Tag Archives: High School

High school brings colorful posters to Queens businesses


| ejankiewicz@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/ Photo by Eric Jankiewicz


A local high school is designing posters and fliers for independent Glendale and Ridgewood businesses.


Andrew Drozd teaches three art and design classes at the Academy of Urban Planning in Bushwick where students work with local businesses in Brooklyn and Queens to apply design techniques to real world applications like advertisement.

“This is something that’s still in its infancy but we’re learning,” Drozd said.

“Students appreciate what they’re learning if there’s a real value attached to it.”

He first started the class this semester in April. The design exercise was meant to only last a couple of weeks.

“And now here we are, nearing the end of the school year and my students are still passionate about it,” Drozd said. “There’s been such an outpouring of support from the local business communities.”

Jesse Ibrahim owns Roma Deli in Glendale. He displays a huge poster at the entrance of his store.  The poster has pastel colors that frame a picture of the deli-front in the center. On the bottom right corner it says, “This poster was created by Jocelyn Perez a student at the Academy of Urban Planning.”

“I love it,” said Ibrahim, who has owned the deli for almost 15 years.  “Now my entrance is brightened. It’s very presentable.”

Ibrahim was first approached by Drozd two weeks ago and was then given an option of about 15 different poster designs all made by separate students.

“So there’s a level of competition,” Drozd said.

In Ridgewood, Armand Baklajan was expecting his poster any day now when it would be hand-delivered by Drozd.

“This is fantastic work,” he said, holding a sketch of his yet-to-be completed poster. “I wish I had such a motivated and passionate teacher when I was in high school.”

Drozd said that he has about 40 other businesses lined up for future posters. He first came up with the idea when he noticed that so many delis have hand-written signs advertising things like breakfast sandwiches.

“So there’s an element of social justice in this. We’re providing a service to people who could really benefit from it,” he said.

Each class produces about three posters a week using design programs and pictures. Drozd expects the work to continue through the summer and next school year the design exercise will be introduced to another batch of students.

“We’re going to ride this until it crashes,” he said.

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Cambria Heights high school scholar set to graduate in three years


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Rosmary Reyes

Follow me @liamlaguerre

While most high school students are happy to leave school when the bell rings, Rosmary Reyes takes extra classes, which sometimes keep her as late as 6 p.m.

Now that extra time is about to pay off.

Reyes, a student at Business, Computer Applications & Entrepreneurship High School in Cambria Heights, is set to graduate after just three years.

“I feel like as soon as I get out of high school, I can get into the real world and closer to my dream of being a lawyer,” Reyes said. “The faster the better.”

Reyes, 16, maintains a 91 percent average in school, is a member of Arista, the National Honor Society, and is in the running to be her school’s valedictorian or salutatorian. She speaks fluent Spanish, and also knows American Sign Language, which Reyes learned so she could communicate with her deaf cousins.

Besides her academics, Reyes participates in a great deal of extracurricular activities and volunteer work.

She is president of the school’s student government, editor of the yearbook, a member of the journalism and the recycling clubs, and she also tutors students who need help in specific subjects. Reyes volunteers at the annual high school fair for eighth-graders and the college fair.

Outside school, Reyes is a New York Cares team leader and has volunteered to help many causes, including working in a soup kitchen and taking part in a coat drive for a senior citizens home.

“It’s not just for academic achievement or looking better for my resume,” Reyes said. “I like [volunteering] because I want to do it. I like helping people and being in leadership roles.”

Even before high school, Reyes was an exceptional student. She received student of the month and student of the year awards from M.S. 61. Reyes pushes herself to do more, because of her philosophy to stay motivated.

“When you are tired and just want to give up, you should just stop for a moment and imagine what you can achieve if you try just a little bit more,” Reyes said.

But her ideals aside, Reyes recognized that she wouldn’t have been able to achieve all of her accomplishments without her family as a backbone of support.

“[I] give thanks to my parents for always giving me the resources I need, and my sister for always giving me the push I need to achieve my goals.”

Reyes is now waiting to hear from St. John’s University, where she plans to continue her education. She then wants to go to law school to become a civil litigator or human rights lawyer.

“I always found a true passion in it,” Reyes said. “The thing I like about lawyers is that they get to help people who may not be able to help themselves.”

