventive stop-motion animated feature about Emmet, a rules-following, perfectly average LEGO mini-figure who is mistakenly identified as the “most special, most interesting, most extraordinary person” and the key to saving the world. Monday, April 14 – Friday, April 18, 1 p.m. daily at the Museum of the Moving Image. Click here for more info or to submit an event of your own

Fallen NYPD Officer, killed in Brooklyn fire, to be mourned at funeral today

A police officer who died last week after rushing into a burning building will be mourned Monday at his funeral. Read more: NBC New York

Flight to Nashville makes emergency landing at LaGuardia Airport

An American Eagle flight from LaGuardia to Nashville had to make an emergency landing on Sunday evening shortly after takeoff. Read more: ABC New York

Schumer: Afghanistan, Iraq War veterans deserve NYC parade

Sen. Charles Schumer is proposing a New York City homecoming parade for troops returning from the Afghanistan and Iraq wars. Read more: CBS New York/AP

Churchgoers nabbed two alleged thieves during Sunday services

Churchgoers nabbed two young men allegedly breaking the eighth commandment at Palm Sunday services in Flushing yesterday, witnesses said. Read more: New York Post

EXCLUSIVE: NYC will spend $10M to raise salaries for pre-K teachers at community-based organizations

The city will spend $10 million this year to boost the salaries of prekindergarten teachers working at community-based organizations to attract and retain qualified instructors. Read more: New York Daily News 

 

FBI seeking Delta Air Lines laser attack suspect from Elmhurst


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Liam La Guerre

Follow me @liamlaguerre


The FBI is seeking help to identify the perpetrator behind a laser attack, which caused flash blindness and disrupted the vision of a Delta Air Lines pilot on Tuesday.

As the plane was approaching LaGuardia Airport to land just before 8 p.m., a green beam that came from Queens Boulevard in Elmhurst entered the cockpit twice, the FBI said.

The injured pilot continued to experience pain in his right eye for a while after the attacks.

“Laser incidents are often viewed as harmless. This couldn’t be further from the truth,” FBI Assistant Director in Charge George Venizelos said. “Our paramount concern is the safety of aircraft passengers, and we are asking anyone who knows anything to contact us.”

There have been various laser attacks that caused injury in pilots recently.

On January 25, a beam that originated from Staten Island blinded a United Airlines pilot as the flight was approaching LaGuardia Airport.

In another incident on December 26, 2013, a JetBlue pilot experience blurry vision for more than a week after being blinded by a laser while approaching JFK Airport.

Laser beam strikes targeting in-bound planes have increased 39 percent in the city, the FBI said recently. The number of incidents jumped to 99 in 2013 from 71 in 2012.

Anyone with information is asked to call the FBI at 212-384-1000. A $10,000 reward is available for information that leads to the arrest of anyone involved in these incidents. Tipsters may remain anonymous.

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Gov. announces measures to address Queens plane noise


| mchan@queenscourier.com

File photo

The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey will double its sound monitors and create an office to address soaring noise complaints, under a string of new orders announced by Governor Andrew Cuomo Monday.

“Airport noise is rightly an important concern for residents of Queens, the Bronx and Nassau County,” Cuomo said. “We will listen to local residents and ensure their input is used to make both JFK and LaGuardia airports better neighbors.”

Gripes have been pouring in since the Federal Aviation Administration approved a new flight pattern in 2012 that brought on a barrage of low-flying planes over parts of northeast Queens.

“There have been days I felt so hopeless,” said Susan Carroll, of Flushing. “I get the takeoff. I get the landing. Flushing never gets a break from the airplane noise. We never get any peace.”

Carroll said she lodges so many complaints with the Port Authority’s hotline — at least one a day, since last summer — operators mistake her for an aviation expert.

“I actually cried tears of joy when I heard the news,” she said. “This is tremendous for all of us.”

Within the next few months, the Port Authority will implement a series of new measures that include monitoring flight tracks online, establishing regular roundtables with elected and federal officials, and conducting extensive noise studies.

More portable noise monitors will be placed in communities currently without one, the governor said. And the new noise office’s seven-member staff will collect and review data while responding to community complaints.

“We are committed to working with all communities we operate in to address their concerns, while bringing JFK and LaGuardia airports into the 21st century and maintaining the viability of our airports as major economic engines for the metropolitan region,” Port Authority Executive Director Pat Foye said.

