Tag Archives: Glendale Civilian Observation Patrol

104COP thanks Frank Kotnik for 25 years of service


| agiudice@ridgewoodtimes.com

RIDGEWOOD TIMES/Photos by Anthony Giudice

For 25 years Frank Kotnik has served the communities of Glendale, Middle Village, Maspeth and Ridgewood as a member of the 104 Civilian Observation Patrol (104COP), formerly known as G-COP (Glendale Civilian Observation Patrol).

During those two and a half decades, Kotnik devoted his time and energy to making those communities as safe as he could by organizing patrols, coordinating parades and lending help during times of need, such as after 9/11 and Superstorm Sandy.

At Thursday night’s 104COP meeting at Christ the King High School in Middle Village, family, friends, colleagues and local politicians surprised Kotnik to celebrate his 25 years of service as he stepped down as president of 104COP.

As his final act as president, Kotnik handed over the gavel to Mark Pearson, the new president of 104COP. Although Kotnik stepped down as president, he will remain an active member of the board.

After the installation of all the newly elected officers of 104COP, the guests began showering Kotnik with thanks and gifts.

State Senator Joseph Addabbo presented Kotnik with a proclamation from the New York Senate, thanking him for his years of dedication to the communities that 104COP serves and for lending help to other communities in need.

“I will forever be grateful to 104COP, and to Frank, because a third of my district was severely impacted by Sandy,” Addabbo said. “And Frank led the charge down there for many of you members to help my people after Sandy. And I don’t mean a month after Sandy, but days, hours after Sandy, Frank was helping my constituents, who are still hurting. So for that I will forever grateful to Frank, so thank you.”

Kotnik was honored by Councilwoman Elizabeth Crowley and Councilman Antonio Reynoso with a proclamation, thanking him for his service.

“When I think of G-COP, I think of Frank,” Crowley said. “He’s always been president and the leader, and there is no other organization in the city of New York like G-COP.”

“As the newest member of this elite team here, let me tell you, I just wanted to say, Frank, I think I graduated preschool when you started at G-COP,” Reynoso said, to which the crowd erupted with laughter. “That speaks less of my age and more of his commitment to the mission of G-COP. A lot of people do things in short [stints], but he made a commitment to this community for much longer than that…and I truly want to thank you.”

Commanding Officer of the 104th Precinct, Captain Mark Wachter, personally thanked Kotnik for helping to keep the communities he has lived in since he was a child safe for so many years.

“Frank watched out for this community when I was very young,” Wachter said. “Because of Frank and the members of G-COP, this community is still safe. So on that personal level Frank, I thank you.”

Wacther then presented Kotnik with a plaque from the NYPD, thanking him for his years of service.

Among the others that honored Kotnik throughout the evening were representatives from Borough President Melinda Katz’s office, Captain John Travaglia, commanding officer of the 108th Precinct, representatives from the 104th Precinct Community Council, and the members of 104COP.

Kotnik thanked everyone for their love and support, now and over the years.

“Thank you, thank you for the support,” Kotnik said. “One thing that was forgotten, I know everyone is saying it was me, but it was ‘we.’ This patrol is always, as far as I’m concerned, is ‘we.’ We were going to do this together…All I can say to everybody, thank you for coming, God bless you all.”

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St. Pancras celebrates Irish tradition with St. Patrick’s Day Dinner and Dance


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Liam La Guerre

Follow me @liamlaguerre

 

St. Pancras School in Glendale hosted its annual St. Patrick’s Day Dinner and Dance on Saturday, March 9, to celebrate Irish tradition and school pride.

More than 150 alums and residents of various cultures attended the event.

There were raffles at the dinner, with all proceeds going to purchase a new SMART Board for the school.

Although St. Patrick’s Day isn’t until March 17, attendees donned green robes, shirts, ties and hats. There was traditional Celtic food, including corned beef and cabbage, and women performed Irish step dancing.

People also danced to live music by the Boston Burglars, an Irish American band that plays rock and roll.

“We wanted the St. Pancras school alumni to come back and celebrate with us every year on this very important occasion,” said Glendale Civilian Observation Patrol president Frank Kotnik, who is a St. Pancras alum and was the emcee at the event. “You didn’t have to be Irish to come here. It makes no difference. This is a school, parish, alumni thing.”

 

 

 

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City green spaces to get more staff


| mhayes@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Maggie Hayes

Juniper Valley Park is just one green space in the borough that will soon get more supervision. The City’s Parks Department is significantly increasing its staff to include 81 new Parks Enforcement Patrol (PEP) officers who will protect park rules and assets in Queens and the rest of the city. The new hires will also include 207 city park workers, 96 maintenance and trade workers and 30 climbers and pruners to preserve trees, according to a Parks spokesperson.

The plans received a warm welcome in the southwest community, where many say that their parks, especially Juniper Valley, need extra eyes.

“It’s long overdue,” said Frank Kotnik, president of the 104th Precinct’s Glendale Civilian Observation Patrol (G-COP).

Robert Holden, president of the Juniper Park Civic Association, said that Juniper Valley Park had “a tenth of the officers that they’ve needed” in the past.

