Tag Archives: Glendale

ULTA Beauty opens up in Glendale shopping center


| slicata@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Salvatore Licata

It was a beauty-full day on Friday at The Shops at Atlas Park as it welcomed ULTA Beauty to its complex.

This is ULTA Beauty’s second store to come to Queens with the first location opening up in Rego Park three years ago. The 10,000-square foot location at the Glendale shopping center has more than 20,000 products for both men and women. It features 20,000 beauty products, 4,000 testers and more than 1,000 scents while also offering in-store services for skin care, hair and eyebrows.

More than 200 people lined up for its Aug. 15 grand opening with the first 100 receiving gift certificates ranging from $5 to $100 for future purchases.  The store will also be offering free makeovers and consultations all weekend.

“ULTA is all things beauty, all in one place,” said Kelly Smith, who manages all grand openings for ULTA Beauty.  “We are truly a beauty destination for Glendale, and our ULTA beauty experts are ready to help with all of your beauty needs, from the basics to the perfect shade of lipstick to the newest hair tool.”

 

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Residents nervous about Glendale homeless shelter impact on schools


| slicata@queenscourier.com

THE QUEENS COURIER/ Photo by Salvatore Licata


Hundreds of residents voiced concerns of potentially overcrowded schools at a forum on the impact of a proposed homeless shelter in Glendale.

It would be irresponsible to put kids in a shelter that you cannot fit into its zoned school district, said Nick Comaianni, president of the Community Education Council for District 24 at the Wednesday meeting at P.S./I.S. 28.

“District 24 is already the most overcrowded school district in the city,” Comaianni said. “This is not a strategic place to house these children.”

Thirty-one of the 39 schools in the district are already over capacity, ranging from about 110 to 150 percent saturation, according to Councilwoman Elizabeth Crowley.

Adding the 125 families that are proposed for the Cooper Avenue shelter would mean the children living there would have priority to go to school in the area.

Increasing the number of seats to accommodate these families would be too much of a burden on the schools in the area, Crowley said.

“We need to find nearly 5,000 high school and elementary school seats for children already going to school in the area,” she said. “We have to do everything we can do to make sure [the proposed shelter] turns into a school to house these 5,000 children already overcrowding the district.”

The site was looked at two years ago by the School Construction Authority (SCA) but was deemed inadequate because of its proximity to busy Cooper Avenue and because there was a chemical plant  next door, among other things, according to Mary Lease, a representative from the SCA.

However, because Independent Chemical Corporation would now like to sell, adding that land to the land of both the vacant factory and the Hansel ‘n Gretel meat processing plant, which is for sale, means the SCA is re-considering the nine acre plot for a school, Lease said.

To buy the land, the SCA first has to do environmental assessment tests on all three of the sites.  At this point, only Hansel ‘n Gretel has agreed to let the SCA on their property to do an environmental review, with the owner of the vacant factory and owner of the Independent Chemical Company denying access, according to Lease. Without all three sites, the SCA will not build a school there, according to Lease.

Samaritan Village, the nonprofit organization looking to build the homeless shelter on the site, wants to lease the vacant factory for 60 years.

The proposed lease has not made its way to City Comptroller Scott Stringer’s office yet, according to Crowley.

“We have to keep pressing upon the mayor’s office and continue our fight,” state Sen. Joe Addabbo said. “We have a serious issue regarding the overcrowding of our schools and this is not an issue that will go away.”

There is one possibility that may alleviate the further overcrowding of schools in the area if the homeless shelter is built. The school of origin program is one where children who move from one district to another can stay in the school they attended previously. This is a condition that parents of the homeless children may consider which can help some of congestion.

But considering that District 24 schools are already at 30 percent higher capacity than any other district in the city, adding even a couple of children to the schools would be too much, Crowley said.

Residents of the district asked both Crowley and Addabbo what the plans are going forward.

Crowley said she would make sure the chancellor of New York City Schools, Carmen Fariña, is aware of the issues that are already facing the district even without children from the shelter. Addabbo said he will continue to fight and send letters to the mayor’s office about the negative impact this shelter will have on the community.

