Tag Archives: Jeffrey Gitomer

Measuring the ROI of social media? There’s a laugh, and a joke


| editorial@queenscourier.com

By Jeffrey Gitomer

I got an (unsolicited) email offering a webinar to teach me about how to measure, and the importance of measuring, the ROI of social media.

TOTAL JOKE. And a bad one at that.

Social media, business social media, is running wild – with or without you. Your customers and prospective customers are posting on Facebook whether you have the balls to have presence there or not.

And I am not just talking to companies – I am talking to YOU – the individual.

CONSIDER THIS: Of all the grassroots revolutions that have occurred on social media, none of them were started by companies or a governments. They were all started by people – people who were excited, people who were afraid, people who were pissed, and people who wanted change and spoke up. They spoke over CEOs, media, newspapers, government, lobbyists, and politicians.

HERE’S WHAT THEY SHOULD MEASURE: LRI otherwise known as Lost Revenue (and goodwill and customer loyalty) of Idiots.

While Macy’s and most other department stores are/were measuring ROI, Zappos is cleaning their clock, delivering value, connecting with and responding to customers one on one, and building a billion dollar empire in less time than it took Macy’s to expand to a second store 100 years ago.

Webinars on the subject of ROI of social media are likely run by the same people who thought Amazon.com wouldn’t make it. If Bezos measured the ROI at Amazon in the first five years, he would have quit. He accomplished domination while Barnes & Noble was measuring ROI, and Borders was going broke.

Amazon now has total market dominance based on leadership, vision, and technological excellence. Same with Apple. Microsoft used to laugh at them, now their employees all have iPads and iPods at home.

Measure? No, INVEST RESOURCES IN SOCIAL MEDIA WITHOUT MEASURING. NOW!

It’s way too soon to measure.

MAJOR POINT OF UNDERSTANDING: If they had measured the ROI of TV, or the computer, or the automobile, or the telephone, or the Internet after 5 years, NOBODY would have gotten involved, and we’d be in a technological bog – sinking.

Wake up and smell the opportunity!

People guarding nickels have no idea of the power or the value of business social media, much less social media. They have no idea of the lost opportunity, or the lost revenue. They have no idea of the perception and participation of customers.

My bet is people who measure the ROI of social media HAVE NEVER TWEETED. Wanna take that bet?

I define these people as the ones who still have a small rubber circle in the middle of their keyboard – completely out of touch with what’s new, and trying to prevent the unstoppable force of progress, and customers.

Wanna know who else “measured” financial return?

Blockbuster measured online movie services.

BlackBerry measured smartphones.

Microsoft measured music players.

Billion-dollar MIS-MEASUREMENT: Bank of America DIDN’T measure or understand the power of Facebook. They were greedily measuring increased revenue from debit card customers. Their billion dollar loss paled in comparison to their complete loss of goodwill. I doubt they will recover in a decade.

All of those companies are/were foolish.

There’s one company you want to take their time, measure nickels, rely on lawyers, and stick their big toe in the water before getting involved – that one company is your biggest competitor.

Here’s an easy plan to get rolling in a week or two:

1. Gather the email addresses of EVERYONE in your world.

2. Create a first-class, well tagged with key words, business page on Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter.

3. Start a YouTube channel by inviting your customers to film WHY they bought from you.

4. Map out a strategy, and goals for engagement, for Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

5. Assign someone to monitor, post, and RESPOND to all who engage.

6. Create six value-based messages, two each for Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter.

7. Shoot 2-3 value-based (something your customers could use) videos and post them on YouTube.

8. Invite all of your customers to join you by sending examples of your value messages. I recommend one campaign per media for four weeks – but have links to all in each email.

9. Post something every day on Facebook. Tweet something every day. Link with 2-5 people every day. Post one video a week.

10. If you really want to create some buzz, convert your contacts to Ace of Sales (www.aceofsales.com) – and send emails that differentiate yourself from the competition.

10.5 Only listen to your lawyer if they tell you what you CAN do.

Jeffrey Gitomer is the author of The Sales Bible, Customer Satisfaction is Worthless Customer Loyalty is Priceless, The Little Red Book of Selling, The Little Red Book of Sales Answers, The Little Black Book of Connections, The Little Gold Book of YES! Attitude, The Little Green Book of Getting Your Way, The Little Platinum Book of Cha-Ching, The Little Teal Book of Trust, The Little Book of Leadership, and Social BOOM! His website, www.gitomer.com, will lead you to more information about training and seminars, or email him personally at salesman@gitomer.com.© 2012 All Rights Reserved. Don’t even think about reproducing this document without written permission from Jeffrey H. Gitomer and Buy Gitomer. 704/333-1112 

Measuring the ROI of social media? There’s a laugh, and a joke


| editorial@queenscourier.com

By Jeffrey Gitomer

I got an (unsolicited) email offering a webinar to teach me about how to measure, and the importance of measuring, the ROI of social media.

TOTAL JOKE. And a bad one at that.

Social media, business social media, is running wild – with or without you. Your customers and prospective customers are posting on Facebook whether you have the balls to have presence there or not.

And I am not just talking to companies – I am talking to YOU – the individual.

CONSIDER THIS: Of all the grassroots revolutions that have occurred on social media, none of them were started by companies or a governments. They were all started by people – people who were excited, people who were afraid, people who were pissed, and people who wanted change and spoke up. They spoke over CEOs, media, newspapers, government, lobbyists, and politicians.

