Tag Archives: Hunters Point South

Real estate roundup: Hunter’s Point South affordable housing developers throwing a party


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Related Companies

Party at the Site Where $500-a-Month Apartments Are Rising in Hunters Point

Residents interested in applying for one of the hundreds of affordable apartments in the first phase of Hunters Point South can check out the neighborhood next week at a party being thrown by the developers.” Read more [DNAinfo]

Near $4 million Douglaston mansion most expensive listing in Queens

A nine-bedroom mansion on 234th Street was the priciest Queens home put on the market last month. [The Real Deal]

Forest Hills residents think their beloved Bonelle Pastry Shop is worth fighting for  

“Queens cookie fans are crumbling at the news that a beloved borough bakery is closing at the end of the year — possibly due to an incoming Dunkin Donuts. Bonelle Pastry Shop in Forest Hills will lose its lease at the end of December after serving up its specialty cakes and almond croissants for more than 20 years, shop owner Rahita Ravel said.” Read more [The New York Daily News]

City Living: Rego park is as Queens as it gets

“The neighborhood is characterized by its main arteries of Queens Boulevard, Junction Boulevard, 63rd Drive and Woodhaven Boulevard – pulsing with retail and culinary activity — juxtaposed with quiet residential streets featuring picturesque Tudor homes.” Read more [amNewYork]

 

Developer TF Cornerstone to be honored for role in transforming LIC  


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of TF Cornerstone

TF Cornerstone has been one of the main faces in the real estate development boom currently occurring in Long Island City.

Recently, the real estate firm completed its 10-year, $1.4 billion Center Boulevard project, which includes six residential towers on the LIC waterfront with unobstructed views of the Manhattan skyline that provide a high-quality living space for a community of more than 6,000 people.

TF Cornerstone was also selected to develop two residential towers for the second phase of the city’s Hunter’s Point South affordable housing project, further bringing more residential opportunity to the neighborhood. The buildings will have 1,193 apartments, 796 of which will be affordable. The towers will also feature a gym, rooftop gardens and decks, and an on-site senior recreational center.

Because of these investments in the neighborhood, the Long Island City Partnership, an organization that focuses on fostering economic growth in the community, will honor the founding brothers of TF Cornerstone, K. Thomas and Frederick Elghanayan, at its 27th annual luncheon on Nov 13.

“We’ve come to love this community as we’ve watched it grow and, for that reason, receiving this award is truly special,” the Elghanayan brothers said. “We’d like to thank the Long Island City Partnership for this honor, and we’re looking forward to many more years of partnerships with groups and individuals in LIC as we begin our next chapter of development in Hunter’s Point South.”

Aside from constructing towers, TF Cornerstone has played a major role in building the community aspects of LIC through supporting local events and institutions, such as the LIC Flea, LIC Arts Open and P.S. 78 and developing Gantry Plaza State Park.

“They’ve been part of that revolutionary vision of what LIC can be as a residential neighborhood,” said Elizabeth Lusskin, president of the LIC Partnership. “People who were attracted to the dollar value now want to stay here for the community value, and that is a testament to the Elghanayans and TF Cornerstone.”

Hundreds of attendees are expected to attend the luncheon, which will be held at Astoria World Manor.

Kenneth Adams, president and CEO of Empire State Development, will give the keynote speech and Community Board 2 Chairman Joseph Conley will receive the William D. Modell Community Service Award.

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Real estate roundup: 25K applications for Hunter’s Point South, new Court Square Dunkin’ Donuts sign revealed


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Rendering courtesy of Related Companies

Hunter’s Point Affordable Housing Lottery Draws 25,000+ Applications In First Week

“Since the affordable housing lottery for Hunter’s Point South, a two-tower development in Long Island City, launched on October 15, approximately 25,000 people have applied, according to Councilman Jimmy Van Bramer. Ultimately, the development will house some 925 low- and moderate-income families, a significant number, but far below the evident demand in the area.” Read more [The New York Observer]

Signage up for Dunkin Donuts at 44-80 21st Street

“Dunkin’ Donuts officially announced its impending arrival with signage.” Read more [The Court Square Blog]

Build it back ‘starting to change the lives’ of Sandy victims: Mayor

“Set against the backdrop of a cerulean sky fighting through blankets of cotton-ball clouds, Mayor Bill de Blasio on Monday talked about one of the city’s darkest Mondays two years ago, the day Broad Channel nearly drowned.” Read more [The Forum]

 

Hunter’s Point South buildings now accepting affordable income housing applications


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Photos and charts courtesy of Related

Starting Wednesday, people who want to live in the affordable housing apartments at the Hunter’s Point South developments can start applying through NYC Housing Connect or by mail.

There will be a 60-day period during which people can apply, after which a lottery will be held and prospective residents will be notified in early 2015. Residents are expected to start being placed by next year.