But both agreed that residents also need to voice their concerns to the comptroller’s and mayor’s offices to show there is great concern for their children’s education.

 

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Local politicians urge city to delay Ridgewood Reservoir plans


| ejankiewicz@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Liam La Guerre

A plan to alter the Ridgewood Reservoir is being challenged by several local politicians, who say proposed “changes will significantly harm the natural and largely undisturbed habitats of the animals that currently live there.”

The letter, sent to Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Thursday, was written in response to a meeting held in Glendale on June 30. During that meeting the Parks Department outlined a plan to connect the three water basins that make up the reservoir together by “creating three very large breaches in the reservoir’s surrounding berms,” according to the letter. The plan has been controversial and many community members have argued against making any changes to the old reservoir.

The reservoir is made up of three water basins that are isolated from one another sitting on 50 acres of land, according to the Parks Department. The reservoir originally supplied water to Brooklyn until 1959 and has since become a park that is home to an array of wildlife. Some of the wetland plants in the reservoir are on the endangered and threatened lists.

The Parks Department proposed the changes because it claims that the resevoir is currently a flood hazard.

“We ask that the NYC Parks Department be granted a waiver so they can delay the proposed work,” the politicians wrote in the letter in response to the plans. The politicians argue that along with disturbing animal habitats and cutting down 470 trees, the construction is a waste of money.

“The proposed project to breach the dam of the Ridgewood Reservoir will cost the city at least $6 million. We believe that there are many other areas where the city can spend this money including building more schools, improving our infrastructure, upgrading our transportation system, and many other capital requests that our Community Boards have highlighted.”

The letter was signed by state Sens. Joseph Addabbo and Michael Gianaris, Assemblyman Michael Miller, Assemblywoman Catherine Nolan, Councilwoman Elizabeth Crowley, Councilman Antonio Reynoso and U.S Reps. Nydia Velazquez and Grace Meng.



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Glendale deli manufacturer closes down after more than 140 years in business


| ejankiewicz@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Eric Jankiewicz

A deli manufacturing business in Glendale announced that it’s closing for good after more than a century of providing deli meats.

Hansel N’ Gretel, which has been processing food on Cooper Avenue since 1970, ceased operations in June and is putting the site up for sale, according to a statement from the company.

“It was the last deli meat manufacturer in NY. When Mr. Rattner died in 2012 we knew it was only a matter of time before it closed,” Doreen Fleming wrote on Facebook when she heard that it was closing. “At least it didn’t go bankrupt. Sad because a great bunch of good people worked there.”

The owners of Hansel N’ Gretel, the Rattner family, offered no reason for closing and declined to discuss the matter.

A spokeswoman for the  family said that they would begin to auction off the manufacturing equipment in September.

The building sits on more then two acres of land and the area is an industrial zone, according to city records. Real estate agency Avison Young is brokering the sale of the site and they advertise it as  a “multi-purpose” plot.

Hansel N’ Gretel opened in 1872.  The company originally operated in Manhattan’s Meatpacking District and moved to Glendale in 1970 to accommodate the increase in work, according to a press release.


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Paperwork filed to convert Glendale abandoned warehouse to homeless shelter


| ejankiewicz@queenscourier.com

Photo by Jeff Stone

Developers have filed paperwork with the Department of Buildings to convert an abandoned Glendale warehouse into a homeless shelter, according to city records.

The site, at 78-16 Cooper Ave., is where the city proposed a homeless shelter through Samaritan Village. The estimated cost, according to the records, is $3,727,100. The building permits are pending until City Comptroller Scott Stringer signs off on the proposed homeless shelter, a bureaucratic process that can take months or years according to Stringer’s spokesman.

The owner, according to the filed paperwork with the Department of Buildings, is Daniel Rabinowitz and the request for construction was filed on July 11.

“I don’t have a response,” Rabinowitz told The Courier. “I try to do the right thing. I don’t mean any harm.”

Several residents recently became aware of the filing and many in the group suggested swamping the applicants with calls and emails, a strategy they used on Stringer’s office and other politicians.

“So since the project has not gone to the comptroller’s office yet—why is the building owner filing permits for construction—are they all so confident that this will pass the comptrollers office or is the corruption deep enough that it will?”  Kathy Masi, president of the Glendale Civic Association, asked on Facebook.