HERE’S WHAT THEY SHOULD MEASURE: LRI otherwise known as Lost Revenue (and goodwill and customer loyalty) of Idiots.

While Macy’s and most other department stores are/were measuring ROI, Zappos is cleaning their clock, delivering value, connecting with and responding to customers one on one, and building a billion dollar empire in less time than it took Macy’s to expand to a second store 100 years ago.

Webinars on the subject of ROI of social media are likely run by the same people who thought Amazon.com wouldn’t make it. If Bezos measured the ROI at Amazon in the first five years, he would have quit. He accomplished domination while Barnes & Noble was measuring ROI, and Borders was going broke.

Amazon now has total market dominance based on leadership, vision, and technological excellence. Same with Apple. Microsoft used to laugh at them, now their employees all have iPads and iPods at home.

Measure? No, INVEST RESOURCES IN SOCIAL MEDIA WITHOUT MEASURING. NOW!

It’s way too soon to measure.

MAJOR POINT OF UNDERSTANDING: If they had measured the ROI of TV, or the computer, or the automobile, or the telephone, or the Internet after 5 years, NOBODY would have gotten involved, and we’d be in a technological bog – sinking.

Wake up and smell the opportunity!

People guarding nickels have no idea of the power or the value of business social media, much less social media. They have no idea of the lost opportunity, or the lost revenue. They have no idea of the perception and participation of customers.

My bet is people who measure the ROI of social media HAVE NEVER TWEETED. Wanna take that bet?

I define these people as the ones who still have a small rubber circle in the middle of their keyboard – completely out of touch with what’s new, and trying to prevent the unstoppable force of progress, and customers.

Wanna know who else “measured” financial return?

Blockbuster measured online movie services.

BlackBerry measured smartphones.

Microsoft measured music players.

Billion-dollar MIS-MEASUREMENT: Bank of America DIDN’T measure or understand the power of Facebook. They were greedily measuring increased revenue from debit card customers. Their billion dollar loss paled in comparison to their complete loss of goodwill. I doubt they will recover in a decade.

All of those companies are/were foolish.

There’s one company you want to take their time, measure nickels, rely on lawyers, and stick their big toe in the water before getting involved – that one company is your biggest competitor.

Here’s an easy plan to get rolling in a week or two:

1. Gather the email addresses of EVERYONE in your world.

2. Create a first-class, well tagged with key words, business page on Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter.

3. Start a YouTube channel by inviting your customers to film WHY they bought from you.

4. Map out a strategy, and goals for engagement, for Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and YouTube.

5. Assign someone to monitor, post, and RESPOND to all who engage.

6. Create six value-based messages, two each for Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter.

7. Shoot 2-3 value-based (something your customers could use) videos and post them on YouTube.

8. Invite all of your customers to join you by sending examples of your value messages. I recommend one campaign per media for four weeks – but have links to all in each email.

9. Post something every day on Facebook. Tweet something every day. Link with 2-5 people every day. Post one video a week.

10. If you really want to create some buzz, convert your contacts to Ace of Sales (www.aceofsales.com) – and send emails that differentiate yourself from the competition.

10.5 Only listen to your lawyer if they tell you what you CAN do.

Jeffrey Gitomer is the author of The Sales Bible, Customer Satisfaction is Worthless Customer Loyalty is Priceless, The Little Red Book of Selling, The Little Red Book of Sales Answers, The Little Black Book of Connections, The Little Gold Book of YES! Attitude, The Little Green Book of Getting Your Way, The Little Platinum Book of Cha-Ching, The Little Teal Book of Trust, The Little Book of Leadership, and Social BOOM! His website, www.gitomer.com, will lead you to more information about training and seminars, or email him personally at salesman@gitomer.com.© 2012 All Rights Reserved. Don’t even think about reproducing this document without written permission from Jeffrey H. Gitomer and Buy Gitomer. 704/333-1112

 

A celebration of consistency. A legacy of insight.


| editorial@queenscourier.com

By Jeffrey Gitomer

This is the 20th anniversary of my first column. Sales Moves first appeared in the Charlotte Business Journal on March 23, 1992. The column was an instant success. It soon found its way to Dallas, Atlanta, Denver, Philadelphia, and a bunch of other cities. My column has appeared in more than 250 publications.

Mark Ethridge, then-publisher of the Charlotte Business Journal, novelist, Pulitzer Prize winning journalist, and my good friend and supporter, said that publishing Sales Moves was his most impactful marketing decision of 1992.

It was the turning point in my career.

As a result of the column’s publication, people began to call from all over the country, and still do every day. Newspapers called wanting to publish the column. Readers called to thank me for helping them make sales. I found out that salespeople were hanging my weekly article on the wall in their offices. They were copying the column and passing it around. They were mailing it to friends and coworkers in other cities. They were using the column to lead sales meetings.

All of that occurred before the Internet. Times, and publishing strategies, have changed. Drastically. So have lots of sales strategies. This writing is strategic for you to understand what is NOW, and what you have to do to be prepared for NEXT.

Think about the early days of URL registration. What kind of fortune could you have made if you had jumped on it? Did you? Many people waited. Too long. How long did you wait? I was astute enough to get my family name, “Gitomer.com.” You?

