Tag Archives: Glendale

More retail coming to Shops at Atlas Park


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Liam La Guerre

More retail is coming to a Glendale shopping center about a year after the mall underwent a makeover.

The Shops at Atlas Park announced Thursday it will be opening a Footlocker, Payless ShoeSource, Auntie Anne’s, beauty retailer ULTA Beauty and Crazy 8, a children’s clothing and accessories store.

The shopping center, located at 8000 Cooper Ave., and owned by Macerich, is also in the process of planning its Summer on the Green event series, which features family-friendly programs, such as movies and concerts.

Last summer, Atlas Park opened the Center Green, a 10,000-square-foot area especially designed for events, as part of an overall redesign for the mall.

After shoppers said the center’s selection of stores was subpar, Macerich, with the hopes of a new and improved retail experience, also brought in new retail last year, including, Charlotte Russe and Forever 21.

 

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Glendale’s Finback Brewery set to open in May


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy Finback Brewery.

Follow me @liamlaguerre

 

The Finback Brewery will finally surface on May 10, the Glendale establishment announced via Twitter Wednesday.

Craft beer makers Kevin Stafford and Basil Lee were planning to open the Queens brewery last November, but construction delayed its debut.

Lee, a Harvard-educated architect, and Stafford, an art designer, were frequent home brewers, but finally decided to take the leap a few years ago to open a full brick-and-beer location.

The name Finback Brewery is a tribute to the Finback whale that washed up on the shores of Breezy Point in 2012.

In the past few months the brewery has been selling its beer in bars around Queens and in the city.

 

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Frustrated community board members wait for more details on Glendale homeless shelter


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Photo by Jeff Stone

JEFF STONE

Queens leaders said they are frustrated that there has been no date set for a community meeting on a controversial Glendale homeless shelter proposal.

Community board members, along with the New York City Department of Homeless Services (DHS), said Monday they have yet to hear from Samaritan Village about when the homeless advocacy group will be ready with a presentation on the proposal to convert the abandoned manufacturing plant at 78-16 Cooper Ave. into a home for 125 families.

Politicians and Glendale residents alike have previously expressed reservations over the sudden population influx, the building’s distance from the subway and possible contamination at the site in question.

Since the DHS announced that it would support the Samaritan Village effort, though, elected officials in Queens have worried about whether the two political groups are on the same page.

“It’s a very difficult process that seems to be all too standard,” said Gary Giordano, District Manager of Community Board 5, which includes Glendale. “It’s my impression that the Department of Homeless Services is talking to the applicant long before they’re talking to either the community board or the council person in the community.”

The frustration stretches back to December of last year, when the DHS sent a letter to the mayor’s office recommending the former airplane manufacturing plant be converted into a living space for displaced New Yorkers. Along with unanimously disagreeing with the letter, board members complained about being given too little notice that meetings had been scheduled and implied that the DHS might be trying to rush through the process.

Asked if the Department of Homeless Services needed a community board’s permission to build a new shelter, Giordano said, “Their policy is that they tell the applicant that they have to reach out to the local community board and let them know what they are intending and to give the community board an opportunity to conduct a public meeting on the matter.”

DHS spokesman Christopher Miller said the agency has been trying to find a time that works for all three parties.

“We are waiting for the provider to come up with a presentation date,” he said.

Samaritan Village did not return repeated requests for comment.

How soon the tension will simmer is anyone’s guess. Mr. Giordano refused to speculate on whether anything in the to-be-scheduled presentation was likely change his mind or the minds of any other board members, although he did say a meeting could soon be slated for a weeknight in May.

“I expect them to tell us as much as possible, or as much as we can get out of them, about the specifics of what’s in their application, some of which we know and some of which we don’t know,” he said. “I haven’t heard anybody say this is a reasonable site and that this is a reasonable way to be living.”

 

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Glendale’s St. Pancras Church choir to host anniversary concert


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Liam La Guerre

Follow me @liamlaguerre

 

St. Pancras Church in Glendale is planning a free concert in May to celebrate three landmark anniversaries.

The concert will honor the 10th year of the church organ, 20 years that Steven Frank has been the choir director and organist, and the 40th year that the church has been in the Archdiocese of Brooklyn.

The 18 members of the choir will be joined by former St. Pancras choristers and special guests to sing a variety of songs.