 

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Queens students bridge the generation gap using makeovers


| mchan@queenscourier.com

Photos courtesy of GlamourGals and by William Mebane

Using makeup and nail polish, hundreds of Queens teens are bridging the gap between two generations.

Nearly 185 high school students in the borough have joined in a nonprofit’s cause to provide friendship and free makeovers to women living in senior homes.

The after-school leadership program, GlamourGals Foundation, Inc., has spread to 83 chapters in the country, including seven high schools in Queens.

“We’re bringing together two fragile populations,” said Kavita Mehra, vice president of GlamourGals. “Our volunteers come back to us and constantly share what they’ve learned from the seniors and their experiences.

We’re building compassionate, young leaders who are making a positive difference in their community.”

The teens visit local nursing homes and senior centers at least once a month for community service credit, Mehra said. They give hand massages, file down and paint nails, and apply foundation, blush and lipstick using clean, hypoallergenic materials supplied by the organization.

“What young woman doesn’t love nail polish and what older woman doesn’t love to be pampered? It’s a great way to start a conversation,” Mehra said. “It’s something about the human touch that can break immediate barriers.”

Eghosa Asemota, 19, a former Queens chapter president, said the program transformed her life after a traumatic car accident left a scar on her face.

“Before I joined GlamourGals, I was a quiet girl. I walked with my head down,” said the Ozone Park resident. “The more I visited nursing homes, the bolder I got. I was able to build that confidence again.”

Asemota, now a sophomore at Adelphi University, led the chapter at Thomas A. Edison High School, which boasts nearly 100 volunteers, in her senior year. The seniors, she said, became her own family.

“My grandparents live in Nigeria. I don’t necessarily get to speak with them a lot. Having these elderly women filled the void of a special grandmother,” she said. “I was able to give them a purpose, and they gave me a purpose.”

GlamourGals was established 13 years ago. Since then, its programs have spread to the Academy of American Studies, Thomas A. Edison, Townsend Harris, Robert F. Kennedy, Forest Hills, Flushing, and Cardozo high schools in Queens.

The organization also awards a select group of volunteers yearly with $1,000 scholarships and paid fellowships.

“We help them develop their fullest potential, and for the elderly, we demonstrate that they are not forgotten,” Mehra said.

 

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Immigrants finish high school at higher rates than U.S. born


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

A report recently released by the city’s Independent Budgetary Office (IBO) found that immigrant students graduate in four years at a slightly higher rate than U.S. born students, but those differences depend greatly on the foreign born student’s country of origin.

The IBO’s report tracked the graduation rates of the 89,750 students who were or would have been part of the class of 2009 at New York City public high schools.

Students from the Caribbean, South America, Mexico, Central America and U.S. Territories graduated at a rate lower than those born in the United States, but students from other parts of the world earned a greater percentage of diplomas.

“We’re pleased to see the positive graduation rates for immigrant students overall,” said Kim Sykes, manager of education advocacy for the New York Immigration Coalition.

But she was concerned that particular groups of immigrants had lower rates.

“The city needs to really ensure that all students get access to the services they need to acquire English proficiency,” said Sykes.

Also, she added, they need to have access to high-quality career and technical education programs, and have alternate paths to graduation that don’t include the state Regents exams.

Students at New York City public schools must pass those tests to graduate, which can be challenging for immigrant students who are trying to learn English, said Sykes.

One of the current activities that the New York Immigration Coalition is helping students with is the new policy that offers immigrants who entered the U.S. as children a way to remain in this country.

“I think [the new policy] is a meaningful incentive to stay in school,” said Sykes,

In addition to the gaps in immigrants from different areas of the world, there were also differences across racial lines.

Among immigrant students, whites had the highest graduation rate at 78.7 percent, but Asian students were only slightly lower at 74.6 percent.

U.S. born Asian students graduated at 87 percent, beating out white non-immigrant students by almost 10 percent.

Hispanic and black students graduated at a lower rate than white and Asian students in both categories, but the rate for black immigrant students was actually higher than their U.S. counterparts (68.3 versus 60.7 percent).

Hispanic immigrant students had the lowest graduation rate at 55.8 percent.

The IBO report was prompted by the large increase of graduation rates since the 2001-2002 school year. Before that time, they had barely changed since the mid-1980s when graduation rates were first reported.

In 2011, a record 65.5 percent of students graduated from high school, Mayor Michael Bloomberg and Schools Chancellor Dennis Walcott announced this June.