 

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Renderings show potential vision for LaGuardia Airport’s future


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Renderings courtesy of Global Gateway Alliance

Though it has faced recent criticism for its outdated look, LaGuardia Airport’s future appears to be modern and functional.

Advocacy group Global Gateway Alliance has released renderings, created by design firm Neoscape, showcasing its vision for the airport’s main terminal, which is slated to get a facelift.

“This comprehensive vision integrates a modern, efficient and innovative design, including the striking all-glass façade, into LaGuardia’s outdated main terminal said Joseph Sitt, founder and chairman of Global Gateway Alliance. “It maximizes the area’s significant space constraints while seamlessly connecting passengers to the city.”

Global Gateway Alliance hopes that by releasing the renderings it will generate excitement for the project and those bidding on the project, will take their ideas into consideration, a spokesperson for the group said.

The newly-designed terminal needs to feature easy access to transportation, including a bus rapid transit stop in front, and a play area, the spokesperson added.

In 2012, the Port Authority of New York & New Jersey announced a $3.6 billion makeover for the airport. The terminal, built in 1964, is set to undergo a series of developments over the next six to 10 years.

Governor Andrew Cuomo, in his State of the State address, this January, said the borough’s airports were in need of care, particularly LaGuardia, which he said was ranked as the worst airport in the country.

Cuomo proposed modernizing LaGuardia and John F. Kennedy International airports by having the state assume management responsibility from the Port Authority.

He is not alone in his negative assessment of the airport.

Vice President Joe Biden, while speaking about infrastructure in Philadelphia last month, said LaGuardia Airport was similar to a “third world country.”

 

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FBI: Laser beam strikes targeting planes increase in NYC airports


| mchan@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/File photo

A crime that can temporarily blind airplane pilots and put air passengers at risk is spiking in New York City airports, authorities said.

Laser beam strikes targeting in-bound planes have increased 39 percent in the city, the FBI said. The number of incidents jumped to 99 in 2013 from 71 in 2012.

Authorities believe youngsters on top of residential roofs are aiming the powerful light beams at airplane cockpits as a prank.

“Laser incidents are often viewed as harmless acts. This couldn’t be further from the truth,” said FBI Assistant Director in Charge George Venizelos. “A laser pointed at a plane’s cockpit could blind a pilot and down an aircraft.”

At least 35 pilots have been injured by laser strikes since last December, the FBI said.

In one instance, a JetBlue pilot flying into John F. Kennedy International Airport last December was temporarily blinded for more than a week, the bureau said.

The federal agency is offering up to $10,000 for information that leads to an arrest and is hoping its regional awareness campaign deters the felony, which is punishable by five years in jail.

“It is important that people understand that this is a criminal act with potentially deadly repercussions,” said Ron Hosko, assistant director of the FBI’s Criminal Investigative Division.

The pointers can be easily and legally purchased, authorities said, and the beams can travel further than one mile.

Anyone with information is asked to call the FBI at 212-384-1000.

 

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Queens’ Morning Roundup


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

morning roundup

TODAY’S FORECAST

Tuesday: Cloudy with rain and snow this morning becoming foggy with light rain for the afternoon. High near 40. Winds S at 10 to 20 mph. Chance of rain 70%. Snow accumulations less than one inch. Tuesday night: A few passing clouds. Low 29. Winds WSW at 10 to 20 mph.

EVENT OF THE DAY: NYC Compost Project hosted by Queens Botanical Garden: I Heart Worms for Families

Did you know that worms have five pairs of hearts? This unique hands-on workshop introduces kids (ages 5 and up, accompanied by an adult) to the life of indoor composting (red wiggler) worms! Make heart-shaped compost cookies for your plants; be prepared to get your hands dirty! Registration required—compost@queensbotanical.org. Starts at 3 p.m. Click here for more info or to submit an event of your own

New York vows to remove registered sex offenders from housing near schools

The State of New York has vowed to fix a troubling issue. Convicted pedophiles have been housed near city schools in violation of a state law. Read more: CBS New York

Trash, ice line New York City streets as snow falls

New York City has suspended alternate-side parking through the weekend due to solid ice and uncollected trash that line the streets, all while nuisance snow falls across the region Tuesday. Read more: ABC New York

