Tag Archives: Isabella

Mayor unveils most popular baby names in New York City


| brennison@queenscourier.com

mom and baby-face to face

Jayden is the new Michael in New York City.

For the fourth consecutive year, Jayden topped the list of the most popular boys’ names in New York City. The top girls’ name in the city in 2011 was Isabella for the third straight year.

Michael, the most popular name in the city between 1980 and 2006, ended up fifth on the list.

Isabella Pal and Jayden Alexander Marthone, both born in the city last year, flanked Mayor Michael Bloomberg during the announcement this morning and took home some gifts: a “Made in NY” T-shirt and a New York City bib.

“A baby born in New York City has a life expectancy 2.5 years longer than the national average, in no small part due to our bold public health initiatives,” said Bloomberg. “This means we can expect to see many of the very popularly named Isabellas and Jaydens – like these two little ones with us today – more than 80 years from now.”

Among the top 10 girls’ names, nine repeated from 2010, while eight were the same among boys, though in a slightly altered order.  Aiden and Alexander joined the boys’ top 10 and the girls’ added Sofia — a variation of the number two girls’ name Sophia.

The number of babies born in New York City dipped slightly from 2010 to 2011, down 1.4 percent from 124,791 to 123,029 (62,808 boys and 60,221 girls), according to the mayor’s office.

The rest of the boys’ top 10 included: Jacob, Ethan, Daniel, Michael, Matthew, Justin, David, Aiden and Alexander.  The girls’ list was rounded out with: Sophia, Olivia, Emma, Mia, Emily, Madison, Leah, Chloe and Sofia.

Health Department Announces New York City’s Favorite Baby Names from 2010


| tcimino@queenscourier.com

In 2010 in New York City Isabella and Jayden held fast as the most popular baby names for the second year in a row. The Health Department’s latest annual tally of New York City birth certificates shows that Isabella was the most popular name for baby girls born in 2010, with nearly 600 Isabellas added to the Big Apple last year. Jayden kept the top spot for boys with more than 800 newborn boys named Jayden.

From 2009 to 2010, the number of babies born in New York City dipped slightly, down 1.6% from 126,774 to 124,791 (64,076 boys and 60,715 girls). Brooklyn saw the greatest number of babies born last year with 41,469 births. Queens came is second with 26,955 births followed by 21,258 babies born in the Bronx, 19,646 in Manhattan and 5,580 on Staten Island. There are almost as many babies born on Staten Island (5,580) as there are babies born to New York State residents who live outside of New York City (5,719).

MOST POPULAR BABY NAMES NEW YORK CITY, 2010
Rank Girls Boys
1 Isabella Jayden
2 Sophia Ethan
3 Olivia Daniel
4 Emily Jacob
5 Madison David
6 Mia Justin
7 Emma Michael
8 Leah Matthew
9 Sarah Joseph
10 Chloe Joshua
NYC Total Births 60,715 64,076

Nine of the top 10 girls’ names for 2010 were holdovers from 2009, with Ashley falling to number 13 and Chloe joining the list, up from 11 to number 10. Among boys, Jacob and Joseph made it into the top 10 after getting bumped off two years ago. Jacob came back strong, listing in the 4th place slot as most popular in 2010 while Michael’s rank fell further to 7th place 4th place in 2009. Michael had been the top boy’s name during the 1980’s through early 2000’s.

Most Popular Baby Names by Race/Ethnicity

Preferences for baby names vary broadly across racial and ethnic groups. Isabella remained the most popular female name for Hispanic families, while Madison remained a favorite with black parents. Sophia is still number one for Asian girls. Esther is the new favorite for white families. Among boys, most Hispanic and black families again opted for the ever-popular Jayden. Asian families swapped Ryan for Ethan and white families favored Joseph.

A detailed list of the most popular baby names for 2010, broken down by race/ethnicity and sex, is available on the Health Department’s Vital Statistics Web page.