The Bloomberg administration has used these numbers to show the positive change the mayor has brought to the city’s public schools.

This sudden turnaround led to suspicions that the graduation rates were not what they seemed, and that some students who dropped out were actually being classified as “discharged.”

Discharged means a student left the New York City Public School system, but enrolled in another educational institution, such as a city private or parochial school, or in another public school district.

But the IBO found in its September 5 report that its calculations of graduation and dropout rates were close to what the Department of Education showed.

Seven Queens high schools close their doors for good


| brennison@queenscourier.com

august martinw

The final bell rang for the seven Queens Turnaround high schools as the last students passed through the doors of what the city graded as failing institutions.

Wednesday, June 27, marked the final day of class for August Martin, Flushing, John Adams, Long Island City, Newtown, Richmond Hill and William C. Bryant after the Panel for Educational Policy voted to close the schools in April. Seventeen other high schools around the city have also closed.

Under the Turnaround model, the schools will reopen in the fall under a new name with half the staff possibly replaced.

“I guess I’m happy that I’m the last graduating class of this high school but at the same time it’s disappointing because we’re not coming back and half of these teachers are not coming back at all,” said Newtown senior Adianes Dalle, fighting back tears. “I tried my best to keep it open… There’s no point in coming to visit because [the teachers] are not going to be here.”

The state’s Education Department approved the closings on Friday, June 22, saying they met New York’s requirements.

“I’m disappointed that I’m not going to finish my career here,” said Bryant teacher Mike Sherwood, who has been at the school for 20 years.

The Queens schools shutting their doors were all on the state’s list of Persistently Lowest Achieving (PLA) schools, and were receiving federal Race to the Top funding before negotiations broke down between the city and the United Federation of Teachers (UFT) on an evaluation system.

Flushing teacher Robert Pomeranz called the Turnaround “a trick by renaming and renumbering.”

“Next year, the new school won’t have statistics that will count for another three years. It is a trick by the mayor and his flunkies.”

By instituting the Turnaround model — a program which does not require teacher evaluations — the city was eligible to apply for up to $60 million in School Improvement Grant (SIG) funding from the state.

That funding has been provisionally approved by the state pending the outcome of arbitration.

“My conditional approval of these plans is contingent on the NYC DOE’s ability to meet the relevant staff replacement requirements, ongoing consultation and collaboration with stakeholders,” state Education Commissioner John King wrote in a letter to Chancellor Dennis Walcott.

The UFT filed a lawsuit in May saying the method of replacing teachers at the turnaround schools violated their contracts.

An arbitrator will determine if the DOE has properly staffed the turnaround schools.

If the arbitrator decides against the DOE — which says it is properly following the guidelines in the teachers’ contract — the department may revisit and consider additional staff from the closed school in order to receive SIG funds. The DOE said that the fact that the state education commissioner approved the closures will be brought the arbiter’s attention.

Though the federal funding is important to supporting the new institutions, the spokesperson said, the main mission of the turnaround plan was developing a strategy to improve student achievement.

Committees composed of representatives from the UFT and DOE will make the decision on whether former teachers meet the qualifications at the new school.

The final decisions on hirings cannot be made until after the arbitrator’s decision, the UFT said, which the union expects soon.

“No final personnel decisions involving these schools can be made until the arbitrator rules on the UFT’s contention that these are not really new schools,” a UFT spokesperson said.

— Additional reporting by Chris Brito

Grover Cleveland saved from closure


| brennison@queenscourier.com

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Hours before the Panel for Educational Policy meeting to decide the fate of 26 city schools, the Department of Education removed Grover Cleveland High School from the list ensuring its survival.

Under the turnaround model the Ridgewood school would have closed and reopened under a new name with up to half the teachers being replaced. Bushwick Community High School was also removed from the list.

“Over the past several weeks, during public hearings and visits from my senior leadership, we looked closely at schools whose performance and quality of instruction have shown positive signs in the last two years. We have come to believe that two of those schools – Grover Cleveland High School and Bushwick Community High School – have demonstrated an ability to continue their improvements without the more comprehensive actions that are clearly needed at 24 other schools,” Chancellor Dennis Walcott said in a statement.

The hearing on Monday, April 2 and the public comments given that night also played a role into the DOE’s decision to keep the school open.

