Tag Archives: jamaica

Jamaica Colosseum Mall selling for $45M


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Photos courtesy of Jamaica Colosseum Mall

In another big sign that Jamaica is changing, the more than three-decade-old Jamaica Colosseum Mall known for its hip-hop clothing stores and huge jewelry exchange is being marketed for sale.

The mall, which was a Macy’s until 1978, has been listed by Epic Commercial Realty for $45 million.

The site at 89-02 165th St. has nearly 50,000 square feet of space and up to 250,000 square feet of buildable potential for a commercial or residential development, New York YIMBY reported.

The mall could be sold for about $180 per buildable square foot at its current asking price, which would be significantly higher than many other listing sites in the neighborhood.

But as some experts have noted, now is the time for owners to cash in on Jamaica while the market is hot.

A few blocks over from the mall at 168th Street, developers are also working on an $85 million retail and residential complex.

Jamaica Colosseum Mall was founded in 1984 and began with an indoor flea market, according to its website.

Jamaica Colosseum mall 2

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17 city-owned sites in Jamaica identified for new affordable housing


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Christopher Bride/PropertyShark, Map courtesy of Google

In the de Blasio Administration’s latest effort to make a dent in the city’s housing crisis, the Department of Housing Preservation and Development is calling on developers to build housing on about 175 sites across the city.

The agency released a list of vacant, city-owned properties for the construction of affordable housing across the five boroughs last week, including 17 sites in Jamaica, which are the only Queens locations.

The agency is collecting applications from developers until Feb. 19 for the program.

The city is even offering financing through its Neighborhood Construction and New Infill Homeownership Opportunities programs, but it comes with the requirement that at least one of every three units must be affordable or up to 80 percent of Area Median Income. That’s no more than $67,120 in annual income for a family of four.

This effort seems to be part of Mayor de Blasio’s plan to create and preserve 200,000 units of affordable housing over 10 years.

The single largest lot in the program is at 108-59 Union Hall St., which has 8,830 square feet. But if combined with adjoining vacant lots at 108-41, 43, 49, and 51 there is about 20,800 square feet of space.

Take a look at the map below to see where the Jamaica properties are, and click here for the full city-wide list.

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Developmentally disabled Queens woman missing for more than a month


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of NYPD

A Richmond Hill woman who is developmentally disabled and needs daily medication has been missing since early December, according to one of the centers where she receives services.

Bibi Kadim, 37, was last seen on Dec. 5. That day, Kadim had gone for lunch in the Jamaica neighborhood where Queens Centers for Progress (QCP), a place she goes for services, is located.

After she did not return from lunch, the staff called her mother. She told them that her daughter was scheduled for a medical clinic appointment that afternoon, but that Kadim had canceled, according to QCP.

Her parents, who live with Kadim in their home, have not heard from their daughter since she went missing.

The Shield Institute in Bayside, where Kadim also receives services, has known her for nearly 18 years. The center describes her as a very friendly individual who can communicate her wants and needs verbally. But, according to her parents, she has a child-like mentality.

She is also diabetic and needs daily medication and therefore is “at great risk,” according to QCP.

“We are obviously very concerned that Bibi has been missing for this length of time,” said Charles Houston, CEO of QCP said in a statement. “QCP and The Shield Institute are working with the family and police to bring Bibi home.”

Kadim is 5 feet 5 inches tall and 194 pounds. She was last seen wearing a pink hoodie, navy blue jacket, blue jeans and  sneakers.

Anyone with information is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 800-577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the Crime Stoppers website or can text their tips to CRIMES (274637), then enter TIP577. All calls are strictly confidential.

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Five Jamaica small businesses to receive $95K city grant to upgrade facades


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photos by Liam La Guerre

It’s well noted that there are many major projects that indicate Jamaica will be one of the next thriving Queens areas for development and business, but local advocacy groups don’t want to look past small merchants already doing business downtown.

For that reason, the Sutphin Boulevard Business Improvement District (BID) announced it will divide a $95,000 grant from the city’s Small Business Services department (SBS) among five businesses on the boulevard for projects that revitalize storefronts.