Hundreds of people packed informational meetings in recent weeks to learn about the buildings, which are being developed by Related Companies, Phipps Houses and Monadnock Development, and designed by SHoP Architects. 

“The interest was overwhelmingly positive and the amount of interest was really off the charts,” said Frank Monterisi, a senior vice president at the Related Companies, about the forums. 

Of the more than 900 units that will be available in the developments — 32-story Hunter’s Point South Crossing and 37-story Hunter’s Point South Commons — 186 units, or about 20 percent, will be low-income housing, and 738 apartments will be moderate- and middle-income housing.

Studio, one-, two- and three-bedroom apartments will be available for all of those income levels. Low-income rental prices start from $494 for a studio and max out at $959 per month for a three-bedroom, while eligible incomes range from about $19,000 to approximately $49,000 annually. Rents for middle- and moderate-income units range from $1,561 to $4,346 per month for household incomes of $55,200 to $224,020 annually.

HUNTERS POINT RENTS

Most apartments will be reserved for residents already in the neighborhood, city workers or people with disabilities. The buildings will reserve 50 percent of the apartments for people living within Community Board 2, 7 percent for those with mobility or hearing disabilities or those who are visually impaired, and 5 percent for city employees.

Although the apartments cater to low and moderate income families, the buildings feature views of the Manhattan skyline and many amenities, including a 24-hour attended lobby, on-site manager and staff, a party room, an outdoor terrace, a fitness center, a playroom, a bike room and an outdoor community garden.

“We basically look to build the same quality of amenities in our other housing projects,” Monterisi said. “Those are things people want.”

There will also be 250 parking spaces on a first-come, first-served basis for an additional fee.

HUNTERS POINT STEPS

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Big turnout at first Hunter’s Point South affordable housing forum


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of NYC EDC

Judging from the turnout of the first Hunter’s Point South affordable housing forum on Monday, apartments in the Long Island City waterfront properties are likely to be filled quickly.

More than 200 people packed the Sunnyside Community Services room on 39th Street, seeking information about apartments in the buildings, which will start accepting applications on Oct. 15 for 60 days, leading officials to close the doors because of a potential fire hazard — a good sign, they said.

Dozens of people, who formed a line outside the building, were turned away and told about upcoming affordable housing forums.

“This speaks to how many people want to live in this community, they want to stay in this community, but the affordable housing piece is really important to them,” Councilman Jimmy Van Bramer said. “This [project] is going to allow a lot of folks to stay in this community. I’m really happy with this turnout.”

The Forum

THE COURIER/Photo by Liam La Guerre

Of the more than 900 units that will be available in the first two buildings of the development — 32-story Hunter’s Point South Crossing and 37-story Hunter’s Point South Commons — 186 units, or about 20 percent, will be low-income housing, and 738 apartments will be moderate- and middle-income housing.

HUNTERS POINT INCOME SLIDE

Brand-new studio, one-, two- and three-bedroom apartments will be available for all of those income levels.

Low-income rental prices start from $494 for a studio and max out at $959 per month for a three-bedroom, while eligible incomes range from about $19,000 to approximately $49,000 annually.

Rents for middle- and moderate-income units range from $1,561 to $4,346 per month for household incomes of $55,200 to $224,020 annually.

HUNTERS POINT RENTS

Most apartments will be reserved for residents already in the neighborhood, city workers or people with disabilities.

The buildings will give 50 percent preference to applications living within Community Board 2, 7 percent preference to those with mobility or hearing disabilities or those who are visually impaired, and 5 percent for city employees.

 

Pets are allowed in the buildings. However, they are limited to 75 pounds each.

Potential residents should register with NYC Housing Connect as soon as possible to create an application profile and visit the Hunter’s Point South website for more information. Following the 60-day period during which residents can apply, a lottery of applications received through Housing Connect will be held and prospective residents will be notified in early 2015. The buildings expect to start placing residents next year.

Charts

The apartments feature views of the Manhattan skyline and various amenities, including a 24-hour attended lobby, on-site manager and staff, a party room, an outdoor terrace, a fitness center, a playroom, a bike room and an outdoor community garden. There will be 250 parking spaces on a first-come, first-served basis for an additional fee.

Two more affordable housing forums will be held on Oct. 1 at 7 p.m. at Big Six Towers, and Oct. 6 at 7 p.m. at Academy for Careers in Film & TV.

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Authorized construction of Queens residential units jumps in 2013


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Renderings courtesy of NYC Mayors Office's Flickr

Building is booming in the borough.

The city’s Department of Buildings (DOB) authorized construction of 18,095 residential units in 1,383 buildings in 2013, a 71 percent increase from the previous year, according to a New York Building Congress (NYBC) analysis.

Queens experienced the largest percentage jump.

The area went from 1,529 units in 2012 to 3,161 in 2013—an increase of 107 percent.

According to the analysis, the gain was largely impacted by the start of construction of the Hunters Point South affordable housing project in Long Island City.