I have been writing for 20 years. For that same amount of time, I have asked you to write with me. I know what writing does because I live the essence of it. In 1992 you had to rely on print media. Now, you’re your own publishing house. There’s no reason for your voice to be muted, and (through search engines and social media) it has every opportunity to be found.

If you’re old enough to have been in the working world 20 years ago, you have seen many evolutions: cell phone, computer, laptop, software, Internet, e-mail, wireless connection, the rise and fall of CompuServe and AOL, car phones (remember them?) and the rise of China to name a few.

The list below is not a “to do” list. It’s a “to understand” first and to make a (flexible) plan of action second list. To take consistent, deliberate actions to create your own success. These are imperatives for “the now” and the near future. Imperatives are not optional.

Here are the imperatives of success for 2012 – and the next 20 years:

1. THINK. Set aside time to understand and see the big picture, and how you fit into it. Alongside of your “to do” list, create a longer list of “to become.” That’s where thinking comes from. KEY POINT OF UNDERSTANDING: Document as you think. Don’t let thoughts and ideas escape. Ever.

2. ALLOCATE TIME. Time management is passé. Allocate productive use for each hour of the day. Time management is a waste of time, has no finite measurement, and is confusing. Time allocation says: there are 24 hours in the day. And asks: how will you invest each one of them? Once you realize you need an hour to make follow-ups, an hour to answer e-mails, an hour to do business social media, and so on – you now understand where your day goes. There is flexibility to go on appointments, attend meetings, and be with your family – but “allocation” is a word that resonates and a concept you can control.

3. ATTRACT. Getting customers to call you is the real key to convert selling to buying. Writing with valuable messages creates attraction (not sitting on a couch manifesting). NOTE WELL: Please don’t confuse this with “prospecting” or “cold calling” – those elements of selling are over. You repel with cold call sales messages that interrupt others. You attract with consistent value messages.

4. ENGAGE. The step after attract is engage. I got you here. Can I keep you here? Why would I want to read, or get involved, or buy? Those answers will lead you to sales. Maybe you need to ask the last ten people that bought.

5. CONNECT. I may buy, but it may be transactional. Is there any reason to stay connected with you? I don’t know your reasons, but I know mine. My customers (like you) want more now and next knowledge. My customers want stuff about them and their success. Yours?

Yikes! I’m out of space. To be continued with the rest of the now and soon imperatives. This full two-part article will be prominently displayed on my web site. Stay tuned – and thank you for your loyalty.

Jeffrey Gitomer is the author of The Sales Bible, Customer Satisfaction is Worthless Customer Loyalty is Priceless, The Little Red Book of Selling, The Little Red Book of Sales Answers, The Little Black Book of Connections, The Little Gold Book of YES! Attitude, The Little Green Book of Getting Your Way, The Little Platinum Book of Cha-Ching, The Little Teal Book of Trust, The Little Book of Leadership, and Social BOOM! His website, www.gitomer.com, will lead you to more information about training and seminars, or email him personally at salesman@gitomer.com.

 © 2012 All Rights Reserved. Don’t even think about reproducing this document

without written permission from Jeffrey H. Gitomer and Buy Gitomer. 704/333-1112

Are you a true believer or just a salesperson?


| editorial@queenscourier.com

What do you believe in?

What are your real beliefs?

I’m asking you these questions so you can have a clearer picture as to why sales are made or lost.

“Jeffrey, you don’t understand,” you whine. “Our customers are price buyers!” No Jackson, YOU don’t understand. You BELIEVE they’re price buyers, and until you change your belief, they will continue to be that way.

SIMPLE RULE: Change your beliefs and you can change your outcomes.

SIMPLER RULE: Your beliefs control your sales performance.

SIMPLEST RULE: You can strengthen your beliefs with clear thoughts and deep commitment.

THINK ABOUT THIS: As you’re preparing for a sale, your belief system is so powerful it will dominate your desire to get ready to win. Those beliefs have been present either consciously or subconsciously for as long as you have been employed by your present company – and they deepen with every sales call you make, every sale you achieve, and every sale you lose.

You may look at belief as “faith.” A common belief is, “I’ve lost faith in my company’s ability to deliver as promised.” Others are loss of faith in product, boss, ethics of company, or even the economy.

But your belief and your belief system are the root of your sales success, or the bane of your failure.

 There are five elements to belief, and in order to be a great salesperson you must be the master believer of all five. There’s also a .5 that enables you to change or strengthen your beliefs…

1. You have to believe you work for the greatest company in the world.

2. You have to believe your products and services are the greatest in the world.

3. You have to believe in yourself.

(NOTE: STOP here if the above three beliefs – company, products and services, and self – are not present and deep. The next two will be impossible to comprehend, let alone master…)

4. You have to believe in your ability to differentiate from your competition in a way that the customer PERCEIVES as BOTH different AND valuable. If the customer fails to perceive a difference between you and your competition, if they fail to perceive your value, then all that’s left is price.

5. BIGGEST ASPECT OF BELIEF: You must believe that the customer is BETTER OFF having purchased from you. Not just believing this in your head – rather, believing it in your heart.

5.5 You control your belief with your thoughts and your attitude. And this understanding is critical to building and maintaining a positive belief for all you say and do. Once this belief begins to falter, it’s time to go. Time to move on to something you believe in.

These 5.5 fundamental beliefs will drive your preparation, and thereby your presentation, to new heights, new sales, and new success.