“This news is a testament to the hard work of the school community, the students, parents and teachers and Principal [Denise] Vittor at Grover Cleveland,” said Councilmember Elizabeth Crowley. “I was proud to stand with the community protesting the turnaround model, and I am relieved the DOE has listened to common sense and will keep the school open. We must continue to fight for the remaining schools that are still slated for closure.”

Cleveland has shown improvement in recent years raising its graduation rate and being rated proficient on the quality review.

Twenty four other schools — seven in Queens — will have their fate determined tonight at the PEP meeting in Brooklyn.

 

Parents, students, staff say Closing Flushing High School ‘Not A Solution’


| mchan@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Melissa Chan

While graduation rates at Flushing High School have climbed over the years — and education officials praised some of the school’s “areas of strength” — the extra credit points may not be enough to save the embattled institution.

Hundreds of supporters — sporting anti-Mayor Bloomberg pins — packed Flushing’s auditorium to have their voices heard by the Department of Education (DOE) during an agency-hosted public hearing on April 16.

Flushing is one of 26 high schools on the updated list for Turnaround after seven were removed from the original list of 33 on April 2. If the school is turned around, it would close and reopen under a new name. The students at the school would be guaranteed a seat, and half the teachers would be replaced, according to the DOE.

“Closing the school is not a solution,” said Jenny Chen, who teaches Chinese at the school. “If they change 50 percent of the staff, then it’s going to create a disaster. The students know now where to find help, and they know who they can talk to. I feel angry, and I feel sorry for the students and parents. They don’t deserve that.”

DOE Deputy Chancellor David Weiner said closing and replacing Flushing with a new school would “create a school environment that will prepare students for success, college, work and life.”

The statement launched an avalanche of uproar amongst audience members — many of whom told The Courier they felt improvements made along the years have been overlooked or ignored.

Graduation rates at Flushing have risen from 54 percent in 2007 to 60 percent in 2010, according to the DOE’s report. The review also indicated “areas of strength” at the school, including Flushing’s ability to “maintain a culture of mutual trust and positive attitudes toward learning.”

However, the report states these elements do not particularly help keep the school open, but is instead “worth preserving” in the new school.

“With the new supports and restructuring available under the Turnaround model, we expect that the New School will be able to effectively leverage these areas of strength while improving student outcomes for all students,” the report stated.

James Manning, a junior at the school, said Flushing’s major problems stem from an “overwhelming” population of students who cut school every day, do drugs in the hallway and simply “choose not to learn.” He said this is at no fault to the teachers.

“No matter who you put in front of that classroom, they are still the same kids,” Manning, 16, said.

While senior Sun Lin is graduating as possibly Flushing’s last valedictorian, he said the real honor lies in having attended Flushing for four years — a school he now considers a second home.

“Seeing a home be destroyed is not what I want,” Lin said.

Some supporters said the DOE jumped the gun by already introducing the new school’s proposed principal — Magdalen Radovich — before the city’s Panel for Educational Policy even voted on the closure. The DOE Division of Portfolio Planning hosted the meeting on April 25, and the voting took place a day after on April 26. The Courier went to press before both events.

Thousands of Grover Cleveland supporters tell DOE to keep school open


| brennison@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Billy Rennison

More than 1,000 supporters packed Grover Cleveland High School’s auditorium to have their voices heard by Department of Education (DOE) officials. And as each of the more than 50 speakers stepped to the microphone, they made one thing clear — closing the school is not an option.

Grover Cleveland is one of 26 high schools on the list for Turnaround. Seven were removed from the original list of 33 on April 2.

If the Ridgewood school is turned around, it would close and reopen under a new name. The students at the school would be guaranteed a spot and half the teachers would be replaced.

“The students don’t want it, the parents don’t want it, the teachers don’t want it, the administrators don’t want it, our former principal doesn’t want it, our current principal doesn’t want it, only the DOE wants it,” said Russ Nitchman, a Grover Cleveland science teacher.

The DOE held a hearing at the school on Monday, April 2 to allow public comment on the proposed Turnaround.

“This evening is not a decision point,” said Deputy Chancellor Marc Sternberg. “We’re here to hear the voices of the community.”

Parents, students, teachers, former teachers and alumni all spoke, extolling the school’s place as their second home.

“It was Cleveland that helped give me a wide variety of experiences. I got to sing and dance, I wasn’t very good, I said I better be a politician,” said alumna and Assemblymember Cathy Nolan. “There were wonderful things here that gave me opportunity; opportunity to learn who I was.”