The Sutphin BID was one of 80 citywide organizations to apply for a grant from SBS, and only one of seven to win. It was also the only Queens group to receive funding.

By helping small businesses upgrade their facades, the BID hopes it will improve the look of the neighborhood and subsequently increase economic activity by attracting shoppers.

“Jamaica has been going through a metamorphosis for years and often people focus on the big, majestic projects, but if you look around here, the heart and soul of Jamaica is the mom-and-pop stores,” Councilman Rory Lancman said. “If we can help those small businesses improve their appearance, we can increase traffic to Jamaica, making it more of a destination for people from outside this area.”

The idea to apply for the grant from SBS began after a 2013 consumer survey, which pointed out the need to upgrade the look of businesses, according to Simone Price, executive director of the BID.

Sutphin Sign

“Many of the businesses on Sutphin Boulevard are unappealing, lack consistency in character or quality of signage, awnings and window displays,” Price said. “This pilot program will demonstrate the significance of financial investment as it relates to the positive experience when visiting the area.”

The grant will cover 80 percent of construction costs for the five businesses for projects that include revitalizing signage, lighting, windows and other parts of storefronts.

The initiative will roll out in three phases. In phase one, which will run from January through March, the BID will collect applicants and select the businesses.

During phase two, which is expected to be from April through June, the businesses will sign contracts for their projects and designs will be selected. The BID will also begin marketing the initiative and construction will begin. The final phase will finish in December with the completion of the projects’ construction.

Elizabeth Pilarte, who owns Party Moments, a store dedicated to selling party supplies, plans to apply for part of the money to get improved lighting and upgrade her storefront.

“This will definitely bring more customers and make our business stay here and grow in Jamaica,” she said.

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Jamaica parking lots will become $85M affordable housing and retail complex


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Christopher Bride/PropertyShark

Developers of a plan to transform two parallel open-air parking lots in Jamaica into a massive retail center will also add a housing component to the mix, The Courier has learned.

The project, which has been expanded since an initial announcement in 2013, is a joint effort between the owner of the parking lots near 168th Street and 90th Avenue, the nonprofit Greater Jamaica Development Corp. (GJDC), and Blumenfeld Development Group (BDG).

The GJDC will transfer the lots to Blumenfeld, which will construct a 265,000-square-foot retail center, an affordable housing residential building and a parking garage with about 550 spots to replace the lost parking in the deal. Blumenfeld will return the garage to the not-for-profit agency after completion of the project, according to representatives of the developer. The project is estimated to cost $85 million at this point.

“The reason why this is a good thing is because there is no space in downtown Jamaica that can accommodate a big-box retailer,” GJDC Executive Vice President Andrew Manshel said. “It’ll certainly bring more people to the downtown and increase foot traffic, so that’s good for everybody.”

The retail center will be built on one parking lot, which sits between Merrick Boulevard and 168th Street.

The second parking lot, between 168th Street and 169th Street, will have a retail component to complement the shopping center across the street as well as the residential building and the parking garage.

Blumenfeld has already spoken to a number of big-box retailers to be the anchor tenant of the project, representatives said, including BJ’s, Costco and Burlington Coat Factory.

“The number of people living and working in downtown Jamaica combine to create significant demand and buying power that exceeds the current retail supply by $3.7 billion,” said David Blumenfeld, vice president of the development firm. “We expect our efforts to help attract a combination of retailers that can tap into the unmet demand, creating additional jobs, investment and tax revenue.”

The project needs to go through the city’s Uniform Land Use Review Procedure (ULURP) approval process, because the developer will not be able to build the massive parking garage under current zoning regulations. They are aiming to get approval by 2016.

Since the project is still in the planning phases, representatives could not immediately say how big the residential building will be and how much of it would be moderate- and low-income housing. The decision to add affordable housing was brought about in part because of Mayor Bill de Blasio’s ambitious push to create more housing, representatives said.

“We also believe that the project can make an impact beyond the provision of new retail opportunities,” Blumenfeld said. “We share the administration’s belief that the addition of affordable housing brings an added benefit to the community, and we are enthusiastic about assisting the city [in making] additional strides toward meeting its housing goals.”

The plan to transform Jamaica parking lots into major development projects has become a popular one recently, as it has been throughout the city.