Star Power

New Yorkers continue to be inspired by movie, music, sports and fashion icons as they search for the perfect name. Last year’s big draws included common actress names such as Sofia (#16) and Angelina (#28), popular singer names like Usher (#155) and Mariah (#99), and athlete names namely Eli (#49) and Carmelo (#168). Suri (#136) and Jayden (#1) – names chosen by celebrity parents Katie Holmes and Will Smith – were also popular.

Biblical Names

Religious figures were an even bigger source of inspiration. Holy names for girls included Leah (#8), Sarah (#9), Esther (#15) Rachel (#18) and Chana and Miriam (tied for #34), while Daniel (#3), Jacob (#4), David (#5), Matthew (#8), Joseph (#9), Joshua (#10),  Noah (#20) and Elijah (#21) were often bestowed upon boys.

Geographic Names

Big cities and states were also popular baby names. Charlotte (#33) and Brooklyn (#138) were on the 2010 list. Austin (#109), Georgia (#136), Phoenix (#146), and Virginia (#151) also made the cut. Some parents selected international monikers like Paris (#125) and London (#164).

Top Ten Names by Race/Ethnicity

GIRLS

Rank

Hispanic

Black

White

Asian & Pacific Islander

1

Isabella

Madison

Esther

Sophia

2

Mia

Kayla

Olivia

Chloe

3

Emily

Nevaeh

Leah

Emily

4

Sophia

London

Sophia

Olivia

5

Ashley

Makayla

Emma

Isabella

6

Camila

Jada

Rachel

Fiona

7

Madison

Taylor

Isabella

Sarah

8

Brianna

Chloe

Sarah

Angelina

9

Gabriella

Brianna

Chana

Angela

10

Samantha

Gabrielle

Ava/Chaya

Jasmine

BOYS

Rank

Hispanic

Black

White

Asian & Pacific Islander

1

Jayden

Jayden

Joseph

Ethan

2

Justin

Joshua

David

Ryan

3

Angel

Elijah

Jacob

Justin

4

Jacob

Jeremiah

Michael

Eric

5

Christopher

Ethan

Daniel

Lucas

6

Alexander

Aiden

Moshe

Kevin

7

Daniel

Justin

Benjamin

Jason

8

Ethan

Michael

Matthew

Daniel

9

Anthony

Christian

Alexander

Jayden

10

Brandon/Joshua

Tyler

Jack/Samuel

Matthew

Keeping Babies Safe and Healthy

Whatever their names, babies do best when they’re nurtured by healthy parents in secure surroundings. Here are some recommendations to a healthy pregnancy and healthy child.

Plan Your Pregnancy

  • Use birth control until you are ready to get pregnant. Many safe and effective methods are available. Call 311 to find out where you can go for free or low-cost birth control. 
  • Make sure to see your doctor if you are planning to become pregnant and seek regular care as soon as you think you are pregnant. Regular prenatal care early in pregnancy can help prevent complications.
  • Maintain a healthy weight – and don’t smoke, misuse drugs or drink. Alcohol and other drugs cause miscarriages, birth defects and other serious problems.
  • If you smoke or use drugs or alcohol, quit now to protect your baby. Your health care provider can recommend programs to help you quit.
  • To prevent birth defects that affect the brain, take a daily multi-vitamin with at least 400 micrograms of folic acid if you are planning to become pregnant or are pregnant.

After Your Baby Is Born

  • Breastfeed your baby unless you are HIV-positive. Breastfeeding offers many health benefits for both mothers and babies. If you can, you should breastfeed exclusively for the first six months of your baby’s life.
  • Reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome and accidental suffocation by providing a safe sleep surface for napping and sleeping. Babies should sleep alone, on their backs, on a firm surface without pillows, toys or loose blankets.
  • Make sure your child is tested for lead poisoning at one and two years of age, as the law requires.
  • Make sure your child’s immunizations are up to date. Keep a record, and take it with you whenever you go to the doctor or clinic.
  • Make sure your home has properly-installed window guards. The law requires your building owner to install them in any unit that houses a child younger than 11.
  • It is normal to feel a mix of emotions after childbirth, including joy, anxiety and sadness. Some women experience mild depression a few days after delivery. These “baby blues” usually subside within a few weeks. If they persist or worsen, you should seek help from a health care provider or call 1-800-LIFENET.
  • If your partner, or anyone, is hurting you or your children, call 311 and ask for the City’s confidential Domestic Violence Hotline. Counselors are available 24 hours a day to provide immediate help.