Frank, who is also dean of the Queens chapter of American Guild of Organists, said the group has been putting the concert together since last year, and it will be something that you don’t want to miss.

Free St. Pancras Choristers’ concert:
May 18, 5:30 p.m.
St. Pancras Church
72-22 68th St., Glendale

 

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Addabbo sends list of bus problems to MTA


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Liam La Guerre

Follow me @liamlaguerre

 

A local legislator is hoping to put the brakes on bus problems in the region he represents.

State Senator Joseph Addabbo recently sent a list of complaints from constituents to the MTA about bus service on nearly 10 lines, including some that travel through the subway scarce neighborhoods of Glendale, Maspeth and Middle Village, hoping the agency can resolve the issues.

The note includes problems such as buses frequently arriving 20 or more minutes behind schedule, multiple buses bunching together and buses passing by commuters with “not in service” signs. The lines include the Q18, Q11/Q21, Q54, Q55, Q67, Q38 and Q29.

“As we negotiate our state budget funding and administrative decisions, we must realize that these resources must be allocated rationally and efficiently,” Addabbo said. “Acknowledging that the MTA provides a critical service and that state resources are not infinite, we must impress upon the MTA to improve service for my constituents given the resources it has.”

Last month, The Courier revealed exclusively that the MTA plans to reduce overall service in April of the Q54, which riders in Middle Village and Glendale depend on to connect to subway lines in Jamaica and Williamsburg, Brooklyn.

During weekday “PM peak” hours—from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m.—the Q54 will run every six minutes and 30 seconds, instead of every five minutes, according to the MTA’s January Transit & Bus Committee Meeting. During the evening schedule, which follows “PM peak” hours, the Q54 will run every 20 minutes instead of every 15.

 

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St. Pancras celebrates Irish tradition with St. Patrick’s Day Dinner and Dance


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Liam La Guerre

Follow me @liamlaguerre

 

St. Pancras School in Glendale hosted its annual St. Patrick’s Day Dinner and Dance on Saturday, March 9, to celebrate Irish tradition and school pride.

More than 150 alums and residents of various cultures attended the event.

There were raffles at the dinner, with all proceeds going to purchase a new SMART Board for the school.

Although St. Patrick’s Day isn’t until March 17, attendees donned green robes, shirts, ties and hats. There was traditional Celtic food, including corned beef and cabbage, and women performed Irish step dancing.

People also danced to live music by the Boston Burglars, an Irish American band that plays rock and roll.

“We wanted the St. Pancras school alumni to come back and celebrate with us every year on this very important occasion,” said Glendale Civilian Observation Patrol president Frank Kotnik, who is a St. Pancras alum and was the emcee at the event. “You didn’t have to be Irish to come here. It makes no difference. This is a school, parish, alumni thing.”

 

 

 

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Star of Queens: Mary Parisen, co-founder, Civics United for Railroad Environmental Solutions (CURES)


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Mary 3

COMMUNITY SERVICE: Mary Parisen is the co-founder of Civics United for Railroad Environmental Solutions (CURES), a coalition of some of the largest civic associations in western Queens, that came together to improve railroad infrastructure, public health and safety.

BACKGROUND:  Parisen, who works full-time as a school librarian, lives in Glendale, near the Fresh Pond Road freight. She was bothered by the noise, smell and pollution of the trains in the area. So in 2004 she spoke at a community board meeting about the concerns many people in the neighborhood had with the trains, and what came out of that was a green streets project.

“This was to try to abate the noise and make everything look nicer, but it still didn’t change the noise or the air pollution,” she said.

When Mary Arnold, Parisen’s neighbor and co founder of CURES, moved in, they both worked together to solve this problem.  The women formed a group that focused on small but successful beautification projects, and at a meeting when the issue resurfaced, Parisen said, someone suggested a group of civics be formed to tackle the problem, and that is how CURES was born.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS: Together with the other civic groups, CURES has been able to get the rail lines to use better technology and equipment.

GOALS: CURES’ mission is to work with federal, state and local agencies, elected officials and the railroads, to ensure that they are proactively keeping the neighborhoods clean by having the trains use better and quieter technology.

The increase in rail traffic caused an environmental burden in our neighborhood,” said Parisen.

Parisen and the group would like to see the repowering and upgrading of all locomotives in the Fresh Pond Rail terminal.  