Last year, representatives from the New York City Economic Development Corp. announced plans for a request for proposals to develop a 45,000-square-foot parking garage on 168th Street between Jamaica and Archer avenues.

Also, in October an investor bought a huge parking garage and commercial strip at 163-05 and 163-25 Archer Ave., and plans to develop the property into a housing and retail mix, according to a published report.

 

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Councilman opens legal center in his Jamaica office aimed at helping immigrants


| slicata@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photos by Salvatore Licata

Access to legal services, particularly for immigrants, just got a little easier in Jamaica thanks to Councilman Ruben Wills, who opened a new legal service annex in his Jamaica office for his constituents — and the services are all free.

“There had long been a glaring need in my district for free legal services,” Wills said. “To better meet the needs of my constituents as well as members of the greater community, I maximized their availability. In light of President Obama’s recent executive order on immigration, we fully expect a future surge in demand.”

The newly renovated space, which is located at 95-26 Sutphin Blvd., is just blocks away from Queens County Civil and Supreme Court. It has increased capacity to accommodate both an attorney and a paralegal or junior attorney. The office is working in part with CUNY Citizenship Now, which provides those visiting with assistance when navigating the legal process. Right now, legal services are provided three days a week at the office but this will increase to four in the coming months.

One of the residents already helped by Wills and the legal team came to the ribbon cutting ceremony on Jan. 8 to show his appreciation. Miguel Garcia, 70, came to the United States in 1969 from El Salvador. He was having issues getting his full citizenship. The major difficulty was a language barrier as he only spoke Spanish and didn’t fully understand the legal process.

He was helped by Rosanna Eugenio, a lawyer at the office, back in 2012 and was finally granted his full citizenship in 2013.

willis_2

“Their help was great,” Garcia said through a translator. “I had no problems once I came here for help. Being a citizen feels great: I feel free and don’t have to worry anymore.”

Garcia is one of the 600 constituents in Wills’ district that was or is being helped by the program. The new program offers an immigration attorney two days a week and a general attorney two days a week.

Wills also said on Fridays, he is offering the office to those in his council district who need a place to study for their legal exams if they are choosing a career path in law.

“Free legal assistance is vital to the community’s well-being,” Assemblywomen Vivian Cook said. “This expansion will aid more of our constituents at a faster rate and produce better outcomes.”

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Man of the Year: Carlisle Towery


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Photos courtesy of the Greater Jamaica Development Corp.

Many people say Jamaica wouldn’t be the up-and-coming community it is today without Carlisle Towery.

Over the course of four decades, Towery has watched over Jamaica as the head of the not-for-profit Greater Jamaica Development Corp. (GJDC) and guided its regrowth as an emerging neighborhood.

He witnessed the initial economic decline throughout Jamaica as department stores and anchor stores shut their doors and left for brighter pastures in malls across Long Island and elsewhere as his organization planted the seeds of the future by working to attract various public and private projects to the neighborhood.

In the process he formed important business relationships, which helped to eventually bring back retailers and investors. Now developers around the city have been eyeing Jamaica as the next frontier for opportunity, and massive projects that will spur economic growth are already planned.

After setting the table for Jamaica’s revival, Towery plans to watch the completion of his work from the outside. He recently announced his retirement from the position where he has spent half of his life.

For his many accomplishments that have helped to improve the Jamaica community from all angles, The Courier has selected Towery as its Man of the Year.

“His most extraordinary contributions to Jamaica have been unparalleled in terms of his achievement, persistence, and creating an environment for business to grow,” said Victoria Schneps, publisher of The Courier. “He has focused his life’s work on all aspects of the Jamaica community, and has made it better for his having been there.”

Towery, born and raised in Alabama, received a bachelor’s degree in architecture from Auburn University and then moved to New York City to study urban planning at Columbia University in 1961 after earning a full scholarship.

He later went on to use his planning skills, including an assignment as chief urban designer of the Regional Plan Association, a Manhattan-based organization that focuses on improving urban growth across the New York metropolitan region.

Carlisle

While at the RPA he began working on a plan to transform Jamaica and repair the business community it started to lose. He presented the plan to the members of a chamber of commerce that represented Jamaica and impressed its board members.