Take a moment and rate yourself on a scale of 1-10 (10 being best) for each of the 5.5 elements above. If your total is less than 40, you’re losing sales due to lack of belief.

BEWARE: There are negative beliefs that will also limit your success, even if you possess the critical five.

• Belief your prices are too high.

• Belief your competition has a lock on the business you’re trying to get.

• Belief that the sale is a bidding process and you’ll lose without the lowest bid.

• Belief that the sale you’re in the middle of won’t happen.

…And about 20 more beliefs that are completely alterable.

GREAT NEWS: The deeper you possess the big five beliefs, the bigger and faster your sales cycle will end – with an order.

KEY POINT OF UNDERSTANDING: Belief does not come in a day – it comes day-by-day, slowly over time. But once achieved at its highest level, it’s virtually impenetrable – and it will put passion in your preparation, not to mention, money in your pocket.

Do you believe? I hope you do. Your success depends on it.

 

Jeffrey Gitomer is the author of The Sales Bible, Customer Satisfaction is Worthless Customer Loyalty is Priceless, The Little Red Book of Selling, The Little Red Book of Sales Answers, The Little Black Book of Connections, The Little Gold Book of YES! Attitude, The Little Green Book of Getting Your Way, The Little Platinum Book of Cha-Ching, The Little Teal Book of Trust, The Little Book of Leadership, and Social BOOM! His website, www.gitomer.com, will lead you to more information about training and seminars, or email him personally at salesman@gitomer.com.

 

© 2012 All Rights Reserved. Don’t even think about reproducing this document

without written permission from Jeffrey H. Gitomer and Buy Gitomer. 704/333-1112

Why are you fighting with procurement and purchasing?


| editorial@queenscourier.com

BY JEFFREY GITOMER

DISCLAIMER: The following article is a reality and a strategy, NOT defamation or a tactic.

THE CONCEPT: Why purchasing and procurement departments should be avoided, and how to do it.

THE REALITY: Purchasing and procurement are a way of life.

YOUR REALITY: Your total lack of C-level relationships makes your life a sell-from-the-bottom-up proposition.

HERE’S YOUR SELF-TEST:

• Are you relegated to “purchasing” as part of corporate policy?

• Are you prevented from talking to the person who actually uses the product you’re trying to sell?

• Are you making decisions as to how much profit you’re willing to sacrifice to secure the business?

• Are you bullied into “matching price” to get the order?

• Are you being TOLD what your price will be in order to “do business”?

Welcome to the club of losers. Not people, profit.

The purchasing department or the procurement department has one major job: To save their company money. Oh wait, let me complete that sentence as it relates to you: To save their company money, at your expense.

In general, when you deal with the procurement department and their people – keep in mind:

• They don’t care about quality.

• They don’t understand outcome.

• They don’t understand the need for service after the sale.

• They don’t understand productivity.

• They don’t care about morale.

• They don’t care about outcome.

• They don’t care about vendor relationships.

• They don’t care about vendor profitability.

• They don’t care about you.

• They NEVER look for the best, just the lowest price.

Procurement departments operate under the general principle of, and are measured and rewarded by: “We saved a nickel!” BUT the outcome of the “saved nickel” may be that everyone in the company is unhappy, the product is crappy and breaks down, and the service response is slow.

NOTE TO PURCHASING: It’s also likely the productivity, and low quality, and loss of morale, cost your company 500 times more than the nickel you saved.

There’s a “Rock, Paper, Scissors” game of business: CEO’s cover purchasing and procurement. If the CEO calls down to purchasing and says, “We’re going with ACME Widgets!” The procurement person says, “ACME boss? Okay boss!” And that’s it. No proposal, no bid, no price cutting, no “match this price.” No nothing. Just a purchase order.

NOTE WELL: This is only possible if you have a relationship with the CEO. Ouch.

ATTENTION PURCHASING: Here are a few recommendations that eliminate “lowest price” from the final decision:

1. Demand testimonials. Don’t just bid. Prove what you promise.

2. Create a “range of price” acceptance. If the price is within 10 percent of the lowest bid, the purchasing agent can (and should) choose what he or she believes is the BEST product or service.

3. Let your people test the product.

4. Let your people tell you what they want.

5. Let your people tell you who they want to do business with.

NOTE WELL: Independent third party purchasing groups should be TOTALLY avoided. The hotel industry is besieged by RFPs from bullying third party event planning companies that shield the customer, and only care about price. Hotels hate them, and are forced to eliminate most of their profit to book the event. And the ultimate customer loses respect, face, and is in total jeopardy of having a third rate event with a poor outcome. All in the name of “saving money.”

And “reverse auctions” are worse. They milk every cent of profit.

My two-word strategy for both of these is: “DON’T PARTICIPATE!” If no one played, they’d go away in a week.

The strategy to eliminate, or at least mitigate, the process of starting with purchasing, is to have a relationship with the person or people that direct them. You can be recommended and you can be the “standard” used for selection.

You can have a history of success at other companies based on quality, productivity, results, and profitability – and present proof of this as a price alternative.

You can have a social media presence that allows your customers to provide feedback.

You can write value-based articles that C-level people might read. This can get you in direct contact with decision makers.

NOTE WELL: These 750 words are not going to resolve the issue, and are certainly not going to eliminate the purchasing department. In most cases, purchasing and procurement are a vital part of any large company. The challenge I’m issuing is that it is NOT just a price decision. “Bidding” is a losing proposition. “Best” and “value” are the winners.

