Tag Archives: hot

Fourth heat wave bakes city


| brennison@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Terence M. Cullen

New Yorkers will have to deal with two more days of temperatures approaching 100 degrees before getting a break from the sweltering weather.

Stifling heat will blanket the area over the next two days as temperatures are expected to hover in the mid-90s today. High humidity will make the climate feel closer to 100 degrees.  Wednesday temperatures will near 100 with the heat index near 105.

Click here for a list of free pools in Queens

this is the fourth heat wave this season that has had 16 days of temperatures above 90 degrees this year.

The National Weather Service (NWS) has issued an excessive heat advisory for the potentially dangerous hot spell. The advisory will last through tomorrow night.

Heat is the number one weather-related killer in the United States, resulting in hundreds of fatalities each year, the NWS said.

Tips to keep your pets safe in the heat

Cooling centers will be open throughout the city tomorrow offering an escape from the sweltering heat. Click here to find the one nearest you. 

Cooling centers are air conditioned places, such as Department for the Aging senior centers, Salvation Army community centers, and public libraries that are open to the public during heat emergencies.

 

Record high temperatures expected in Queens


| brennison@queenscourier.com

File photo

Less than a month into summer, New York City is already in the midst of its third heat wave with triple digit temperatures still on the way.

Temperatures are expected to hit 100 tomorrow — which would match the record high — with the heat index closer to 110. Average temperatures for this time of year are in the mid 80s.

The last time LaGuardia Airport reached 100 degrees was July 22 of last year.

Click here for a list of free pools in Queens

Queens has already recorded more than 10 days with temperatures above 90 this year.

The National Weather Service (NWS) has issued an excessive heat watch for the potentially dangerous hot spell.

Heat is the number one weather-related killer in the United States, resulting in hundreds of fatalities each year, according to the NWS.

Tips to keep your pets safe in the heat

Cooling centers will be open throughout the city tomorrow offering an escape from the sweltering heat. Click here to find the one nearest you. 

Cooling centers are air conditioned places, such as Department for the Aging senior centers, Salvation Army community centers, and public libraries that are open to the public during heat emergencies.

The city’s Office of Emergency Management has offered some tips to staying cool:

New Yorkers should heed the following tips to stay cool during this week’s extreme heat:

• Use an air conditioner if you have one.

• If you do not have an air conditioner, go to a cooler place such as a store, mall, museum, movie theater, or friend/family member’s air-conditioned home, or visit a cooling center.

• Check on your at-risk family, friends and neighbors often and help them get to a cool place.

• Use a fan only when the air conditioner is on or the windows are open. Fans alone will not keep you cool when it is really hot outside. Fans work best at night to bring in cooler air from outside.

• Drink plenty of water or other fluids, even if you don’t feel thirsty. Avoid beverages containing alcohol, caffeine or high amounts of sugar.

• Never leave children, pets or those who require special care in a parked car.

• Avoid strenuous activity, or plan it for the coolest part of the day, usually in the morning between 4 AM and 7 AM or in the evening. If you exercise, drink two to four glasses of cool, nonalcoholic fluids each hour. A sports beverage can replace the salt and minerals you lose in sweat. If you are used to regular exercise, just keep in mind the symptoms of heat illness when exercising and stop or rest if any occur.

• Be careful if you take a cold shower to stay cool – sudden temperature changes can make you feel dizzy or sick.

 

Heat wave continues to bake city, relief may be on the way


| brennison@queenscourier.com

File photo

New Yorkers have one more day of suffocating heat before temperatures return to near normal.

After two day of heat approaching 100 degrees, today’s temperature is forecasted to stay in the mid-90s.

Thunderstorms are forecasted to begin late this afternoon.  This weekend temperatures are expected to fall back into the 80s.

The National Weather Service has issued another heat advisory that will remain in effect until 7 p.m.

If possible, residents should avoid strenuous activities as much as possible in the heat.

The city has again opened up hundreds of cooling centers in the five boroughs.

Cooling centers are air conditioned places, such as Department for the Aging senior centers, Salvation Army community centers, and public libraries that are open to the public during heat emergencies.

Click here to find the cooling center nearest to you

The heat is also still affecting many residents electricity. More than a dozen Queens neighborhoods face a 5 percent voltage reduction and more than 200 residents are without power.

“The idea is to prevent a larger scale problem,” a Con Ed spokesperson said about the reduction. “It takes pressure off the system while the issue is repaired.”

The voltage reduction is due to problems with electrical equipment.

The neighborhoods affected are Auburndale, Bayside, Broad Channel, College Point, Douglaston, Howard Beach, Kew Gardens, Lindenwood, Little Neck, Murray Hill, Ozone Park, Queensborough Hill, Richmond Hill, South Ozone Park, Whitestone and Woodhaven.

 

More records highs expected today


| brennison@queenscourier.com

File photo

Another day, another scorcher.

After record high temperatures baked the city yesterday, residents should be ready for even more heat.

Temperatures will again approach 100 degrees, and feel closer to 110.

The National Weather Service (NWS) has issued a heat advisory.

Those who will be outdoors should take extra precautions.  Wear light, loose fitting clothing, sunblock and drink plenty of water.

The city has again opened up hundreds of cooling centers in the five boroughs.

Cooling centers are air conditioned places, such as Department for the Aging senior centers, Salvation Army community centers, and public libraries that are open to the public during heat emergencies.