At the time, the organization was working on establishing a not-for-profit, which would later become the GJDC, to bring economic growth back to a neighborhood that had suffered mightily from the urban decay of the early 1970s. The GJDC was formed and its new leaders picked Towery to be its first president in 1971.

“He is very bright and knowledgeable, conscientious, an excellent speaker and an expert planner,” said Vincent Albanese, a founder of the GJDC and current board member. “We were very impressed with his background, his expertise, and we were fortunate that [the RPA was] prepared to make him available to us.”

When Towery took the role of president of the GJDC he knew that he would be presented with a major challenge in the coming years.

Jamaica was heading into an era he later called the “disinvestment decade,” as downtown Jamaica’s anchoring department store giants, Macy’s, Gertz and Mays were all about to leave the area.

Towery fought to keep the stores, which he knew were the lifeblood of the community, but they all ended up exiting, starting with Macy’s in 1978. And as the bigger retailers left, so did smaller ones. Some banks and The Long Island Daily Press also closed around this time.

Jamaica had gone quickly from one of the city’s major commercial centers — a hub for Long Island shoppers who arrived at the Long Island Rail Road station — to a shell of its former self.

Its row of movie theaters, including the once-majestic Loews Valencia, shut their doors. The Valencia would later be resurrected and renovated as a church.

Towery oversaw city, state and federal partnerships over the next four decades that resulted in a revitalization of the neighborhood into one of the borough’s hottest development areas.

From 1978 to 1996, private investment in Jamaica totaled just $17 million, compared with the $364 million that has been invested in the last three years, according to the GJDC.

“He has had tremendous accomplishments,” Albanese said. “Jamaica was not growing, not serving the best interest of the business or residential communities. There was a tremendous need for a person of his caliber.”

Towery credits a number of strong public initiatives in Jamaica in the past few decades that led to the rebuilding of the downtown. He persistently advocated what he calls “pre-developments” through seven mayors and eight governors, dating back to John Lindsay and Nelson Rockefeller, and the federal government to attract more private investment.

This includes removing the Jamaica Avenue El and extending the subway to Parsons Boulevard, which started the creation of the transportation hub in the downtown area, and moving York College into the neighborhood instead of alternative sites.

Towery says York College’s move to Jamaica was the greatest development for the neighborhood while he was head of the GJDC because of the jobs it creates and the college’s ability to interact with the community in many ways.

“We worked our tails off to get York College here,” he said in a recent interview.

Today the college, part of the City University, is the only site in the borough selected to be part of Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s START-UP NY initiative, a much-heralded economic development initiative that will encourage businesses to partner with the school and move to Jamaica, either to a location on the campus or in the surrounding area, in exchange for wide-ranging tax breaks.

York College is now in negotiations with many businesses looking to partner with the school in exchange for being exempt from corporate, sales or property taxes for 10 years. The new businesses would move to a property near the school or build on a portion of 3.5 acres of vacant, government-owned land on campus. The college is slowly becoming the hub for business, opportunity and community that Towery envisioned it could.

York College - Campus and students.

The GJDC also supported building the new regional Jamaica headquarters for the U.S. Social Security Administration and U.S. Food and Drug Administration, which are two federal agencies that brought jobs into the neighborhood.

The not-for-profit also advocated for the construction of the AirTrain rail line from John F. Kennedy International Airport in 2003, which further expanded Jamaica’s transportation hub to new heights.

That transportation hub, which is now comprised of various subway lines, an LIRR station, numerous bus lines and the AirTrain, has become a magnet for development.

After a 368-block rezoning was completed in downtown Jamaica in 2007 near the transit hub to allow more developments with commercial and residential uses, more and more developers have been planning large-scale projects there.

Some local initiatives and projects that have helped shape Jamaica were original ideas the GJDC started under Towery’s leadership, such as the creation of the first business improvement district in the downtown area to focus on the growth of local stores and companies and the first green market in New York City.

“Carlisle has been extremely successful in attracting government resources to the downtown, and has been a leader in urban revitalization and ahead of lots of other people with ideas of how to make things go better in downtowns,” said Andrew Manshel, the GJDC’s executive vice president. “He has integrated arts and culture in economic development way before that got to be a standard practice.”