 

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Twirling Glendale girl goes for gold


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photos by Eric Jankiewicz

SALVATORE LICATA

Trina Catterson will try to “twirl” her way to gold at the World Baton Twirling Championships in England next month.

Catterson, a Glendale resident, earned her way to the United States national team to represent the country in the international event, which is equivalent to the Olympic Games for twirlers, by finishing in second place at the national tournament in early July. At only 13 years old she is nervous yet excited to have such an honor bestowed upon her.

“I’m very grateful to represent the junior women and my country in this event,” Catterson said. “It’s great to see all the practice and dedication put in by me and my family pay off.”

Catterson started twirling at age 4 and won gold at her first national competition at age 7. She tested her skills at her first international competition two years ago in France and came home with a bronze medal in the junior pair’s competition. Since Catterson first picked up a twirling baton her mother knew she had something special.

“She has a natural gift for this sport,” Kathlene Catterson said. “From the start she could do certain tricks as a 4-year-old that many kids can’t do until they are 7 or 8.”

Twirling is an aerobic sport that incorporates dance and gymnastic moves while swinging a baton in the air or around the body. Trina first learned about the scarcely publicized sport from her mother, who was once a twirler herself.

There are numerous routines that make up the sport and Trina has nearly mastered every one of them. She credits this achievement to daily practices on her own, practice with her Elite coach, Alaine Robbins, about twice a week, and her work ethic.

“Hard work beats talent when talent doesn’t work hard,” she said. “This sport taught me what hard work really is, and I know that no matter what you do you will always be successful as long as you work hard.”

Catterson will be competing for gold in the solo and freestyle portions of the international competition in Nottingham, England from August 4 to the 10. She said this competition will be the peak of her season but has bigger dreams for the future.

“When I’m done with twirling I want to start my own studio to teach young kids how to twirl,” Catterson said. “It taught me so much about life and what could happen when you dedicate yourself to something.”

 

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Glendale beekeepers bring honey to Queens


| ejankiewicz@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Eric Jankiewicz

Glendale is home to two bee aficionados and their honey is making a buzz.

“Bees aren’t adversaries; they’re an asset,” Glendale resident Toby Bloch said. “There were a lot of people interested in bee hives so I thought it would be a cool experience to have them.”

Bloch is an amateur enthusiast and his single hive is located in the Glendale community garden on 88th Street. The garden is run by Gian D’Elia and during a recent tour of the garden he said that the bees add to the garden’s atmosphere.

“They add a level of authenticity we didn’t have before,” he said. “And it helps the honey-making process since we have so many flowers in the garden for them.”

Bloch isn’t the only bee man in town. Tom Wilk lives in Glendale but has 10 beehives across Queens producing honey for local sale.

Wilk, who who spoke briefly to The Courier from vacation in Europe, runs a local business called Wilk Apiary, and the Glendale community garden currently houses one of the Wilk beehives.

Wilk also has hives in Long Island City, Ridgewood, Maspeth, Astoria and Middle Village. In each of those neighborhoods, the honey is sold in local markets. And in 2013, Wilk’s honey from Astoria won the Blue Ribbon at the Queens County Fair, according to the business’s website.

Local honey like Bloch’s and Wilk’s is “very good honey,” Bloch said. “It’s more white than anything else and it has this almost minty flavor to it.”

This fall, Bloch plans to harvest the honey his hive makes. It will be his first harvest since his last colony of bees died in the winter.

“I’m super excited,” he said. “It’s going to be great.”

 

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The Doe Fund to help clean up Myrtle, Grand avenues


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Councilwoman Elizabeth Crowley's Office

CHRIS BUMBACA

In an effort to beautify Queens and support job growth within District 30, Councilwoman Elizabeth Crowley and The Doe Fund announced on Thursday discretionary budget funding of The Doe Fund’s Ready, Willing & Able program.

The Fund’s president and founder, George McDonald as well as other local community leaders, were also on hand for the announcement. The Doe Fund’s workers, men who were formerly incarcerated or homelessness, will take part in this year-long transitional program, and service streets and sidewalks along Myrtle and Grand avenues in communities such as Glendale, Ridgewood and Maspeth, improving cleanliness and safety throughout the community.