A steady stream of students stepped to the mic to relay stories of the teachers at the school changing their lives.

“The very staff that got us to this point is in jeopardy,” said Geline Canayon, a senior at the school and the student association president.

“Students are anxious and upset at the prospect of losing their favorite teacher, scrambling to get college recommendations before their teachers are forced out,” said Brian Gavin, the union rep at the school. “Concerned that during their all important senior and junior years they will have teachers that are inexperienced, don’t know them and their community leaving them unprepared for college and their careers.”

The fervent speakers’ zeal often carried them well past their two minute allotment during the more than three-and-a-half-hour meeting.

“It is time for Mayor Bloomberg to take his incompetent staff and get out of Ridgewood and leave the business of education to educators,” bellowed Arthur Goldstein, who came from Francis Lewis High School, where he is the school’s union rep to lend his support.

“I’m going to make a simple request, take Grover Cleveland off the list of turnaround schools,” said Senator Joseph Addabbo. “It’s not only an emotional request, it’s a fact based request.”

On its most recent DOE progress report Cleveland received a C, a year after earning a B. The graduation rate was 58 percent last year, seven points below the city wide average.

The high school was entered into the restart program in September which qualified it for School Improvement Grants (SIG), but because the UFT and DOE failed to come to an agreement on teacher evaluations, the money dried up and put Cleveland in line for Turnaround.

The restart model is meant for schools to receive support to improve and not be closed.

Had the two sides reached an agreement, the school would have continued its course in the restart program, a DOE spokesperson said.

“There is no educational justification for what the Department of Education is trying to do to you,” said Leo Casey, UFT vice president for high schools. “There is only one reason why such an educationally invalid step has been taken here, and that is because it serves the political agenda of Mayor [Michael] Bloomberg.”

As the hearing wound down at approximately 9:30 p.m. more than 100 supporters remained to make certain their comments were made public record.

“We teach our students that democracy works,” said teacher Donald Zigler. “Keep Cleveland open; the people have spoken.”

The final vote on the school’s future is scheduled for April 26.

 

Liu’s campaign treasurer busted in ‘straw donor’ scheme


| jlane@queenscourier.com

Graphic by Jay Lane

Liu’s campaign treasurer busted in ‘straw donor’ scheme: feds

Embattled city Comptroller John Liu’s campaign treasurer was busted today on charges she helped funnel illegal political donations into the Queens Democrat’s war chest. Jia “Jenny” Hou conspired to help wealthy Liu backers evade a $4,950 limit on individual contributions by using “straw donors” to pass along their money, according to the feds. Hou, 25, was allegedly caught offering to reimburse a crooked donation during a series of computer “instant messages” on July 14, and allegedly instructed campaign volunteers on how to make the contributions look legit. Read More: New York Post

 

Third student dies from Ohio high school shooting

The death toll rose to three Tuesday in the shooting rampage in an Ohio high school cafeteria as schoolmates and townspeople grappled with the tragedy and wondered what could have set the teenage gunman off. The teenager under arrest in Monday’s attack, T.J. Lane, faced an afternoon hearing in juvenile court. Shaken residents offered condolences and prayers to the families of those killed and wounded at 1,100-student Chardon High School in suburban Cleveland. All three of the dead were students. Read More: New York Post

 

Waitress claims veteran NYPD detective took advantage of her at Washington Heights restaurant

A waitress says her boss gave her $200 to party with some cops, protested when one put the moves on her in a back room, and then got her underwear back the next day. The 36-year-old woman, whose allegations prompted the NYPD to assign four cops to desk duty, thinks a veteran detective took advantage of her at the Washington Heights restaurant where she worked. But she admits she can’t remember it – because she blacked out. Read More: Daily News

 

Manningham ups odds to ’50-50′ he stays with Giants

Mario Manningham last week, back home in Ohio, was quoted in the Youngstown News that he believes there’s a 75 percent chance he will leave the Giants in free agency and sign elsewhere. Tuesday morning, he refuted that claim. “I didn’t say that,’’ Manningham said on WFAN. “You know how rumors get spread, I didn’t say anything like that.’’ Manningham then increased the odds of him staying with the Giants. Read More: New York Post

 