“I’m going to have a granddaughter soon, and I don’t want to have to feel nervous to take her out of my house because of the air pollution in my area,” said Parisen.

BIGGEST CHALLENGE: According to Parisen, the New York Metropolitan Transportation Council has said that rail is going to increase by 50 percent by 2040.

“This increase in rail traffic should not come at the expense of the people who live in the community,” said Parisen. She added her organization is not opposed to the use of rail, but she believes that this increase should be thought with mitigation with the community.

 

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State comptroller finds irregularities with Samaritan Village


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Liam La Guerre

Residents in Glendale now have more ammunition to strike back against the proposed homeless shelter.

New York State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli found financial irregularities in an audit by the state Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services (OASAS), in which non-profit Samaritan Village is charging the state nearly $1 million for “unallowable, inappropriate, questionable or undocumented expenses.”

The mishandling of funds is significant because Samaritan Village is in negotiations with the city Department of Homeless Services to operate a 125-family transitional housing facility in Glendale with a five year, $27 million contract. However, the community has rallied against the proposal since it was submitted last year.

Samaritan Village provides residential, outpatient and treatment services in the city under a five-year, $73.3 million contract for OASAS. The agency reimburses Samaritan Village for the net costs it incurs to provide the services.

In response to the findings, Assemblymember Andrew Hevesi penned a letter to Mayor Bill de Blasio and Department of Homeless Services Commissioner Gilbert Taylor, asking to suspend contract negotiations for the non-profit with the city regarding the Glendale homeless shelter.

“These findings from the state’s top financial office deserve consideration from your administration when determining whether the city of New York should enter into a new extended contract with an organization that is currently being cited for potential operational deficiencies,” Hevesi’s letter said. “It is appropriate for the city of New York to suspend further consideration of new contracts with this entity until further investigation.”

 

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Two Queens men charged in rash of burglaries


| mhayes@queenscourier.com

Two Queens men have been arrested for a series of burglaries across the borough over the last six months.

Randolph Ardila of Maspeth and Raheim West of Long Island City are both charged with separate, various accounts of burglary, attempted burglary and criminal possession of stolen property, according to District Attorney Richard A. Brown.

Ardila, 29, allegedly acted as the lookout for several Glendale and Ozone Park attempted apartment burglaries on Feb. 21. Later, at the time of his arrest, he was allegedly carrying a blue plastic contained filled with change, which had been reported missing from the Ozone Park apartment, Brown said.

In his car, police allegedly found a box containing the cremated ashes of a tenant’s mother, reported missing from a second Ozone Park location, according to the district attorney.

West, 37, was allegedly busted on tape breaking into the Promise Christian Academy Church in Flushing and making off with over $2,000 in cash last September and is additionally accused of stealing $160 from an employee at Flushing’s Asian Community Care Management earlier this month.

The LIC resident is also a suspect in two residential burglaries in Corona and another in College Point throughout February. Pry marks on the College Point residence allegedly match those made by West’s pry bar, Brown said.

When West was arrested, police recovered the pry bar, a screw driver and work gloves from his vehicle.

Ardila faces up to 30 years in prison if convicted and was ordered held on $150,000 bail. West, who faces 28 years, is being held on $200,000 bail. The pair will return to court March 10.

 

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Board approves proposed bike lanes in Ridgewood and Glendale


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Map courtesy of City Planning

Follow me @liamlaguerre 

 

Plans to add new bike lanes to Community Board 5 (CB 5) got the green light.

After an endorsement by freshman Councilmember Antonio Reynoso, CB 5 approved the proposed bike lanes in Ridgewood and Glendale on Wednesday with a 29-5 vote.

The Department of City Planning will begin implementing the phase one bike lanes of the proposal this summer, which connect to the Brooklyn network of paths.

One set flows parallel on Woodward and Onderdonk avenues from Flushing Avenue to Cooper Avenue. Another set runs on Harman and Himrod streets from Evergreen Avenue to Metropolitan Avenue.

“I’m very excited for this first step. I wish it could have been more,” said John Maier, co-chair of the CB 5 Transportation Committee. “I look forward to working with City Planning and the board to find phase two and possibly phase three.”

The city agency will also continue to evaluate the phase two bike lanes of the proposal, which could eventually add more paths and connect routes in Maspeth and Middle Village.