If you’re a purchasing agent and you personally need heart surgery or a hip replacement, do you want best, or lowest price? Best, or three bids?

Think about it.

Jeffrey Gitomer is the author of The Sales Bible, Customer Satisfaction is Worthless Customer Loyalty is Priceless, The Little Red Book of Selling, The Little Red Book of Sales Answers, The Little Black Book of Connections, The Little Gold Book of YES! Attitude, The Little Green Book of Getting Your Way, The Little Platinum Book of Cha-Ching, The Little Teal Book of Trust, The Little Book of Leadership, and Social BOOM! His website, www.gitomer.com, will lead you to more information about training and seminars, or email him personally at salesman@gitomer.com.


© 2012 All Rights Reserved. Don’t even think about reproducing this document

without written permission from Jeffrey H. Gitomer and Buy Gitomer. 704/333-1112 

Better than ‘goals’


| editorial@queenscourier.com

I am sick of goals and goal experts. You know, the people that spam you around the first of the year proclaiming they are the ones who can “help you” get to the next level. They have the magic “goal achievement formula.”

All you have to do to achieve your goals is pay the sender of the email.

I am not an expert at setting goals. Rather, I’m an achiever.

To me “goal” is the wrong word. It tells me there’s something I HOPE or SEEK to achieve. I think you should call them the “achievements I’m striving for, and intend to make happen.” Whoa! That sounds like a whole different (better) process.

The reason most goals are not met is simple: Starting with the goal is wrong. Making the goal is the middle of the process.

BIG PICTURE: BEFORE YOU MAKE A GOAL, YOU NEED INFORMATION, AND YOU NEED TO DEFINE YOUR OWN REALITY.

Here’s the achievement formula and process that will work…

Before you make a goal, first define and write down what’s happening in your life at this moment.

What is my present situation? Ask yourself (and write down the answers): What’s happening in my life? What’s happening in the lives of others that may affect me? What’s happening at my job and in my career? What’s going on in my family?

What is my present status? What are my skills? My capabilities? My shortcomings? What are the things I need to work on? What is my experience level? How’s my health? What’s my demeanor? How positive is my attitude?

What are my opportunities this year? What is available for me to grasp, accomplish, or achieve in both career and life? FYI: If you’re facing major change, maybe you should redefine it as opportunity. If you do, you’ll see the other side of the picture.

What are my objectives? What’s been on my mind to do? What do I want to make happen?

What are my needs? What do I “gotta do” whether I like it or not?

What are my desires? What do I really wanna do?

What are my intentions? Am I writing down a 20-year dream, or am I dedicating myself to the tasks necessary to get something achieved in a short space of (defined) time?

What are my beliefs? How strong do I believe in my company? My product? My service? Do I believe I can differentiate myself from others? Do I believe that my customer is better off purchasing from me?

 

Second, you write down what achievements you’d like to make:

What have I been thinking about? What are my dominant thoughts? What are my thoughts I’d like to turn into achievements?

What have I ALWAYS wanted to do?

What am I willing to do? If I make a goal, am I willing to actually do the work to make it happen?

What’s the time requirement? If I make a goal, do I have the time to achieve it? Am I willing to allocate the time?

What am I willing to sacrifice in order to achieve? (Give up bacon? Beer? TV?)

What are the barriers? What are the obstacles I’m facing? Can I overcome them alone or do I need help? If so, who?

What’s my level of dedication? What has been my history of achievement?

What’s my attitude toward doing? Am I “gung ho” or “ho hum”?

What’s my date to start? Pick a firm date. Document it.

What’s my plan of action? What do I need to do every day? What’s my “daily dose”?

What’s my expected date of achievement? Pick a firm date. Document it.

What’s my plan to celebrate? Where’s the party? When is the party? Who is coming?

What are my outcome expectations? What do I believe will happen AFTER achievement? How will that affect my life?

 

Get the picture?

There’s a heck of a lot that goes into the achievement process. Setting the goal is just one small part of it. That’s why I substitute the word goal for the word achievement.

You have ideas, you have dreams, you have aspirations, you have desires, and you have needs. And now you have a full-blown plan of understanding and attack. BUT the plan alone will not work without the secret ingredient: Your hard work.

In my years of achievement, hard work has always been my secret weapon. Make it yours.

 

Jeffrey Gitomer is the author of The Sales Bible, Customer Satisfaction is Worthless Customer Loyalty is Priceless, The Little Red Book of Selling, The Little Red Book of Sales Answers, The Little Black Book of Connections, The Little Gold Book of YES! Attitude, The Little Green Book of Getting Your Way, The Little Platinum Book of Cha-Ching, The Little Teal Book of Trust, The Little Book of Leadership, and Social BOOM! His website, www.gitomer.com, will lead you to more information about training and seminars, or email him personally at salesman@gitomer.com.


© 2012 All Rights Reserved. Don’t even think about reproducing this document

without written permission from Jeffrey H. Gitomer and Buy Gitomer. 704/333-1112

 

Getting training in order


| editorial@queenscourier.com

Many companies are considering training programs for the New Year.

New budgets. New needs. New opportunities.

And most companies will concentrate on “it.” Whatever it is. More sales, a new product launch, customer service, internal operations, diversity, or whatever is “pressing.”

All of that is wrong – or should I say, out of order.