Ex-Girl Scout finance director gets 3 to 9 years for swiping $310K

The former finance director for the Girl Scout Council of Greater New York was sentenced today to three to nine years behind bars after she failed to return a large chunk of the $310,000 she allegedly embezzled over the course of two years. “I apologize for the situation,” said Yaasmin Hooey, 35, during her sentencing hearing in Manhattan Supreme Court. Prosecutors said Hooey stole the money by cashing or depositing into her personal bank account a series of 65 checks written off the Girl Scouts’ payroll account. Read More: New York Post

 

Names Of NYPD First Responders Added To Cancer Study

The names of tens of thousands of New York City POlice Department uniformed officers and civilian members who worked at the World Trade Center are now at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine. Mayor Michael Bloomberg handed over the names of 39,921 people, along with their job title, age, race, and gender on Monday. This comes after the city initially refused to turn over the information, because of privacy concerns. Mount Sinai is treating the first responders. Read More: NY1

Playoff Tipoff: First round hardwood action


| smosco@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photos by Steve Mosco

The Bayside Commodores (13-2) beat the John Adams Spartans (11-4) by a score of 61-41 in the first round of the Queens Borough Playoff Bracket. Though both teams traded blows with some intense back and forth action, Bayside had this game in the bag early. The Queens powerhouse started the contest with an 11-0 run and led at halftime 29-9. Bayside senior Uzonna Akazi led the Commodores to victory, leading all scorers with 23 points, while junior Brandon King contributed with 13 points of his own. Junior Vincent England added eight points and sophomore Daqauise Andrews led the team in assists with six to go along with six points and three rebounds. Senior Ryan Tomlin scored six points as well, while pulling down four rebounds. Senior Dillion Scurry led the team with six rebounds. For the Spartans, Markell French led the team with 13 points, while grabbing down six rebounds. Paul Johnson was second on the team with 12 points and junior Ahmed Kone scored six points while pulling down five rebounds. Senior Shane Hubbard was tied with French for second on the team with six rebounds and senior Yuhree Claude led the game with seven rebounds. Next up for the Commodores will be the Long Island City Bull Dogs.

The Bull Dogs (15-0) continued their winning ways, squeaking by the Beach Channel Dolphins (9-6) by a score of 45-43, advancing to the second round of the Queens Borough Playoffs. Senior Sadji Camara led the Bulldogs with 18 points and senior Arthur Santanna had a double-double with 10 points and 14 rebounds. Senior Kevin Green Jr. had eight points and seven rebounds while leading the team in assists with four.

The Benjamin Cardozo High School Judges blew out the High School for Construction Red Hawks by a score of 83-46. Tajay Henry led the team with a double-double, scoring 22 points while pulling down 13 rebounds. Junior Kyle Credle scored 13 points while leading the team with five assists. Junior Kendall Brown was third on the team with 11 points and senior Ryan Yearwood was one rebound shy of a double-double with 10 points. Junior Omar Williams scored 10 points as well. For the Red Hawks, senior Ehiavekhan Eromoselle led the team with a double-double, scoring 15 points and grabbing 10 rebounds. Senior Rudranauth Sewsankar had 10 points and seven rebounds. Junior Isaiah Henderson and Alexis Rincon each scored seven points. Next up for the judges will be the Campus Magnet Bull Dogs (12-3).

With additional reporting by Heather Zwillenberg

High School Basketball Roundup


| hzwillenberg@queenscourier.com

The Bayside Commodores lost a nail biter to the Benjamin Cardozo Judges by a score of 62-59. With the loss, the Commodores drop to 4-2 while the Judges improve to 4-1. For the Commodores, junior guard Austin Williams led all scorers with 17 points and junior Brandon King was second on the team with 13 points. Daqauise Andrews chipped in with 12 points, while senior Uzonna Akazi score nine points and led the team with five rebounds. Junior Cantrell Barker rounded out the Commodores’ scoring with eight points. For the Judges, senior Edwin Sainvil led the team with 16 points and eight assists. Junior Jermaine Lawrence was second on the team with 15 points while leading the team with 15 rebounds. Senior Tajay Henry scored 13 points and grabbed 12 rebounds. Junior Omar Williams scored 10 points and dished out four assists. Junior Daniel Janel added eight points of his own. The Judges out rebounded the Commodores 40-11. Next up for the Commodores will be the Martin Van Buren Vee Bees (2-3).