Phase two contains an expansive network of lanes throughout the rest of CB 5. However, residents have complained about a proposed lane on Elliot Street through Mount Olivet Cemetery between 67th Street and Mount Olivet Crescent. The two-way street is so narrow it is already dangerous for car traffic.

 

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City Comptroller Scott Stringer sits down with The Queens Courier


| mhayes@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Melissa Chan

City Comptroller Scott Stringer sat down with The Queens Courier to discuss his first weeks in office and just where he plans to go from here.

“We hit the ground running,” he said. “It’s getting out and listening to what people say. If you want to do audits and identify people and agencies, you talk to people in the streets and get a very good idea.”

Stringer oversees the city’s $150 billion pension fund and also registers an average of 22,000 city contracts from every business concerning technology, to day care, to public housing.

For the start of his term, he has already audited public housing as well as the three separate public library systems.

He is a supporter of raising the minimum wage to $11 to accommodate the city’s price of living, and also an advocate for establishing a guaranteed revenue stream for universal pre-kindergarten. He believes in advancing public schools, namely in technology, to give students a fighting chance at a successful future.

Stringer has also made some changes internally intended to improve the efficacy of the comptroller’s office. He has proposed to ban placement agents, the “middle men” who have been involved in various past scandals, and brought in risk management professionals.

“I can’t audit an agency unless my own house is in order,” he said.

With The Courier,  Stringer covered borough-centric topics and expanded on how he plans to keep Queens, and the whole city, afloat financially.

“Nobody knows this city better than me,” he said.

 

What is your political background?

“Well, I haven’t told anyone this, but the first thing I wanted to be was a pro quarterback with the New York Jets. Then I realized early on by the age of 12, I was a little washed up,” Stringer said.

Stringer’s family had a foot in the political door when his mother ran for City Council. Growing up in Washington Heights, he thought “everyone was involved in government or politics.”

“I’m doing exactly what I always wanted to do,” he said. “The job of comptroller has never been more important [than] with this new government. I have the opportunity to work on issues I really care about.”

Stinger said the city’s economic issues are “really about civil rights and about moving everybody to where they have to be.”

“The challenge we face in the city [is] how do we bring everybody along economically,” he said.

The MTA has suspended No. 7-train service from Long Island City to Flushing for 22 weekends. What economic impact for local businesses do you foresee?

“When you have a large transportation project that in the long run will modernize the system, that’s something that’s goal-worthy,” Stringer said. “But when you don’t plan the reconstruction with the community, when you don’t partner with the businesses, you end up sacrificing people.”

“You’re sacrificing people in the name of progress, you can’t do it that way,” he said.

As comptroller, Stringer said he can “follow the money,” and make sure it is “being spent wisely.”

Additionally, he wants to “elevate this office so New Yorkers know when they want to bring an issue to my attention, they know what this office can do and what we’re going to do.”

The city Build it Back program for Sandy victims has tested the patience of many residents still trying to rebuild. How do you plan on monitoring those funds, as well as the $15 billion the city is set to receive in federal recovery funding?

During Stringer’s campaign, he proposed creating a Sandy Audit Bureau, designed specifically to watch every dollar designated for storm recovery. He has followed through and said he and the bureau will look at contractors and will be “laser focused” in making sure the money goes where it should.

“Where we find corruption or misuse of money, I want to make it very clear to everyone we will make referrals to law enforcement agencies based on our findings,” Stringer said. “The worst that can happen is you get hit by two hurricanes, because somebody took money or didn’t do the work they said they were going to.”

The comptroller is also working with Councilmember Donovan Richards and others involved with the Sandy Tracker, an online database monitoring recovery money coming in and out of the city.

He also said the administration should extend the deadline for Build it Back so more people can gain access to the recovery assistance program.

 

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Benjamin Cardozo senior wins National Youth Award from Hispanic Heritage Foundation


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Hispanic Heritage Foundation photo by Omar Ogues

One Benjamin Cardozo High School senior has received national recognition for her hard work.

Elsa Alvarado, a resident of Glendale, received the National Youth Award in the education category from the Hispanic Heritage Foundation (HHF) on Thursday for her extracurricular activities and high academic performance.

She was just one of six students—after thousands applied—to earn the honor, which identifies young leaders in the Latino community.