“Any investment in PEP officers is a good investment,” he said. “There’s vandalism in the park, people who don’t respect park regulations. The cops are spread so thinly at this point that they really can’t handle all of the park’s complaints.”

The Parks spokesperson attributed the shortage of PEP officers to the fiscal crisis, As a result, the workforce has not kept pace with its growing infrastructure, the representative added.

The Parks Department said 12 PEP officers and six Urban Park Rangers currently patrol Queens parks, adding that its 2014 budget allows for the additional staffing that will be spread throughout the city.

The specific number of officers coming to Queens this summer is not yet known.
Holden said that however many officers are coming, the community “needs them working,” especially on off-hours such as nights and weekends.

“In Juniper, there are 10 times as many people there on the weekends. If there are no officers, it’s almost a free-for-all,” he said. “We have picnics going on, and people driving through on [illegal] four wheelers.”

“It has been difficult to get an officer there during the evening or on the weekends when the parks really need to be protected,” he added.

When Holden heard complaints in the past, he used his own police connections to attempt to get an officer to the park.

He hopes Juniper Valley Park will see an increase in patrol staff to help alleviate the problems.

“PEP officers are certainly welcome,” he said. “But we need to know where they are going to be deployed. It’s great news, but I’m not going to jump up and down with joy.”

 

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Glendale Civilian Observation Patrol looking for a few good men


| mhayes@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Maggie Hayes

The Glendale Civilian Observation Patrol (G-COP) has served as the “extended eyes and ears” of the NYPD for over 30 years — and they want you to help keep their mission alive.

“We don’t complain about crime, we do something about it,” said Frank Kotnik, G-COP president.
In the late 1990s, the volunteer group was asked to expand and help patrol within the confines of the 104th Precinct, and have since performed regular checks throughout Maspeth, Ridgewood, Middle Village and Glendale. They use their own vehicles, and two to three times a week send out three to four cars, with two people in each car.

“[G-COP is] essential to us,” said Officer Thomas Bell of the 104th Precinct. “They deeply care about the community that they serve.”

Currently, the group has 50 active members, but Kotnik has dreams of growing to 150 reliable, dedicated patrollers.

“People want to join something that is proactive, not stagnant,” said the longtime president. “That’s what we are — we’re leading with example, we’re getting out there.”

Founded in 1976, G-COP’s structure and loyal members have made the group strong enough to withstand the test of time.

“You get out of something what you put into it,” said Kotnik. “And I think there are a lot more able-bodied men and women that could step up to the plate.”

Mainly, G-COP takes direction from the 104th Precinct and does everything from checking out suspicious scenes to directing traffic during a parade. Kotnik recalled various incidents in which they helped aid lost children and women in distress, and locked up graffiti vandals.

Although patrols are typically only a few times a week, if “necessary, they’ll be out every day,” according to Kotnik. Most recently, during Sandy, members of G-COP had a constant presence both within the community and in the disaster-stricken areas of south Queens. They worked around the clock, cleaning up their local area, and busing truckloads of essential items down to the storm victims.
Since the storm has passed, Kotnik and his group have returned to regular patrols, and creating a sense of safety within the community.

“The more volunteers, the merrier,” said Bell. “They’re definitely eyes out there. They’re always quick to respond, to lend a hand.”

The NYPD is waiting for end-of-year reports to come out that will detail crime statistics within each precinct, but Bell said that G-COP is an important addition in controlling various situations.

Ideally, Kotnik hopes to grow to more frequent patrols and expand their presence even further. To join, applicants must live within the 104th Precinct and be at least 18 years of age. Applications can be obtained on the group’s website, g-cop.org, or by going to the monthly meeting, held the second Thursday of each month at the St. Pancras School in Glendale at 8 p.m. G-COP hopefuls will then be subjected to background checks.

“These people come from all walks of life, we welcome everybody,” said Kotnik.

 

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Star of Queens: Frank Kotnik (President of the Glendale Civilian Observation Patrol)


| jlane@queenscourier.com

doc4e89b0d2a1b11421073669

COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT: For the past 11 years, Frank Kotnik has been the president of the Glendale Civilian Observation Patrol (G-COP), an organization that patrols the area in the 104th Precinct in private unmarked vehicles and reports all police, fire and medical emergencies to the proper authorities via radio. He has also been the Democratic District Leader for about three years and has been involved with the St. Patrick’s School advisory board in order to raise their enrollment.

PERSONAL: Kotnik has lived in Glendale his whole life. He has been married for 26 years and has a 10-year-old son. He enjoys spending time with his family, such as going to the beach, taking his son to karate and playing Lionel trains with him. Kotnik also stays in shape by playing golf twice a week.

BIGGEST CHALLENGE: “Trying to recruit new members. Due to the lack of police manpower in the 104th Precinct, G-COP urges all concerned residents of Glendale, Ridgewood, Maspeth and Middle Village to help us preserve, protect and enhance the quality of life in our communities. In other words, get off your rear and volunteer.”

FAVORITE MEMORY: “Meeting my wife and watching the birth of my son.”

INSPIRATION: To “preserve, protect, and enhance the quality of life is what keeps me going. I still have my 1976 Firebird parked in my garage. I would like to restore it one day and possibly take it around with my wife and my son, like the good old days.”