Crowley acquired $61,800 in funding in the current budget to fund these street-cleaning crews.

“I’m so thrilled to welcome The Doe Fund to District 30. Myrtle and Grand Avenues have been major sources of sanitation complaints for years, but thanks to The Doe Fund, residents and business owners along these commercial corridors will begin to see a big difference almost immediately,” Crowley, who also serves as Chair of the Committee on Fire and Criminal Justice, said. “This program is win-win: keeping our community clean, while simultaneously providing jobs, education, and career development services for hardworking New Yorkers trying to turn their lives around and make a positive impact.”

The crews will pick up litter and clean trash on Myrtle Avenue from Cooper Avenue to Fresh Pond Road and on Grand Avenue from 61st to 74th streets, three days a week for the next year. Clean-up on Myrtle Avenue began on July 15, and crews began cleaning Grand Avenue on July 15.

“We’re grateful and proud to join Councilmember Crowley in her commitment to her district and the vibrant communities in it,” McDonald said. “By choosing The Doe Fund’s ‘men in blue’ to service Myrtle Avenue and the surrounding area, Ms. Crowley is leading by example, providing our men the opportunity and work they need to transform their lives, while improving the cleanliness and safety of the district’s streets.”

“This is only the beginning, and I look forward to expanding this program over the next several years,” Crowley added.

 

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Stringer criticizes DHS for handling of homeless shelter placement process


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Photos by Salvatore Licata

Amid ongoing controversy over several Queens homeless shelters, the city comptroller has said the Department of Homeless Services (DHS) is “failing” in the way it deals with homelessness throughout the five boroughs.

In a letter to DHS Commissioner Gilbert Taylor, City Comptroller Scott Stringer addressed the ongoing “homelessness crisis, particularly among families” in New York City. He noted that there are different causes that contribute to the rise, however the “current playbook” in dealing with the issue needs to be changed.

“Especially concerning to my office is the emergency contracting approach that the Department of Homeless Services has employed to site new facilities in neighborhoods with minimal community consultation,” Stringer wrote in the letter on Thursday.

In one case, Glendale residents have been fighting for more than two years to stop an abandoned manufacturing plant from becoming a homeless shelter. The community complained that they were given little to no notice about the shelter.

“DHS must begin to immediately repair its relationships with local communities by creating a robust consultative process with community stakeholders for all of its currently planned sites and for those proposed in the future,” Stringer wrote. “This process should allow for meaningful input from local stakeholders, advocacy groups, and elected officials.”

In the past month, two western Queens neighborhoods have also had to deal with unannounced homeless shelters being moved into two hotels.

Hundreds of protestors spoke against the city’s initiative to house homeless families at the Pan American Hotel on Queens Boulevard in Elmhurst without asking for any input from the community.

Last week, the DHS approved the conversion of the Westway Motor Inn on Astoria Boulevard into a shelter housing over 100 families. Residents and elected officials are outraged the agency let them know about the shelter just a day before the families began moving into it.

“If DHS continues to neglect communities until after emergency contracting decisions have been made it will neither benefit from local knowledge of the area nor engender harmonious integration with the surrounding communities,” Stringer wrote.

 

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Councilwoman Crowley proposes alternative to controversial Glendale homeless shelter


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Photo by Jeff Stone

BENJAMIN FANG

The proposed homeless shelter in Glendale is too close to chemicals, too far from public transportation and would pack an already overcrowded school district, Councilwoman Elizabeth Crowley said in a letter to city officials on Thursday.

“I do not believe that the proposed site is a suitable location for a family shelter,” Crowley said in a statement to Department of Homeless Services (DHS) Commissioner Gilbert Taylor. “Community Board 5, countless residents and I urge you to select an alternative location.”

She mentioned less costly alternatives suggested by Mayor Bill de Blasio, such as setting aside affordable housing units for the homeless.

The DHS released an independent environmental analysis of the area on July 1, deeming it suitable for the 125-family shelter. It plans to move forward with the site, which was originally proposed by the nonprofit Samaritan Village.