In 2014, the GJDC was proud to announce the development of a $225 million mixed-use, 29-story residential and commercial tower at the building it owns on 93-01 Sutphin Blvd. just north of the LIRR and AirTrain station. The project led numerous community leaders and politicians to proclaim the return of Jamaica, because it followed the 2013 announcement of a 210-room, 24-story hotel on the south side of the LIRR complex at 93-43 Sutphin Blvd., a plot of land that is partly owned by the GJDC.

Jamaica also saw some sales last year that showed developers were highly interested in purchasing land in the area and building commercial centers or residential properties. A 90,000-square-foot building and parking garage at 163-05 and 163-25 Archer Ave., which has 719,736 square feet of buildable space, was sold for $22 million in October. Additionally, a development site at 147-07 to 147-37 94th Ave., which has 420,000 buildable square feet, was listed for $24 million.

Going forward, Towery believes that Jamaica is in need of more housing developments, since most of the GJDC’s projects and partnerships have been unrelated to housing. New housing in the area should be 50 percent market rate, 30 percent moderate income and 20 percent low income for Jamaica, he said in a published interview.

Towery also said in that interview that his replacement should be a visionary who should pursue productive partnerships.

Towery plans to retire with his wife to their home in Maine. But because he’ll always be interested in what Jamaica will become in the future, he hopes to keep a close eye on the neighborhood as it completes its transformation.

 

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Deadly Jamaica house fire caused by extension cords: FDNY


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Graphic Image

A Jamaica house blaze that killed one man and left his 89-year-old mother injured was an accidental fire sparked by extension cords, the FDNY said.

The electrical fire broke out at about 3:30 a.m. Monday in the basement of a single-family home on 118th Road near Marsden Street, authorities said. It took firefighters until about 5:10 a.m. to put out the flames.

There were no working smoke detectors in the two-story house, according to the FDNY.

A 64-year-old man was taken to Queens Hospital Center, where he was pronounced dead, authorities said. His mother was transported to Franklin Hospital in stable condition.

A third person refused medical attention at the scene.

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Police looking for gold charm thief


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of NYPD

A thief with a penchant for gold jewelry stole from two Queens businesses last year, according to authorities.

He first targeted a Corona jewelry store at 97-09 Roosevelt Ave. at 5:30 p.m. on Sept. 22. The suspect then stole from Gem Pawn Brokers at 90-26 Sutphin Blvd. in Jamaica at 2:30 p.m. on Oct. 20.

The suspect took the jewelry by asking to see several gold charms at each store and then would distract the employee while he would swipe one of the charms before fleeing.

Anyone with information is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 800-577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the Crime Stoppers website or can text their tips to CRIMES (274637), then enter TIP577. All calls are strictly confidential.

Woman wanted for kidnapping 3-month-old boy in Jamaica


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Sharondalis Morgan is suspected in the kidnapping a 3-month-old Jamaica boy.

An 18-year-old woman kidnapped a 3-month-old baby from his Jamaica home before later abandoning him outside a Brooklyn hospital, police said.

The suspected kidnapper, identified as Sharondalis Morgan, had recently befriended the child’s mother and was inside her apartment on 177th Street on Sunday about 3:40 p.m. when she took the boy, cops said. Morgan was able to grab the baby when the mother left the room, and then she fled the home.

The child was later found outside of Woodhull Medical Center in good health. It wasn’t clear how long after the woman kidnapped the boy that he was discovered at the medical facility.

Police describe the suspect as black, 5 feet 2 inches tall and 150 pounds.

Anyone with information is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 800-577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the Crime Stoppers website or can text their tips to CRIMES (274637), then enter TIP577. All calls are strictly confidential.

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64-year-old man killed in Jamaica house fire


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Graphic Image

Updated Tuesday, Jan. 6, 9:59 a.m.

An early morning house fire in Jamaica left one man dead and his elderly mother injured, authorities said.

The fire started just after 3:30 a.m. on Monday in the basement of the two-story home on 118th Road near Marsden Street, authorities said. It took firefighters until about 5:10 a.m. to control the flames.