The Vee Bees loss to the Beach Chanel Dolphins (4-2) by a score of 58-57. For the Vee Bees, senior Brandon Howard led the team in scoring with 24 points while grabbing eight rebounds. Senior Bruce Howard was second on the team with 10 points. Senior Chucks Obunse scored eight points and led the team in rebounds with 14. Senior Patrick Gustave scored six points and grabbed seven rebounds. For the Dolphins, senior Ismail Abdullah led the team with 24 points and seven rebounds. Senior Semaj Smith was second on the team with 15 points while pulling down four rebounds. Senior Jyshawn Allen added seven points. Next up for the Dolphins will be the Flushing Red Devils (0-6).

The Red Devils lost to the Thomas Edison Inventors (1-5) by a score of 64-61. For the Inventors, senior Deshawn Cann led all scorers with 33 points, more than double his season average of 14.83. Jaleel Charles had a double-double with 17 points and 12 rebounds and sophomore Orain Lawrence added eight points of his own. For the Red Devils, senior Dillon Bowen led the team with 14 points. Senior Richard Johnson was second on the team with 11 points and sophomore Papa Ekow Donkor had a double-double with 10 points and 10 rebounds. Next up for the Inventors will be the Campus Magnet Bull Dogs (5-1).

The Bull Dogs, who lead the Queens AA Division, won their last game over the Forest Hills Rangers (3-3) by a score of 68-59, marking the Bull-Dogs’ fifth win in a row. Senior Samuel Durodola led the team with 18 points and eight rebounds and senior Grequan Carter had 15 points and six assists. Senior Tarik Raynor scored 13 points and grabbed five rebounds, while sophomore Noah Vickers scored 12 points and dished out five assists. For the Rangers, senior Arif Mehmetaj led the team with 19 points completing the double-double with 10 rebounds. Senior Shamoy Allen was second on the team with 18. Junior Benjamin Batash was third in scoring with 10 points and senior Damien Jackson fell two points shy of a double-double with eight points and 10 rebounds.

High School Football Roundup


| hzwillenberg@queenscourier.com

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The Bayside Commodores improved to 6-0 with a 28-6 win over the James Madison Knights (4-2). The Commodores had a total of 243 yards with junior Julian Moody completing two out of four passing attempts for 62 yards and a touchdown. Junior George Wallace led the Commodores with 75 yards on the ground and a touchdown. Senior Timothy Capers rushed for 40 yards on 10 attempts and a touchdown, while senior Richard Vaughan added 32 yards on the ground on six attempts and scored a touchdown as well. Junior Daquan Williams rushed for 34 yards of his own. For the Knights, senior Berkay Dagbolen completed five of eight passes for 52 yards and two interceptions. Senior Adeyinka Anifowoshe led the Knights in rushing with 44 yards, while junior Corey Woods rushed for 14 yards on four attempts and scored the Knight’s lone touchdown. Next up for the Commodores will be the Jamaica Beavers (3-3).
The Beach Channel Dolphins fell to the August Martin Falcons (4-2) by a score of 24-14, their second loss in a row. The Dolphins won the battle in the passing game, with 162 of their 316 yards coming through the air – while the Falcons gained all but 18 of their 333 yards on the ground. For the Falcons, senior Ricky Dunbar, who had only 107 rushing yards all season coming into the game, had 180 yards rushing with two touchdowns on eight attempts. Senior Roger Cox added 105 yards of his own while scoring two touchdowns. On the defensive side of the ball, sophomore Layquane Ezeigwe was a star for the Falcons totaling eight tackles and three sacks. For the Dolphins, Breland Archbold completed 13 of 24 passing attempts for 162 yards, a touchdown and three interceptions. Sophomore Chris Reed led the Dolphins in rushing with 87 yards on 13 attempts and a touchdown. Next up for the Dolphins will be the Long Island City Bulldogs (2-4).
In their last game, the Bulldogs beat the Mott Haven Educational Campus Mavericks (2-4) by a score of 32-26. The Bulldogs has a total of 357 yards while the Mavericks gained 423 yards. For the Bulldogs, senior Ioannis Karakalpakidis completed three of five passing attempts for 77 yards and a touchdown. Senior Aimen Muflihi rushed for 130 yards on six attempts and a touchdown. Senior Cheyenne Dones rushed for 125 yards while scoring three touchdowns on 24 attempts. For the Mavericks, senior Abely Soto competed six out of 10 passes for 118 yards and two touchdowns. Soto also rushed for 100 yards on 11 attempts. Senior Joseph Garcia rushed for 95 yards on six attempts and a touchdown. Senior Jesus Anziani rushed for 60 yards and a touchdown on five attempts.
In the Championship Division, the John Adams Spartans (4-2) beat the Herbert H. Lehman Lions (2-4) by a score of 44-26. The Spartans had a total of 460 offensive yards while allowing 297 yards from the opposition. Senior Danny Perez completed three of six passes for 42 yards. On the ground senior Antoine Arnold led all rushers in the game with 206 yards and two touchdowns on 18 attempts. Senior Devven Baker rushed for 87 yards with two touchdowns on 13 attempts. Senior Shane Hubbard rushed for 83 yards and scored two touchdowns as well on six attempts. For the Lions, junior Corey Bright completed six out of 12 passes for 71 yards with two touchdowns and two interceptions. Senior Davis White rushed for 203 yards on 32 attempts with a touchdown. Next up for the Spartans will be the New Dorp Centrals (0-6).