The Health Department’s Bureau of Vital Statistics compiles baby name lists from birth certificates. Each year, the list of most popular baby names is published in the agency’s Vital Statistics information. For more information on baby names or on NYC’s births and pregnancies, visit the Vital Statistics link on the Health Department’s website. New Yorkers can also visit www.nyc.gov for information on obtaining a birth certificate. 

You can help Valentina


| tcimino@queenscourier.com

Valentina

When Valentina Priolo, now four, was only three months old, she began having seizures.

Her mom, Raquel, who had suffered complications when giving birth to Valentina and her fraternal twin Isabella, became concerned and immediately sought help for her little girl.

“They called it immature neurological development,” Raquel told The Courier.

At six months, as the seizures continued, Valentina was diagnosed with epilepsy and low muscle tone. She was put on medications.

“She didn’t hit any of her milestones,” said Raquel, who lives with her family in Belle Harbor. “She couldn’t sit up, she was rolling her head. She never slept.”

A sleep disorder clinic said that Valentina had sleep apnea and cerebral palsy.

It was on July 30 of last year – Raquel’s birthday – that the family got the news: Valentina has Rett Syndrome.

According to the International Rett Syndrome Foundation, the disease is “a unique developmental disorder that is first recognized in infancy and seen almost always in girls . . . It has been most often misdiagnosed as autism, cerebral palsy, or non-specific developmental delay. Rett Syndrome causes problems in brain function that are responsible for cognitive, sensory, emotional, motor and autonomic function. These can include learning, speech, sensory sensations, mood, movement, breathing, cardiac function, and even chewing, swallowing, and digestion.”

Raquel, who said there are only 2,000 children with Rett in the New York area and that it is “very misdiagnosed,” was devastated, especially, she said, since the doctor made the diagnosis without the results of blood tests, which later confirmed.

“The doctor said she’s going to lose all abilities, all motor function,” she said. “When I was pregnant we were talking ballet, now we were talking helmets and feeding tubes.

“I was depressed for a long time,” continued Raquel, who said that Valentina can speak and walk with orthotics, though she does fall a lot. “We googled it to death and found the only doctor in the area to deal with Rett Syndrome. She is an amazing woman who gave us hope.”

And that has translated into a cause.

“I now have hope that I can give my daughter everything and she will have a full life,” said Raquel. “I feel that way because I have met other moms with Rett angels who fight for the cure. Through fundraising and support from friends and family all over the world, we, along with hundreds of other families, have made a difference in raising awareness.”

In her efforts, Raquel was told of Joe Mure, who is extremely involved with the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation and hosts numerous events a year to support that cause.

“We went to Joe looking for a simple donation but came out with a fundraiser,” remarked Raquel, who was touched by his willingness to help.

“She is a beautiful little girl,” said Mure, who will be hosting a “Halloween Spooktacular” fundraiser at his home, 144-03 Neponsit Avenue in Neponsit Beach, on Sunday October 23 from 5 to 7 p.m.

“We want to create awareness for the disease,” said Mure. “I just couldn’t sit idly by.”

The event, he said, will feature food, candy, music, entertainment, rides, even the original Adam West Batmobile.

Proceeds will go to Montefiore and the Rett Syndrome Research Foundation (RSRT).

“Be aware that 97 percent of every dollar raised for RSRT will be invested in the best possible science and data gathered from Rett research and will have ramifications for a broad spectrum of disorders including autism, schizophrenia and cancer,” said Raquel.

And Mure said that there will be a donation box outside his home through Halloween.

“When we hear researchers say they believe treatments and or a cure will be discovered within the next 10 years, we believe them,” said Raquel.