Two residents were taken to area hospitals, according to police.

An 89-year-old woman was transported to Franklin Hospital in stable condition. Her 64-year-old son was taken to Queens Hospital Center, where he was pronounced dead. His identity has not been released by police.

A third person refused medical treatment at the scene, the FDNY said.

The cause of the fire is under investigation.

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Former Gov. Mario Cuomo dies at 82


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Photo via Kenneth C. Zirkel /Wikimedia Commons

Updated Friday, Jan. 2, 5:26 p.m.

Former three-term Gov. Mario Cuomo, once a leading and passionate voice for the liberal wing of the Democratic Party and one of the most important political figures to come from Queens, died on Thursday. He was 82.

Cuomo, who was raised in Jamaica, passed away only hours after his son, Gov. Andrew Cuomo, was sworn in for a second term during an inauguration held in Lower Manhattan at the World Trade Center.

The elder Cuomo had been ill for months. His last public appearance was on Election Night when he was with his son during a victory celebration.

Gov. Cuomo spoke about his father during his inaugural address Thursday morning, noting that “we’re missing one family member.” Cuomo spent New Year’s Eve with his ailing father and family, even reading him his speech.

“He couldn’t be here physically today, my father. But my father is in this room. He is in the heart and mind of every person who is here. He is here and he is here,” Cuomo said pointing to his head and heart. “And his inspiration and his legacy and his experience is what has brought this state to this point. So let’s give him a round of applause,” Cuomo said.

According to the governor’s office, Mario Cuomo “passed away from natural causes due to heart failure this evening at home with his loving family at his side.”

Cuomo was remembered as an important voice in both state and national politics.

“From the hard streets of Queens, Mario Cuomo rose to the very pinnacle of political power in New York because he believed in his bones in the greatness of this state, the greatness of America and the unique potential of every individual,” said Sen. Charles Schumer.

“My prayers and thoughts are with the governor, the whole Cuomo family, and all who knew and loved Mario,” Schumer said. “Our hearts go out to Gov. Andrew Cuomo who gave a great speech today that I am certain his father was proud of.”

In a statement issued by the White House Thursday night, President Obama paid homage to Cuomo as “an Italian Catholic kid from Queens, born to immigrant parents,” who “paired his faith in God and faith in America to live a life of public service — and we are all better for it.”

“He rose to be chief executive of the state he loved, a determined champion of progressive values, and an unflinching voice for tolerance, inclusiveness, fairness, dignity and opportunity,” Obama said in his prepared statement.

The son of Italian immigrants who owned a grocery store in South Jamaica, Cuomo cut his political teeth in Queens.

Cuomo first rose to public prominence in 1972 when he was appointed by Mayor John Lindsay as a mediator during bitter a dispute over a proposal to build low-income public housing towers in upper-middle Forest Hills. Prior to that, he had successfully represented Queens homeowners in high-profile disputes with the city and private developers.

Cuomo lost two early political contests — first a Democratic primary for lieutenant governor in 1974 and then the 1977 Democratic primary for mayor of New York City when he was defeated by Ed Koch. He won his first campaign in 1978 in the race for lieutenant governor.

He ran for governor four years later, defeating Koch in the Democratic primary before going on to win the general election.

Cuomo graduated from St. John’s Preparatory School and attended one year at St. John’s University before he was lured away from college by an offer to play baseball for a minor league affiliate of the Pittsburgh Pirates. But after suffering a serious injury when he was hit in the back of the head by a baseball, he returned to St. John’s University.

Cuomo went on to earn a law degree at St. John’s, where he continued to teach part-time while he practiced law in both the private and public sector before entering politics.

As a Democratic governor during President Reagan’s administration, Cuomo was among the few in his party to challenge the then-popular president. He became the leading voice for the party’s liberal wing even as the nation skewed conservative in the 1980s.

It was his stunning keynote speech during the 1984 Democratic Convention in San Francisco that fueled speculation that Cuomo could seek the presidential nomination down the road. Cuomo himself continued to stoke the speculation until the last hour before the filing deadline for the New Hampshire primary in 1991.

But he remained a prominent voice within the party, known and admired for his soaring oratory.