Before you train ANYTHING, before you launch any new program or initiative, ask yourself these two questions:

1. How positive are the attitudes of our people?

2. How attitudinally receptive will our people be to this training?

If the answer to “How’s our attitude?” is “not too good” or “inconsistent” or “My attitude is great, it’s everyone else’s attitude that’s the problem,” then the training will be met with resistance, and will fall short of your expected outcome. Way short.

The answer to this dilemma is very simple, yet it’s overlooked at almost every company in the world: Train attitude first.Positive attitude. YES! Attitude.

Positive attitude is not a “program” or an “initiative.” It’s an imperative. It’s not the “flavor of the month.” It’s the feeling of and for a lifetime. Your lifetime.

Attitude is the mood of every employee.Positive attitude leads to positive productivity and positive communication.

Attitude is both foundational and fundamental. Attitude is foundational to all aspects of corporate productivity, communication and harmony. It’s the basis for what is erroneously known as morale. It’s NOT morale – it’s attitude. Low morale is a symptom – poor attitude is the problem.

Attitude is fundamental to all aspects of job performance. How much more profitable would your company be if EVERY employee (including you) had the attitude of yes?

These days, attitude is easily deteriorated. Cutbacks, budget cuts, over-tasked employees, poor leadership, lower profits and increased pressure to “do more with less.” Yet attitude is virtually ignored by every company HR and training department. Why? It’s hard to measure the ROI. Pity.

You’ve heard the expression: Attitude is everything.

Let me break it down for you so you can have a better understanding of how “everything” attitude really is:

Your attitude rules your mood.

Your attitude rules your self-esteem.
Your attitude rules your communication.
Your attitude rules your interactions.
Your attitude rules your thought process.

Your attitude rules how you perceive things.
Your attitude rules how you perceive people.
Your attitude rules how others perceive you.

Your attitude rules your service.
Your attitude rules your sales.

Your attitude rules your career.

Your attitude rules your family.

Your attitude rules your life.

In your business, your attitude rules your sales, service, communication and internal morale. And at the end of positive attitude in your business is a ton of referrals and a great reputation.

Pretty important, huh?

Well, if your attitude is so important, how come you don’t spend 15 minutes at home each morning building it? Or 15 minutes in the morning when you get to work? What are YOU doing to ensure that every employee gets a daily YES! message?

Here are a few more attitude insights:

• Attitude starts at home with your family.

• Attitude is personal. It’s not about other people or other circumstances. Attitude is ALL about you.

• Attitude is selfish. You do it for yourself FIRST. Then and only then can you give it, or pass it along, to others.

• Attitude is a choice. You are ALWAYS free to choose: How you give value. Doing what you love.
Having the right attitude.

• Attitude is a gift and a blessing – self-given and self-imposed. And it is my greatest hope that you discover that truth and bless yourself forever.

Maybe it’s time to invest in attitude training.

 

 

Jeffrey Gitomer is the author of The Sales Bible, Customer Satisfaction is Worthless Customer Loyalty is Priceless, The Little Red Book of Selling, The Little Red Book of Sales Answers, The Little Black Book of Connections, The Little Gold Book of YES! Attitude, The Little Green Book of Getting Your Way, The Little Platinum Book of Cha-Ching, The Little Teal Book of Trust, The Little Book of Leadership, and Social BOOM! His website, www.gitomer.com, will lead you to more information about training and seminars, or email him personally: salesman@gitomer.com.

 

© 2012 All Rights Reserved – Don’t even think about reproducing this document without written

permission from Jeffrey H. Gitomer and Buy Gitomer . 704/333-1112

Getting training in order. The correct order.


| editorial@queenscourier.com

By Jeffrey Gitomer

Many companies are considering training programs for the new year.

New budgets. New needs. New opportunities.

And most companies will concentrate on “it.” Whatever it is — more sales, a new product launch, customer service, internal operations, diversity or whatever is “pressing.”

All of that is wrong — or should I say, out of order.

Before you train ANYTHING, before you launch any new program or initiative, ask yourself these two questions:

1. How positive are the attitudes of our people?

2. How attitudinally receptive will our people be to this training?

If the answer to “How’s our attitude?” is “Not too good” or “Inconsistent” or “My attitude is great, it’s everyone else’s attitude that’s the problem!” then the training will be met with resistance, and will fall short of your expected outcome. Way short.

The answer to this dilemma is very simple, yet it’s overlooked at most every company in the world: Train attitude first. Positive attitude. YES! Attitude.

Positive attitude is not a “program” or an “initiative.” It’s an imperative. It’s not the “flavor of the month.” It’s the feeling of and for a lifetime. Your lifetime.

Attitude is the mood of every employee. Positive attitude leads to positive productivity and positive communication.

Attitude is both foundational and fundamental. Attitude is foundational to all aspects of corporate productivity, communication and harmony. It’s the basis for what is erroneously known as morale. It’s NOT morale — it’s attitude. Low morale is a symptom — poor attitude is the problem.

Attitude is fundamental to all aspects of job performance. How much more profitable would your company be if EVERY employee (including you) had the attitude of yes?

These days attitude is easily deteriorated — cutbacks, budget cuts, over-tasked employees, poor leadership, lower profits and increased pressure to “do more with less.” Yet attitude is virtually ignored by every company HR and training department. Why? It’s hard to measure the ROI. Pity.