New York City teachers union president proclaims back pay is ‘a big issue’

The head of New York City’s teachers union made it clear Monday for the first time that he was pushing the city for back pay for his nearly 100,000 members. Read more: New York Daily News 

Passengers trapped on tarmac after fuel truck hits police cruiser at LaGuardia

Hundreds of passengers were reportedly trapped on the tarmac at LaGuardia Airport on Monday night. Read more: CBS New York

Bratton was kept in dark the night de Blasio’s buddy was sprung

Police Commissioner Bill Bratton was kept in the dark when Mayor de Blasio made a late-night call to an NYPD honcho on behalf of a political ally who’d been busted, sources told The Post. Read more: New York Post

 

De-icing vehicle hits plane at LaGuardia Airport


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Liam La Guerre

A de-icing vehicle struck a Delta Air Lines plane as it was about to take off at LaGuardia Airport Saturday night, according to published reports.

The flight to Orlando, Fla, with 149 passengers and crew on board, was on the runway about 6:30 p.m. when it was hit, reports said.

No one on the plane was injured in the accident, according to ABC New York and Fox 5. The flight was delayed about 90 minutes.

 

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Rookie Port Authority police officers save 71-year-old woman at LaGuardia Airport


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Photo Courtesy of the Port Authority of New York & New Jersey

Just one month out of the Port Authority Police Department Academy, Officers Lenny Guzman and William Mudry put their newly learned skills to the test while saving a life Monday.

A 71-year-old woman collapsed to the floor on the lower level of United Airlines in the Central Terminal Building at LaGuardia Airport around 2:10 p.m. on Feb. 10, according to the Port Authority of New York & New Jersey.  She didn’t have a pulse and was not breathing. Guzman and Mudry responded to the scene and began performing CPR.

The officers then used an automated external defibrillator, to which the victim responded to after a second application. She was then transported to Elmhurst Hospital, where she is currently recovering, the Port Authority said.

“The equipment and training used by these officers today illustrate the value of both to the traveling public,” said Joe Pentangelo, a Port Authority spokesperson.

 

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Mayor de Blasio calls Biden LaGuardia comments ‘inappropriate’


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

File photo

Mayor de Blasio, responding to comments Vice President Joe Biden made a day earlier comparing LaGuardia Airport to a third world country, called his words “inappropriate.”

It was not his  “finest moment,” the mayor said, answering reporters’ questions at a press conference Friday.

“LaGuardia obviously needs an upgrade, but that being said, the airport manages an extraordinary amount of traffic and the people who work there make it work under very difficult circumstances,” he said.

Vice President Joe Biden made the remarks while reportedly speaking about infrastructure in Philadelphia Thursday at an event to unveil Amtrak’s newest engine.

“If you blindfolded someone and took them at two o’clock in the morning into the airport in Hong Kong and said where do you think you are, they’d say, ‘this must be in America, this is a modern airport,’” Biden said. “If I took you in blindfolded and took you to LaGuardia Airport in New York, you must think, ‘I must be in some third world country.’ I’m not joking!”

Governor Andrew Cuomo, in his State of the State address this January, said the borough’s airports were in need of care, particularly LaGuardia, which he said was ranked as the worst airport in the country.

Cuomo proposed modernizing LaGuardia and John F. Kennedy International airports by having the state assume management responsibility from The Port Authority of New York & New Jersey.

 

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Vice President Biden says LaGuardia Airport is like ‘third world country’


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Screenshot via YouTube/ PoliticsNoww·

Vice President Joe Biden, while reportedly speaking about infrastructure in Philadelphia Thursday, said LaGuardia Airport was similar to a “third world country.”

“If you blindfolded someone and took them at two o’clock in the morning into the airport in Hong Kong and said where do you think you are, they’d say, ‘this must be in America, this is a modern airport,’” Biden said. “If I took you in blindfolded and took you to LaGuardia Airport in New York, you must think, ‘I must be in some third world country.’ I’m not joking!”

Biden was at the Pennsylvania event to unveil Amtrak’s newest engine, according to AP.

Governor Andrew Cuomo, in his State of the State address this January, said the borough’s airports were in need of care, particularly LaGuardia, which he said was ranked as the worst airport in the country.