The report also found that in Queens 72 percent of the permitted buildings were for one- or two-family residences, and the estimated cost of construction per unit reached $102,500.

The NYBC said that last year, for the first time since 2008, the number of housing units authorized by the DOB increased in each of the five boroughs, but residential permits “remain far below the levels attained between 2005 and 2008.”

“With most of the recent talk centered on the recent boom in ultra-luxury Manhattan residential towers, it is certainly encouraging to see that momentum is quietly building in each of the five boroughs,” NYBC President Richard T. Anderson said.  “The key to the city’s success rests in part on our ability to produce a wide range of housing options that are tailored to meet the needs of a population as diverse as New York.”

 

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Astoria and LIC among Queens stops recommended for East River Ferry expansion


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Photo Courtesy of the East River Ferry

Queens could be the big winner from an expansion of the East River Ferry service if the city can find a spare $80 million to expand existing infrastructure and a private ferry company willing to pony up $10 million a year to run it.

The New York City Economic Development Corporation (NYCEDC) released its preliminary 2013 Citywide Ferry Study earlier this week, in which it considered 58 potential new ferry stops, including some based on community recommendations, for the East River.

In the end, the NYCEDC recommended 11 possible spots. The areas in Queens include Astoria Cove, Long Island City North, and Beach 108th and 116th Street in the Rockaways, according to the report. Ferry service was also recommended looked into for LaGuardia Airport.

“In the span of only a few years, ferry service has become an integral part of the City’s transportation infrastructure, serving millions of passengers and providing momentum for continued development along the City’s waterfront,” said NYCEDC President Kyle Kimball.

According to the report, these new routes would require “considerable capital and operating subsidies” and an expanded new network featuring the East River Ferry and the additional routes would require “an annual subsidy for weekday service of close to $10 million.”

The potential new stops would also require additional capital investment to construct docking stations which feature shelters, ticketing machines, benches, bike racks, and two-slip or single-slip barges.

Following the recent study, the possible ferry service expansion proposal will now be reviewed by local elected officials, leaders, private ferry companies and the community at large in order to discuss the specific new routes and how to fund them.

Currently the only East River Ferry stop in Queens is by Hunter’s Point South Park in Long Island City between 54th Avenue and 2nd Street.

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What’s new in Long Island City


| smosco@queenscourier.com

2 HUNTERS POINT RENDERw

No matter what time of year it is and what holiday is upon us, new developments in the neighborhood never cease. New restaurants, businesses, praise and that Hunters Point South project continue to move forth.

Here’s just a few items to come through recently:
Chocomize, a maker of chocolate bars that can be customized with over 100 topping options, recently relocated to LIC. After outgrowing their second space, they came to LIC to expand.

Rockrose Development Corporation recently announced that they will construct a 42-story, 709 unit residential rental building at 43-10 Crescent Street. Linc LIC, the first of a four building projects, will be completed in 2013.

The current owner of the Citibank Tower at One Court Square will sell the property to Waterbridge Capital. The sale price has been estimated to be $500 million.

Three new restaurants have opened in LIC in the last few weeks. Bear, featuring Eastern European influenced dishes with farm-to-table ingredients, is located at 12-14 31st Avenue.

Skinny’s Cantina, 47-05 Center Boulevard, is now serving Mexican dishes and cocktails and Alobar, which boasts craft beers and modern comfort food with an emphasis on seasonal and local ingredients, is located at 46-42 Vernon Boulevard.

LIC-based Quadlogic Controls Corp is the winner of the Wall Street Journal “Small Business, Big Innovation” award for its new product that attacks the environmentally unfriendly, costly and growing problem of electricity theft in various international markets.

Developments are still underway at Hunters Point South. The City of New York continues work on the Hunter’s Point South project, a waterfront development on a 30‐acre parcel of land in LIC that is bounded by 50th Avenue, 2nd Street, Newtown Creek and the East River. As part of the project, the New York City Economic Development Corporation (NYCEDC) continues infrastructure installation (sanitary and storm sewers, water mains, roadways, curbs, and sidewalks). Construction of a 10‐acre waterfront park will start this month. It will include a playground, dog run, and large “green” that will serve as a place for active recreation as well as passive uses.

INFRASTRUCTURE CONSTRUCTION
Work Initiated/Completed During October
• Continuation of dewatering to allow for ongoing subsurface construction
• Backfilling of former 2nd Street water tunnel, south of 50th Avenue
• Continuation of installation of sanitary sewer system:
• 2nd Street, 50th Avenue to south of Borden Avenue
• Installation of storm sewer system
• 2nd Street, Borden Avenue south toward 54th Avenue
• Construction of chambers for 48” and 42” Combined Sewer Outfall (CSO) system at East River and upland chambers
• Continuation of relocation of existing/installation of new Con Edison utility structures (primarily west side of 2nd Street and north side of Borden Avenue, east of 2nd Street).
- Courtesy of the NYCEDC