You’ve heard the expression: Attitude is everything.

Let me break it down for you so you can have a better understanding of how “everything” attitude really is:

Your attitude rules your mood.

Your attitude rules your self-esteem.

Your attitude rules your communication.

Your attitude rules your interactions.

Your attitude rules your thought process.

Your attitude rules how you perceive things.

Your attitude rules how you perceive people.

Your attitude rules how others perceive you.

Your attitude rules your service.

Your attitude rules your sales.

Your attitude rules your career.

Your attitude rules your family.

Your attitude rules your life.

In your business, your attitude rules your sales, your service, your communication and internal morale. And at the end of positive attitude in your business is a ton of referrals and a great reputation.

Pretty important, huh?

Well, if your attitude is so important, how come you don’t spend 15 minutes at home each morning building it? Or 15 minutes in the morning when you get to work? What are YOU doing to ensure that every employee gets a daily YES! message?

Here are a few more attitude insights:

• Attitude starts at home with your family.

• Attitude is personal. It’s not about other people or other circumstances. Attitude is ALL about you.

• Attitude is selfish. You do it for yourself FIRST. Then and only then can you give it, or pass it along, to others.

• Attitude is a choice. You are ALWAYS free to choose: How you give value. Doing what you love. Having the right attitude.

• Attitude is a gift and a blessing — self-given and self-imposed. And it is my greatest hope that you discover that truth and bless yourself forever.

Maybe it’s time to invest in attitude training.

 

Jeffrey Gitomer is the author of The Sales Bible, CustomerSatisfaction is Worthless Customer Loyalty is Priceless, The Little Red Book of Selling, The Little Red Book of Sales Answers, The Little Black Book of Connections, The Little Gold Book of YES! Attitude, The Little Green Book of Getting Your Way, The Little Platinum Book of Cha-Ching, The Little Teal Book of Trust, The Little Book of Leadership, and Social BOOM! His website, www.gitomer.com, will lead you to more information about training and seminars, or email himpersonally: salesman@gitomer.com.

© 2012 All Rights Reserved – Don’t even think about reproducing this document without written
permission from Jeffrey H. Gitomer and Buy Gitomer . 704/333-1112

Salespeople have questions, Jeffrey has answers


| editorial@queenscourier.com

I get a ton of emails from people seeking insight or asking me to solve sales dilemmas. Here are a few that may relate to your job, your life and, most importantly, your sales thought process right now:

Jeffrey, Your seminars and books have been highly therapeutic to me in my budding sales career, but I have a question I’m having a hard time answering on my own. My wife is building a Mary Kay business, loves what you do, and is dying to put your methods to use. Her business is 80 percent selling product and 20 percent recruiting. A lot of the recruits typically come from the product buyer’s group. How does one combine those two activities without turning off the “makeup buying” customers who are not interested in a sales career? Does someone like her put up a “beauty tips” social media presence to promote to her “makeup buying customers” and then a separate one for recruiting people to a team?Or do you pepper one in with the other? My concern is turning off the “product buying public” that IS interested in beauty tips but NOT interested in being recruited.

I appreciate your guidance, Matt

Matt, Here’s the wisdom I would share with your wife… Luckily, the product you’re selling has been around for years and enjoys a great reputation. I recommend you interview some recruits who have embraced the opportunity to sell and let some of your more successful people post on the website about how they started out loving the product and ended up reselling the product. If the message does not come from you, it will not be a turn off. The key is balance – and your job is to balance beauty tips with beauty money making opportunities of at least 5:1 in favor of beauty tips.

Best regards, Jeffrey

Jeffrey, How do buyers decide, and what are buyers looking for? Alana

Buyers are looking for 4.5 things:

1. A perceived difference of your product and service – and that of your competitors.

2. A better perceived value in buying what you have versus buying from a competitor. (Notice I did not say “lower price.” I said “better value.”)

3. Little or no risk in purchasing from you. The buyer must perceive that the gain of ownership is greater than the risk of purchasing the wrong thing.

4. The buyer must like you, believe you, have confidence in you and trust you. But it begins with liking you.

4.5 Lowest price. Many people (maybe even you) will think I have done them a disservice by not focusing on price concessions or winning a bid. But, if you present the first four elements outlined above, price will go away as an issue in 60-70 percent of the sales you make. The key is this: Buyers and decision makers are looking for “comfort,” not just a “deal.” The decision maker has to feel that it’s a good fit for their company, or they will pass no matter what the price. The decision maker is also going to take into account past dealings and word-of-mouth advertising. All buyers and decision makers in any given industry know one another.Your job, besides having a great product, is to have a great reputation. Having a great reputation reduces the perceived risk and often times is the very key to getting the order.

Best regards, Jeffrey

Jeffrey, In these hard times, what can salespeople do to protect their jobs? Tom

Tom, The antidote is to be the best sales man or sales woman. No one’s going to get rid of you then. There is a challenge among salespeople right now. They’re not really willing to do the hard work that it takes to make selling easy. You need to tweet, have a business Facebook page, have a LinkedIn account, have a YouTube channel, have a blog and have a website where you have registered yourname.com. It’s about building a personal brand. You have to have 500 people following you on Twitter, you have to have 500 LinkedIn connections, you have to have about a thousand people on your Facebook fan page and you have to have a least a dozen YouTube videos up where people give testimonials for you, or where you are giving valuable information to the marketplace. That requires work and time, and you can’t do it during your workday. You’ve also got to network and do prospecting, but it’s a lot easier to prospect on LinkedIn than it is to prospect on the phone with people you don’t know. But instead of performing those strategies, a lot of people are going home at night to watch stupid television shows. Think about this: Will what you’re watching on television help you double your sales? No! Great salespeople are willing to dig in and do the hard work because they understand there’s no nine to five job in selling unless you’re at McDonald’s and you can ask the closing question, “Do you want fries with that?”