Cuomo proposed modernizing LaGuardia and John F. Kennedy International airports by having the state assume management responsibility from The Port Authority of New York & New Jersey.

 

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Port Authority orders airlines to raise wages, give paid holiday to airport workers


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/ File Photo

Airport workers have won a battle for justice.

Port Authority of New York & New Jersey Director Patrick Foye has ordered the CEOs of Delta, JetBlue, American and United airlines to immediately raise wages and make Martin Luther King Jr. Day a paid holiday for the 8,000 contracted workers at John F. Kennedy International and LaGuardia airports.

Foye sent a letter to the four CEOs telling them to grant an immediate $1 an hour raise to workers making $9 or less, recognize Martin Luther King Jr. Day as a paid holiday and work towards “providing an improved wage and benefits package to the thousands of hard-working men and women at the airports.”

The announcement comes a week after close to 1,000 workers, elected officials and clergy members blocked a bridge leading to LaGuardia Airport on Martin Luther King Jr. Day during an act of civil disobedience demanding “economic justice.”

“Pat Foye’s letter is a promising step forward and marks the first real progress we have made in lifting thousands of contracted airport workers out of poverty,” said Hector Figueroa, president of SEIU 32 BJ, a union representing most of the airport workers. “We have gotten to this point due to the courage of the contracted airport workers and their willingness to take action – including being arrested for civil disobedience at LaGuardia Airport on MLK Day along with Congressmember Charles Rangel and many others.”

During the day of civil disobedience, more than 30 people were arrested, including city and state elected officials, and workers.

“It’s good that someone is finally listening to us and responding,” said Wendy Arellano, a LaGuardia Airport cabin cleaner. “This is a good plan. It’ll be better when we have good benefits, security and the peace of mind that a good contract gives you. But, for now, getting us up to 10 dollars and 10 cents is a real start.”

Figueroa said that the work will still continue to “bring contracted airport workers the dignity and respect they deserve,” and also help these workers get out of the path to poverty and succeed in gaining economic justice.

 

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32 arrested during civil disobedience at LaGuardia Airport as workers call for better treatment


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Katelyn Di Salvo

BY KATELYN DI SALVO

Wendy Arellano, a single mother of two from Corona, holds three jobs to try to make it through the months. She makes $8 an hour working at LaGuardia Airport and has now stood up to make her voice heard.

Arellano, together with close to 1,000 other airport employees, local elected officials and community leaders gathered on Martin Luther King Day at LaGuardia Airport to demand better rights and benefits for airport workers and express the struggle of bringing “dignity, fairness and economic justice to the contracted employees.”

In December, workers presented the Port Authority of New York & New Jersey, with petitions signed by more than 2,000 workers at LaGuardia, John F. Kennedy and Newark airports demanding Martin Luther King Day 2014 as a paid holiday. When they did not hear back from the Port Authority the workers and many people involved in the SEIU 32 BJ, a union representing most of the airport workers, they decided to organize Monday’s civil disobedience.

The rally opened with a prayer, and workers shared the stage to tell their stories and hardships.

“Personally I think it’s sad, I work three jobs to get through the months and even years, I don’t think what I make is enough for anyone to get by, and I hope this has gotten to the ears of the Port Authority,” Arellano said.

Juan Chapman who also works for LaGuardia Airport, shared his story as a security guard making $8 an hour and shouted many of his co-workers make less plus zero benefits.

“When people ask me how I live in New York on that salary I don’t have an answer, because there is no way someone can survive making $8 or less an hour,” he said.

Andrew Lloyd, a cabin cleaner at JFK International Airport shared his feelings of anger.

“I have a full time job, and I am on public assistance,” said Lloyd. “I find that to be ridiculous that I am working so hard, working overtime, and I still need public assistance, I have no health insurance, no sick days, no paid vacation days and I’m here to say I’m tired, we need respect.”

Many federal, state and local elected officials and clergy members also joined the rally standing side by side with workers.

“We have to make certain that there is a livable wage for people, no one should be one pay check away from homelessness,” said Congressmember Charles Rangel, who took the stage in support.

Rangel also said he is confident that Mayor Bill de Blasio, Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer, and President Barack Obama will bring equality to these workers.

Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito also announced her support of the fight for equality among workers.