Around the Gridiron: Football Roundup


| smosco@queenscourier.com

Photo by Kathy Troina

In the Public School Athletic League, the Bayside Commodores (3-0) stayed undefeated with a victory over the Christopher Columbus High School Blue Steel (0-3) by a score of 26-6. The Commodores dominated on the offensive side of the ball with 436 total yards. Junior quarterback Julian Moody threw for 59 yards on six of nine attempts with an interception. On the ground, the Commodores rushed for 377 yards, with senior Richard Vaughan leading all with 188 yards on 14 attempts with a touchdown. Senior Timothy Capers had 110 yards of his own with two touchdowns. On the defensive side of the ball, Wendell O’Brien was the star, intercepting two passes including one pick-6. For the Blue Steel, senior Chevaugh Wilson scored the lone touchdown and rushed for 42 yards on three attempts. Next up for the Commodores will be the Springfield Garden Golden Eagles (0-3).

In their last game, the Golden Eagles lost to the Tilden Educational Campus Blue Devils by a score of 14-6. The Golden Eagles had a total of 110 yards, with all but 25 yards coming on the ground. Sophomore Jair Brown led the team with 33 yards rushing, while senior Isaiah Baptiste had 29 yards rushing on 11 attempts with a touchdown. For the Blue Devils, junior quarterback Shawn Brathwaite completed just three of nine passes, but he threw for 54 yards with two touchdowns.

 

The Beach Channel Dolphins beat the Lafayette Educational Complex Patriots by a score of 32-0. The Dolphins had a total of 224 offensive yards, while junior quarterback Breland Archbold struggled, completing just four out of 15 passes with one touchdown. On the ground, sophomore Diequan Underwood had 89 yards on eight attempts and a touchdown. Senior Javis Black rushed for 21 yards on four attempts and a touchdown. Underwood led the Dolphins on the defensive side as well, intercepting two passes and returning one for a touchdown. Next up for the Dolphins will be the James Madison Knights (3-0).

The John Adams Spartans (1-2) lost to the Tottenville Pirates (3-0) by a score of 49-6. The Spartans could not get going on either side of the ball. On offense, the team managed a total of 131 yards. Senior quarterback Danny Perez completed four out of 15 passing attempts for 45 yards and an interception. On the ground, senior Shane Hubbard rushed for 43 yards on three attempts. Hubbard also returned five kicks for 145 yards and a touchdown. For the Pirates, junior Augustus Edwards led the team with 100 yards on five attempts and three touchdowns. Next up for the Spartans will be the Franklin D. Roosevelt Cougars (0-3).

In the Catholic High School Football League of Metropolitan New York, the St. Francis Prep Terriers won their first game of the season, 39-15, over St. Peter’s of Staten Island. Senior quarterback Thomas Cani connected on eight of 17 passes for 88 yards and one rushing touchdown. Cani was a little wild however, tossing two interceptions. On the ground, junior Kadir Wisdom rushed for 81 yards on 10 carries – including a 60 yard run – with two touchdowns. Fellow senior running back Casey Beaudoin ran for 37 yards on nine carries with one touchdown. Prep’s defensive squad ran roughshod over their opponents, with senior Maurice Parker leading the team with 10 tackles, junior Ramel Joseph nabbing one interception for 61 yards and senior Jonathan Henderson grabbing two interceptions and one fumble recovery. Prep now heads to Aviator Sports Complex in Brooklyn to take on Xavier High School.