Christopher Miller, a DHS spokesperson, said they are currently reviewing the councilwoman’s letter. “We feel that the environmental review was extremely thorough as it looked at everything from schools, to transportation, to soil quality,” Miller said in an email.

Crowley said that District 24 is already the most overcrowded school district in the city. The shelter would bring up to 160 school children into the area, according to the DHS-commissioned study.

She also listed specific questions concerning the environmental risks. She asked how impending renovations would impact soil near the facility and potential contamination from a nearby chemical manufacturer.

Crowley asked that answers be provided before entering the next stage of contract negotiations for the shelter.

 

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Ridgewood, Glendale German ancestry revealed in World Cup


| ejankiewicz@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Gottscheer Hall

Most bars will be broadcasting the World Cup game this weekend but to celebrate it in true Deutsch fashion, Ridgewood and Glendale maintain a healthy group of German bars that harken back to the German ancestry of the area.

Gottscheer Hall on Fairview Avenue will be open on Sunday, a day that they usually close on, for the game. Roland Belay, who is the secretary for the bar and grill, plans to meet the game between Germany and Argentina with a full force of potato pancakes with applesauce, goulash , bratwurst, German pretzels and a whole menu of German-Austrian food that is sehr gut.

“The whole purpose of this building is to maintain our heritage,” said Belay, whose parents left the once Austrian-owned Gottschee region. “It’s a very homey atmosphere and we keep all the traditions alive here.”

Other German bars in the area to watch the game include: Zum Stammtisch and Celtic Gasthau on Myrtle Avenue, and Manor Oktoberfest on Cooper Avenue.

“This is definitely the area for German fans to hang out,” Belay said. “But we won’t be mean to the other side.”

 

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Restoration project for Glendale library unveiled


| ejankiewicz@queenscourier.com

Courtesy of Queens Library

Queens Library announced its plans to restore Glendale’s library to its former glory and make it more  accessible to the handicapped.

The library on 73rd Place was built in 1935 and since then little has been done to alter or improve the building, according to the project’s architect Matthew Baird. The budget for the project is $2.8 million and with this money, Baird plans on installing an elevator and restoring the interior and the attached garden.

The restoration team, which is part of the Department of Design and Construction, expects to start construction in 2017.

“It’s an incredible facility and we’d like to restore it to its grandeur,” Baird said during a Community Board 5 meeting. “It will be a fantastic place to be.”

The restoration project will also open up some windows that had been covered in bricks over the years, preventing light from entering the second floor. The bookshelves are battered and worn, something Baird wants to change by cleaning the shelves as well as much of the building.

When the library first opened, the garden was well-manicured but since then, the vegetation has become overgrown and Baird wants to not only trim the overgrowth but also install chairs so people can read outside.

The installation of a new elevator is an attempt to make the building more accessible to handicapped people. There will also be a new handicapped entrance on the Myrtle Avenue side.

Councilwoman Elizabeth Crowley secured the $2.8 million through the City Council’s budget but the funds fall short of satisfying all of the library’s needs.

On the first floor there is a once vibrant mural that is now dull and dirty, but the project does not include funds to restore the artwork.

 

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Glendale business aims to showcase local artists


| ejankiewicz@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/ Photo by Eric Jankiewicz

The arts are coming to Glendale.

Angelica Harris runs the Excalibur Reading Program on 78th Avenue, and she hopes to transform the center into an art venue once a week.

“We don’t have a program or venue that showcases Glendale artists,” Harris said. “It’s my dream to bring the arts to Glendale.”

Harris plans on booking musicians and poets every Friday evening to showcase their work to an audience of about 30 people. The July 18 event kicks off a new feature that Harris hopes will become a staple every week.

“I want to expose artists and educate people about the need for art in the community,” said Harris, who has run the learning and tutoring programs on 78th Avenue for two years.

Bill McClure, a landscape painter and window designer, has lived in Glendale for a year and said that the creation of an art night is welcome news.

“It’s wonderful because we need places for artists to communicate and there’s nothing in the Glendale area,” he said.

Since moving to Glendale, McClure has had to leave the neighborhood to showcase his work.