Cuomo came up in 1993 as a potential Supreme Court nominee by President Clinton. But then in his third term as governor he removed his name from consideration for the top court.

Cuomo is survived by his wife of 60 years, Matilda Raffa Cuomo, his children Margaret, Andrew, Maria, Madeline and Christopher, and 14 grandchildren.

A wake will be held for Cuomo on Monday at the Frank E. Campbell Funeral Home, located at 1076 Madison Ave. in Manhattan, with calling hours from 1 to 5 p.m. and from 7 to 10 p.m. The following day, a funeral service will take place at the St. Ignatius Loyola Church at 980 Park Ave., also in Manhattan, at 11 a.m.

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Time to sell in Jamaica if the price is right


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Christopher Bride/ PropertyShark

Jamaica has been making headlines with plans for major projects and sites notching higher prices as developers continue to look for investing opportunities in the borough.

But while land prices are hot throughout Queens, and value is rising in Jamaica, prices could trend downwards soon. So now could be a good time for property owners in the neighborhood to sell and maximize profits, said Swain Weiner, president of Greinz-Maltz Investment Properties.

“It’s my belief that there is going to be an increase in [interest] rates sometime early next year,” Weiner said.  “Unemployment is at 5.8 percent, inflation is near zero, the economy is growing strong, and gas prices are low so it’s helping everybody. It’s not a matter of if, it’s a matter of when. If you feel you are near the top of the market, I think now is better to [sell] than later because nobody can accurately time the marketplace.”

The value increase in Jamaica is caused in part by its vast transportation hub of subways, buses, LIRR and the JFK Airtrain, where major projects have been announced and big properties have sold or listed for high prices.

A 90,000-square-foot building and parking garage at 163-05 and 163-25 Archer Ave., which has 719,736 square feet of buildable space, traded hands for $22 million in October. Additionally, a huge development site at 147-07 to 147-37 94th Ave. was listed for $24 million by real estate firm CPEX.

Even when it comes to residential properties, Jamaica prices are trending much higher than before.

Real estate website StreetEasy recently predicted Jamaica would be the fifth hottest neighborhood in the city for 2015, based on median asking rent and median sale price. In Jamaica, the median sale for homes rose by 72.2 percent over the year, according to the website.

Although there is a chance high prices in the neighborhood may increase even further, it could be better to sell than to wait, Weiner said.

“I think with the concern of the top of the market being in place and also some properties demonstrating strong interest, right now might be a good time to capitalize on the strength of Jamaica’s growth,” he said, “and minimize the risk in interest rates or correction of the market.”

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Two arrested in deadly Christmas shooting in Richmond Hill


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

HandcuffsHC0511_L_300_C_Y-624x413

Police have arrested two men in a Christmas Day shooting that killed a 20-year-old Jamaica man.

Abu Quick, 23, of the Bronx, and Jamar Alexander, 25, of Queens, have both been charged with second-degree murder and criminal possession of weapon in the death of James Bryant, cops said.

Bryant was found with a gunshot wound to the neck near 126th Street and 89th Avenue in Richmond Hill about 2:30 p.m. on Dec. 25, police said. He was taken to Jamaica Hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

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Police looking for suspect in attempted armed robbery of off-duty cop


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Video courtesy of NYPD

A masked man threatened to kill an off-duty cop during an attempted armed robbery in Jamaica earlier this month, police said.

The suspect approached the victim, a 30-year-old NYPD officer who was off duty at the time, on Sutphin Boulevard near Linden Boulevard at about 1:10 a.m. on Dec. 6 and pulled out a gun, cops said. The victim took cover behind a vehicle, drew his firearm and identified himself to the suspect.

The suspect then said he was going to kill the officer and came up to the vehicle, police said. Both the officer and the suspect circled the vehicle and the suspect fired once before fleeing on foot.

No one was injured.


Police have released a video showing the suspect walking toward the officer, and then circling the vehicle, and describe him as in his 20s, 5 feet 7 inches tall and 150 pounds.

Anyone with information is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 800-577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the Crime Stoppers website or can text their tips to CRIMES (274637), then enter TIP577. All calls are strictly confidential.

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