Best regards, Jeffrey

Jeffrey Gitomer is the author of The Sales Bible, Customer Satisfaction is Worthless Customer Loyalty is Priceless, The Little Red Book of Selling, The Little Red Book of Sales Answers, The Little Black Book of Connections, The Little Gold Book of YES! Attitude, The Little Green Book of Getting Your Way, The Little Platinum Book of Cha-Ching, The Little Teal Book of Trust, The Little Book of Leadership, and Social BOOM! His website, www.gitomer.com, will lead you to more information about training and seminars, or email him personally at salesman@gitomer.com.

© 2011 All Rights Reserved. Don’t even think about reproducing this document

without written permission from Jeffrey H. Gitomer and Buy Gitomer. 704/333-1112

What are you really asking of “your people?”


| editorial@queenscourier.com

“I want my people to be accountable.”

“I want our people to be MORE accountable.”

“Our main issue this year is ‘accountability.’”

Sound familiar? Accountability is the number one recurring theme throughout sales leadership in the United States. Sales leaders want their salespeople to be more accountable for their actions, activity, numbers and (of course) sales.

And it’s TOTALLY WRONG, TOTALLY BACKWARD, TOTALLY INSULTING and TOTALLY ANTI-SALES.

How’s that for an opinion?

REALITY: NO SALESPERSON WANTS TO BE ACCOUNTABLE. They got into sales so they WOULDN’T have to be accountable.           

But sales leadership, even in their current CYA situation, has no concept of “field reality.” Rather, they implement some form of accountability through CRM (customer relationship management), and wonder why NO ONE uses it, much less keeps it up to date.

CRM is an advanced form of database that helps salespeople keep track of customers, and on the surface, it seems like a great tool. But it’s complex, cumbersome and requires additional work. Leadership, who bought CRM for the wrong reason, expects all salespeople to document everything. But salespeople don’t.

CRM programs are the most-purchased, least-used software in the history of the computer. Why?

The reality is: CRM doesn’t help salespeople make sales.

Which brings me to today’s subject: accountability versus responsibility.

Sales leaders who want their people to be accountable are passing off their leadership duties to someone else, and then blaming them for failure. Wrong approach.

Leadership and accountability are at the opposite ends of the spectrum, especially the sales spectrum.

THINK ABOUT IT THIS WAY: You’re accountable to me (not good). I’m responsible for you (much better). And responsibility has a much more inclusive meaning.

As a leader, you’re responsible for your actions, responsible for your people, responsible for your attitude, responsible for your leadership skills and certainly responsible for your results.

As a leader, the only person you’re accountable to is yourself.

And if you pass on the same strategy and philosophy to your people, that THEY are…

• responsible for their actions

• responsible for their customers

• responsible for their attitude

• responsible for their sales skills

• responsible for their results

…your acceptance and respect as a leader will ensure positive growth.

If a salesperson takes responsibility for his or her knowledge, pipeline, customers, sales, income and success, your job as a leader shifts from a paranoid accountability manager to an encouraging, supportive leader.

 

What’s the difference?

Accountability sends the wrong message. It implies forced leadership and micro-managing. It has, at its base, “you are” and “you must” as a process. It’s “childish.”

Responsibility sends the right message. It’s individualized and team-oriented. It’s “I am” and “I will” as a process. It’s “adult.”

If I’m accountable, it’s less likely that I’ll ever do my best or be my best. Rather, I’ll do what’s necessary and report at the deadline – or just after.

I’m responsible has a chance to include character building and pride in my achievement and work.

I’m accountable lowers morale and creates disdain on the part of salespeople.

Here is the most telling difference:

“You’re accountable” indicates a corporate directive and an order.

“I’m responsible” indicates a personal decision and a success opportunity.

As negative as accountability is, there is one place it fits. You are accountable to yourself. You face the accountability mirror of truth every morning and every evening – in your bathroom. You are accountable to yourself for your attitude and you’re your results.

And in the end, accountability will still be “on message” and erroneously rule the sales airwaves, even though what I have written is truth and reason.

What’s your take on responsibility versus accountability? Post your views at facebook.com/jeffreygitomer, or tweet them @gitomer

 

Jeffrey Gitomer is the author of The Sales Bible, Customer Satisfaction is Worthless Customer Loyalty is Priceless, The Little Red Book of Selling, The Little Red Book of Sales Answers, The Little Black Book of Connections, The Little Gold Book of YES! Attitude, The Little Green Book of Getting Your Way, The Little Platinum Book of Cha-Ching, The Little Teal Book of Trust, The Little Book of Leadership, and Social BOOM! His website, www.gitomer.com, will lead you to more information about training and seminars, or email him personally at salesman@gitomer.com.

© 2011 All Rights Reserved. Don’t even think about reproducing this document

without written permission from Jeffrey H. Gitomer and Buy Gitomer. 704/333-1112