But with the new venue, McClure, 52, plans to exhibit his work locally.

Harris, who has lived in Glendale for 20 years, is asking people who want to watch the music and poetry show to make a $10 donation.

Harris has a personal devotion to the arts, having written several books, including “Living With Rage,” which recounts the domestic violence she experienced.

“The arts were my salvation, my sanity,” she said. “That’s why I have this dream of the art program. I want people to talk about what art helps them with.”

 

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Glendale pastor writes YA self-help book


| ejankiewicz@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/ Photo by Eric Jankiewicz

Writing a successful book for young adults can be hard if it doesn’t have magic and vampires in it.

But a pastor in a Glendale church wrote a book aimed to help troubled teenagers in 2011, and since then, the book has taken on a second life, spurring the creation of conventions and a clothing company.

Even a hip-hop group called Social Club released an album called “Misfits 2” which features the pastor rapping in a song.

The Rev. Chris Durso, a pastor in Christ Tabernacle, wrote “Misfit” in 2011 and since then interest in the book has become national, with religious youth conferences called MISFIT Tours being held in Washington, D.C., and other places. These conferences have attracted Christian rappers like “Da’ Truth” and Sean Simmonds. And in August, there will be another MISFIT conference.

“I had no idea that the book would get so big,” Durso said. “I never sought out to be an author. I grew up diagnosed with ADD and I never read many books. So it’s pretty ironic.”

The book reads like a self-help book and in the first few pages Durso writes about a student, Eugene, he knew in school who committed suicide. Durso wrote the book in the hopes that today’s youth won’t go down the same path.

“I didn’t want the book to read like I’m telling the reader what to do,” Durso said. “I wanted it to feel like we’re on a journey together.”

Along with the periodic tours, Durso, who is the youth minister, holds a youth group meeting at the church called Misfit NYC. Every Friday, kids from the area and all over the city sing, rap and hold a religious service. The group, led by Durso, discusses many of the issues that are in the book: being yourself instead of conforming to others and pursuing goals in life that are personally worthwhile.

“I want this book to spur you on and reach your goals,” Durso said. “There are too few revolutionaries in this world and if we had more we could see this world in a much better state.”

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Stats show universal pre-K’s limited reach in western, central Queens


| ejankiewicz@queenscourier.com

Photo by Rob Bennett for the Office of Mayor Bill de Blasio

Only 30 percent of 4-year-olds in parts of western and central Queens got into the pre-K of their choice, the lowest percentage of matched applicants in all of New York City.

Parents in Queens District 24 — Corona, Glendale, Ridgewood, Elmhurst, Long Island City, Maspeth and Middle Village — must now search for an alternative to public schools.

According to the Department of Education, the majority of parents with 4-year-olds — 70 percent — in the district recently received letters informing them that the public pre-K of their choice was already full.

In comparison, in Manhattan’s District 1 only 10 percent of applicants were unmatched and, overall, 38 percent of applicants throughout New York City were unmatched.

“Every single school in this district is overcrowded,” said Nick Comaianni, president of School Board District 24. “In the past we’ve actually had to get rid of pre-K seats to make room for kindergarten to fifth grade.”

As the city changes gears for Mayor Bill de Blasio’s aim to make pre-K universal, the DOE is using community-based organizations like local YMCAs and mom-and-pop pre-K programs to scoop up the applicants that didn’t get into a public school pre-K.

But Comaianni, who has been president of the board for 11 years, believes that the mayor’s office and the DOE are moving too fast.

“Someone should’ve done their homework before pushing pre-K through so quickly,” he said, noting that since the schools in the district are already overcrowded, there is no extra space for more students. “You can’t have pre-K if you don’t even have second grade.”

The DOE is opening up 53,000 full-day seats through community-based organizations in time for the new school year in September. While this will still leave some toddlers behind, by next year there will be 73,250 seats, enough to put every 4-year-old in New York City in school, according to education officials.

Which is just fine, Comaianni said, but warned: “In our haste to open these seats let’s hope we have qualified people who can teach pre-K and it’s not just a baby-sitting center.

Queens by school district:

Source: Office of Student Enrollment

 

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