Alvarado, who is of Nicaraguan descent, received a $1,000 grant and a Google Chromebook laptop, along with round-trip accommodations to Miami for the award ceremony.

“This is more than just an award because it speaks to being Hispanic,” Alvarado said. “It unites all the students, because we share the same goals and the same backgrounds.”

Alvarado averages a 3.9 GPA at Cardozo. She is passionate about languages, and is currently fluent in three—English, Spanish and French. She is also learning German.

Alvarado started The Future Educators of New York club at Cardozo last year, which focuses on tutoring children from kindergarten to middle school. There are currently 60 members in the club that teach various subjects.

She aspires to work in developing countries as a language professor and teach children how to communicate and learn the importance of language. She also wants to work as an ambassador in the future.

Alvarado plans to attend Georgetown University, the University of Notre Dame or George Washington University next year, and major in international relations.

“Elsa stood out as a bright, young woman who we believe will make a deep and positive impact on the education system, said Emanuel Pleitez, chair of the HHF’s Board of Directors. “We at the Hispanic Heritage Foundation are constantly searching for passionate students like her to recognize and assist in achieving their goals.”

 

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Ridgewood, Glendale could get new bike paths this summer


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Map courtesy Department of City Planning

The ongoing plans to add new bike lanes to Community Board 5 (CB 5) seem to be rolling along smoothly.

CB 5’s Transportation Committee voted unanimously on Tuesday to recommend proposed lanes in Ridgewood and Glendale, which could be implemented as early as this summer.

The proposal, which includes lanes in the Department of City Planning’s phase one plan, will now hinge on a full board vote in the CB 5 February meeting.

If the board approves the new bike paths, City Planning will begin implementing the lanes this summer. The agency will also continue to evaluate phase two, which would eventually add more bike paths and connect routes in Maspeth and Middle Village.

Phase one of the plans connect to the bike lanes in the Brooklyn network of paths.

One set flows parallel on Woodward and Onderdonk avenues from Flushing Avenue to Cooper Avenue. Another set runs on Harman and Himrod streets from Evergreen Avenue to Metropolitan Avenue.

Phase two contains an expansive network of lanes throughout the rest of CB 5. However, residents have complained about a proposed lane on Elliot Street through Mount Olivet Cemetery between 67th Street and Mount Olivet Crescent. The two-way street is so narrow it is already dangerous for car traffic.

 

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Glendale’s Finback Brewery to launch beer at local bars despite setbacks


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Finback Brewery

Glendale’s Finback Brewery won’t open for a few more months, but the beer is finally coming to the surface.

The brewery, which was originally supposed to open in November last year, has been delayed by construction issues, but founders Basil Lee and Kevin Stafford are introducing three Finback beers at three bars around the city.

The brewery will have launch events for the beer at The Owl Farm bar in Brooklyn on Wednesday, Jimmy’s No. 43 in Manhattan on Thursday, and Forest Hills Station House in Queens on Jan. 28.

The three beers are Pilot X IPA, a citrusy drink filled with Summit, Chinook and Columbus hops, and hints of pink grapefruit; Puffin Smoked Porter, American porter filled with roast subtle hazelnut aroma and a smoky backbone from cherry wood smoked malt, and hints of chocolate; and Double Sess Wit, brewed with Szechuan peppercorns, ginger and chamomile.

The pair hopes to introduce the beer at other bars in the city, including The Queens Kickshaw in Astoria, and are shooting to open the brewery’s tasting room in late February or March, according to the owners.

“We’re working hard to finish the tasting room and open the brewery for beer and tours,” the owners said in an email. “We wish we could welcome you all to the brewery right now, but alas, NYC contractors have their own way of working, or not working…Rest assured we’re busy making beer and getting it out to our favorite local watering holes. Hopefully we’ll get the tasting room open in the next couple months.”

 

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Man fatally stabbed in Glendale


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Updated 5:20 p.m.

A man is dead after he was stabbed multiple times in Glendale Saturday, police said.

Officers, responding to a 9-1-1 call, found 26-year-old Emilliano LLames, of Brooklyn, on Cypress Hills Street, near 80th Avenue, about 2:10 a.m., with numerous stab wounds to the chest, the NYPD said.

He was taken to Jamaica Hospital where he was pronounced dead, according to police.

There are no arrests at this time and the investigation is ongoing.

 

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