“The thousands of New York area airport workers who have no health insurance, paid sick leave or the right to organize deserve better for their tireless work,” Mark-Viverito said. “Millions of New Yorkers pass through our airports every year and it’s the hard work and dedication of the workers who help make that possible. It’s time to take care of the workers who help New York City maintain its position as an international gateway.”

After the speeches, Hector Figueroa, President of SEIU 32 BJ, led the march to the 94th Street and Ditmars Boulevard bridge leading to LaGuardia Airport.

“We are here to honor Dr. King, and what better way to celebrate his legacy than doing the work of justice for workers that he carried on until he gave his life,” said Figueroa.

As workers marched through the streets they chanted “MLK is our day” as police surrounded them and warned them to clear the streets. Workers and members of SEIU 32 BJ sat down on the street in the middle of the bridge to make their statement clear.

Police then started arresting various people who would not clear the streets, ultimately arresting 32 people including local councilmembers Jimmy Van Bramer, Daneek Miller and Ruben Wills.

Those arrested were taken to the 115th Precinct, given summonses and released later in the day.

The workers and members of SEIU 32 BJ said they will not stop until “they get respect and equality.”

The Port Authority of New York & New Jersey did not respond to request for comment as of press time.

 

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Convention center and 25-story hotel headed for Corona


| mchan@queenscourier.com

Renderings courtesy of Fleet Financial Group

A convention center complex as big as a city block, with a 25-story hotel and apartments, may be coming to Queens. 

Fleet Financial Group plans to build a roughly 106,000-square-foot convention center, the largest in the East Coast, at 112-21 Northern Blvd. in Corona.

The $200 million real estate project also includes 292 river-view hotel rooms, 236 luxurious apartments, a shopping center and a high-class restaurant.

“That area is really booming. It’s going to be great for Queens,” said Fleet president Richard Xia.

The site is near Citi Field, where a major $3 billion redevelopment project, including a mega mall, is slated for Willets Point. It is also by the Grand Central Parkway, about two miles from LaGuardia Airport.

“People pass by, but they never stop here,” said Xia, who lives and works in Flushing. “It’s going to be something that will create a lot of jobs and, in the meantime, bring a lot more business activity to Queens.”

Fleet purchased the 1.67-acre property — currently the site of the DiBlasi Ford dealership — last month for $17 million, according to Xia.

The company is also in the midst of completing an 18-story Westin Element hotel, with a medical center, at 42-31 Union St. in Flushing.

Construction of the massive complex in Corona, dubbed the Eastern Emerald Center, would create nearly 3,000 jobs, Xia said.

Work is expected to start this June and end in 2017, though the proposal still needs approval from Community Board 3, the Queens borough president and the city.

The project has support from Queens Economic Development Corp. Executive Director Seth Bornstein and Queens Chamber of Commerce President Al Pennisi.

“It sounds like a really good idea,” Bornstein said. “We lack quality, large-scale space for events. It would really be a benefit to the borough.”

Pennisi said the city “could use more than one” facility like the Javits Center in Manhattan.

“[The Chamber] thought of this project,” Pennisi said. “It’ll bring conventions of all sizes into a modern facility. Everybody will benefit from it.”

Councilmember Julissa Ferreras and Victor Rodriguez, a Corona resident who owns a mini market near the proposed complex, hope the development will be a boon for the neighborhood.

“I think it’s good for us,” Rodriguez said. “It’ll bring more people here.”

But a local educator, who did not want to be named, said the slated site is near too many schools on an already accident-prone portion of Northern Boulevard.

“To have something of that magnitude, and all these people coming to town, I can’t see how that improves anything,” she said. “Money is good and people need jobs, but there are so many other things not fixed as is.”

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Op-ed: Making Silent Skies a reality


| oped@queenscourier.com

CONGRESSMEMBER JOSEPH CROWLEY

Anyone who lives here in Queens can tell you just how loud and disruptive the noise of airplanes can be. Millions of Americans throughout the country, including those who live in the communities surrounding LaGuardia and JFK Airports are impacted by constant, thunderous engine noise all day long. The sound isn’t merely a nuisance – it disrupts sleep, distracts students in our community’s schools and drowns out the joys of daily life.