Click here to find the cooling center nearest to you

The city’s Office of Emergency Management has offered some tips to staying cool:

New Yorkers should heed the following tips to stay cool during this week’s extreme heat:

  • Use an air conditioner if you have one.
  • If you do not have an air conditioner, go to a cooler place such as a store, mall, museum, movie theater, or friend/family member’s air-conditioned home, or visit a cooling center.
  • Check on your at-risk family, friends and neighbors often and help them get to a cool place.
  • Use a fan only when the air conditioner is on or the windows are open. Fans alone will not keep you cool when it is really hot outside. Fans work best at night to bring in cooler air from outside.
  • Drink plenty of water or other fluids, even if you don’t feel thirsty. Avoid beverages containing alcohol, caffeine or high amounts of sugar.
  • Never leave children, pets or those who require special care in a parked car.
  • Avoid strenuous activity, or plan it for the coolest part of the day, usually in the morning between 4 AM and 7 AM or in the evening. If you exercise, drink two to four glasses of cool, nonalcoholic fluids each hour. A sports beverage can replace the salt and minerals you lose in sweat. If you are used to regular exercise, just keep in mind the symptoms of heat illness when exercising and stop or rest if any occur.
  • Be careful if you take a cold shower to stay cool – sudden temperature changes can make you feel dizzy or sick.

 

Keep your pets safe in the extreme heat


| brennison@queenscourier.com

dog park3w

The 100 degree heat does not affect only humans, but pets as well.

Pet owners should take steps to ensure their pets remain cool and safe.

“It is imperative that pet owners take precautions and special care of their pets in the next few days,” said Dr. Steven Fox, president and CEO of Central Veterinary Associates. “The hot weather and dehydration can have serious effects on your pet’s health so it is essential to provide your pet with fresh water at all times and maintain a comfortable environment further.”

Central Veterinary Associates has offered some tips to help keep pets safe as the temperature rises:

● Look for signs of heat stroke in your pet — Because of their fur, pets are more susceptible to heat stroke. Signs of heat stroke in pets include a body temperature between 104 and 110 degrees, excessive panting, tongue and gums that are sticky and a dark or bright red color, staggering, stupor or seizures. In extreme cases, heat stroke for pets may result in bloody diarrhea, coma or death.

● Avoid strenuous exercise when it’s really hot outside — The hottest part of the day is between noon and 4 p.m., so that would not be a good time to take your pet for a walk. It is better to exercise your pet either in the early mornings or evenings when the heat is less intense. Also, avoid walking your pet on asphalt or sand, as the hot surface temperature may burn their paws.

● Maintain your pet’s water supply — Always provide a bowl of clean, fresh water for your pet, both inside and outside. Keeping your pet properly hydrated will improve their health and prevent illness.

● Do not leave pets in a home without air conditioning — Without air conditioning, indoor temperatures will reach uncomfortable and often dangerously high levels. Always keep the air conditioning and any fans on for your pets.

● Do not leave pets in a car for any reason — Leaving your pet in a parked car can be a deadly mistake. Even with the windows open, temperatures will rapidly climb to a dangerous level. Leaving your pet unattended in a car will expose them to heat stroke, dehydration, brain damage, suffocation and ultimately death.

 

First day of summer brings record heat


| brennison@queenscourier.com

File photo

Summer did not waste any time getting started.

Temperatures are forecasted to approach 100 degrees, and feel even hotter, on the first day of summer.

It has been 80 years since New York City approached these temperatures on June 20.

Because of the combination of the heat and humidity, the National Weather Service has issued a excessive heat warning for Queens.  Temperatures, which are predicted to hit 98, will feel like 108.

Those who will be outdoors should take extra precautions.  Wear light, loose fitting clothing, sunblock and drink plenty of water.

The city has also opened up hundreds of cooling centers in the five boroughs.

Cooling centers are air conditioned places, such as Department for the Aging senior centers, Salvation Army community centers, and public libraries that are open to the public during heat emergencies.

Click here to find the cooling center nearest to you

The city’s Office of Emergency Management has offered some tips to staying cool:

New Yorkers should heed the following tips to stay cool during this week’s extreme heat:

  • Use an air conditioner if you have one.
  • If you do not have an air conditioner, go to a cooler place such as a store, mall, museum, movie theater, or friend/family member’s air-conditioned home, or visit a cooling center.
  • Check on your at-risk family, friends and neighbors often and help them get to a cool place.
  • Use a fan only when the air conditioner is on or the windows are open. Fans alone will not keep you cool when it is really hot outside. Fans work best at night to bring in cooler air from outside.
  • Drink plenty of water or other fluids, even if you don’t feel thirsty. Avoid beverages containing alcohol, caffeine or high amounts of sugar.
  • Never leave children, pets or those who require special care in a parked car.
  • Avoid strenuous activity, or plan it for the coolest part of the day, usually in the morning between 4 AM and 7 AM or in the evening. If you exercise, drink two to four glasses of cool, nonalcoholic fluids each hour. A sports beverage can replace the salt and minerals you lose in sweat. If you are used to regular exercise, just keep in mind the symptoms of heat illness when exercising and stop or rest if any occur.
  • Be careful if you take a cold shower to stay cool – sudden temperature changes can make you feel dizzy or sick.

City to approach record high temperature today


| brennison@queenscourier.com

SOCRATES SCULPTURE PARK1

In a year that has already set a number of all-time high temperatures, the city is again bracing for record heat today, as temperatures will approach 90 degrees.

Today’s forecasted high of 88, is more than 25 degrees higher than the average high time of year; last year’s high temperature was 55.

The highest temperature of the year is also the highest resident have dealt with since August of last year.

The record high for this date was set ten years ago, when temperatures hit 92 on the thermometer.

Warm temperatures and sunny skies are sure to send many residents outside today, but with the high heat comes high pollen counts. Pollen.com has the pollen level at 11.8 out of a possible 12 today.

The National Weather Service (NWS) has also issued a warning for an increased risk of brush fires for the city due to the combination of dry conditions, heat and wind.

The temperature is forecasted to drop to 78 tomorrow, with highs later in the week more in line with seasonal temperatures.