The problem of excessive noise from airplanes flying over our communities has always been a hard nut to crack. Planes usually have a limited number of options for approaching and departing from runways. These flight paths can change based on many varying conditions in weather, winds and congestion. Especially in the crowded skies over our densely-populated city, there are precious few places airplanes can fly where they won’t be heard by some community.

But there’s one way to resolve this problem to the benefit of all our communities: make airplanes quieter.

In 2006, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issued regulations requiring all new aircraft designs to meet Stage 4 noise standards, which is a considerably lower decibel level than those currently in use. While these new rules were a significant step toward improving the quality of life for those who live near airports, they did not go far enough. The FAA did nothing to make sure airlines would begin to phase out older, louder airplanes or retrofit them with quieter engines.

Last week, I introduced legislation to fix that.

My bill, the Silent Skies Act, will require airlines to begin stocking their fleets with newer, quieter aircraft. In order to introduce quieter planes into the market, the bill mandates that the FAA issue regulations by the end of 2015 forcing airlines to begin updating their fleets to meet Stage 4 noise standards. Fleets will have to be updated at a rate of 25 percent every five years, so that all commercial airplanes meet these quieter standards by no later than 2035.

But, we can’t stop there. We can’t just phase out today’s noisy planes and call it quits. We must push the envelope and try to develop technologies that make airplanes even quieter.

That’s why the Silent Skies Act will also create a fund to encourage research and development into these technologies. It will allow the FAA issue up to $10 million in grants for developing better ways to help meet or exceed Stage 4 noise standards. In return, companies that benefit from the program will be asked to pay the money back, using the profits they made on their new engines.

When talking with my constituents about aircraft noise pollution in our communities, I always say our airports will never be perfect neighbors, but we can certainly make them better ones. The truth is our airports are only getting busier. New York will continue to be a destination for more and more people. And that’s a good thing for our local economy. But, that doesn’t mean our communities need to sacrifice their quality of life.

The Silent Skies Act is just the kind of approach we can take to make life better not just for the residents of Queens, but also for so many other communities near airports around the country.

Crowley represents New York’s 14th Congressional District, stretching from Pelham Bay to Elmhurst.

 

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Pols introduce bill in Congress to alleviate airplane noise


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/ Photo by Angy Altamirano

The skies over Queens and the rest of the country may soon be quieter.

Congressmember Joe Crowley gathered with state and local elected officials, advocates and community members Friday to announce the introduction of the Silent Skies Act bill that will work to alleviate airplane noise pollution in neighborhoods surrounding LaGuardia and John F. Kennedy International airports.

The new legislation will require the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to implement regulations by the end of 2015 demanding commercial aircrafts to go from Stage 3 noise standards to Stage 4 noise standards, reducing the sound by 10 decibels.

“Airports can never be perfect neighbors, but we can take steps to make them better neighbors,” said Crowley. “While commercial aircraft can never be truly silent, we can make sure they are less disruptive to the families who live nearby and improve the quality of life in our communities, not just here in Queens but throughout the country.”

Advocates for the reduction of airplane noise say the loud engines disrupt sleep, distract students and drown out the noise of everyday life.

Although the FAA issued regulations that required all new commercial aircraft designs to meet these new noise standards, the new introduced legislation would also have the FAA phase out older and louder aircraft.

The Silent Skies Act will now require the FAA to bring in quieter engines at a rate of 25 percent of an airline’s planes every five years, with all commercial airlines meeting the new noise standards by 2035.

“Recent changes in flight procedures have caused constant, intolerable noise in wide area of our New York/New Jersey metro area,” said Janet McEneaney, president of Queens Quiet Skies. “For too long, the interests of residents here were not considered when aviation procedures were planned.”

The new bill, if passed, would also encourage the research and development of quieter engine technologies through authorizing a new grant program.

“It’s time for our needs to be considered,” said McEneaney. “We remind you the skies belong to all of us, not just some of us.”

Hundreds of residents in northeast Queens have pushed for noise control after the FAA approved a new flight pattern last December that brought on a large amount of low-flying planes over their neighborhoods.

“Silent skies should not just be for first class passengers,” said Crowley.

The FAA said it does not comment on proposed legislation.

The number of people in the United States who are open to significant aircraft noise has dropped by 90 percent since 1975, according to the FAA. This decrease is due to mainly reductions in aircraft noise and phase-outs of older, noisier aircraft.

 

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