Tag Archives: Glen Oaks

Glen Oaks elementary school donates to military veterans


| mchan@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Melissa Chan

A Glen Oaks elementary school has donated $1,000 to military veterans.

Youngsters at P.S. 115 presented a check to Services for the UnderServed (SUS) on Friday, March 15. The funds were allocated for SUS programs that support the country’s veterans.

“It really touches an old man’s heart,” said Howard Wheeler of Elmhurst, who served 22 years in the U.S. Navy. “It means so much to us that you all, as young as you are, have the mind to think of others than yourself.”

The pre-kindergarten through fifth grade students raised funds through a bake sale and a school dance. They then worked with AmeriCorps, a federal government program focusing on community service, to connect with SUS.

“It’s an extraordinary gesture on their part,” said Kevin Burke, the school’s parent coordinator. “These children are our future. It’s very important that they recognize the history of our country and know there are people that commit themselves in protecting our country.”

P.S. 115 plans to hold another bake sale at the school on April 22.

“It’s a very, very selfless act,” Staff Sergeant Nicole Robinson of the Army Reserves said to the students. “You guys are future soldiers for change. You did a very good thing.”

 

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Queens’ Morning Roundup


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

TODAY’S FORECAST

Thursday: Overcast in the morning, then partly cloudy. High of 25 with a windchill as low as 3. Windy. Winds from the NNW at 15 to 25 mph with gusts to 35 mph. Thursday night: Clear. Low of 12F with a windchill as low as 0. Breezy. Winds from the NW at 10 to 20 mph with gusts to 30 mph.

EVENT OF THE DAY: Beer Pairing Dinner

Come to Alobar in LIC on January 24 for a five course tasting menu and beer pairing courtesy of Brewery Ommegang. $55 for the beer and food. Call 718-752-6000 to make reservations. Click here for more info or to submit an event of your own

Housing prices rise in Astoria and Long Island City

Real estate prices and rents in Long Island City and Astoria are on the rise, especially in the luxury housing market, where there isn’t enough supply to meet demand, a new report shows. Read more: New York Daily News

Woodside merchants say they’re losing business to evening ‘No Parking’ zone on Roosevelt Ave.

Woodside merchants are urging the city to lift a weekday parking restriction on Roosevelt Ave. because they say it’s unnecessary and bad for business. Read more: New York Daily News

Cold weather stretch makes life dangerous for Sandy victims

Looking at the job ahead of him, Alberto Pizarro said he’s taking a break from helping his neighbor, William Farrell rebuild his home this week. The men said they can’t go any further until a new boiler is installed, and one small space heater isn’t cutting it. Read more: NY1

1 dead, 1 critical after being struck in separate Queens car accidents

An elderly man is dead and another is fighting for his life after the two were involved in separate accidents within five minutes of each other in Queens, cops said. Read more: New York Post

Defiant Secretary of State Clinton takes on lawmakers over Benghazi attack

Tempers flared Wednesday when Secretary of State Hillary Clinton defended her actions following the deadly attack on the American consulate in Libya. Read more: CBS New York

Military has to decide which combat jobs for women

The Pentagon’s decision to lift the ban on women serving in combat presents a daunting challenge to top military leaders who now will have to decide which, if any, jobs they believe should be open only to men. Read more: AP

 

$17M facelift for Glen Oaks library


| mchan@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Queens Public Library

A $17 million facelift will soon bring chic changes to a Glen Oaks library, officials said.

A sweeping interior staircase, a sky-lit reading lounge and a partially transparent exterior are some of the modern designs being built at the 255-01 Union Turnpike site of the Glen Oaks branch of the Queens Library.

“We’re very excited about it,” said Bob Friedrich, president of Glen Oaks Village. “It’s a really beautifully designed library, as opposed to the old one that had more of a concrete box-like structure with very few windows.”

Officials said the library, built in 1956, was becoming too small for the growing Glen Oaks population. Renovations will nearly double the size of the library to 18,000-square-feet and include many new customer service features along its three levels, including more computer workstations, separate areas for adults, teens and children, and an outdoor reading space.

“I think this library will attract a lot more people,” Friedrich said. “The community really needs it. We have a lot of seniors in Glen Oaks who love sitting outside to read.”

The new library is slated to open later this spring, officials said. Bookworms can visit the library’s temporary space across the street until construction is completed.

“This state-of-the-art library will be a terrific asset for the community,” said Councilmember Mark Weprin, who helped fund the improvement project with Mayor Michael Bloomberg.

 

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$120M psychiatric pavilion set to open in Glen Oaks


| mchan@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Melissa Chan

A multimillion dollar psychiatric pavilion in Glen Oaks is slated to open its doors to inpatients next month.

Zucker Hillside Hospital officials celebrated the $120 million project on December 7. The 130,000-square-foot facility, which has 115 beds, also includes a center for dementia patients and a new electroconvulsive therapy unit.

“The mental health system in this country is broken and deteriorated. Our pledge is, not [broken] in this hospital, not in our health system, not in our communities,” said Joseph Schulman, executive director of Zucker Hillside.

The two-story pavilion, located at 75-59 263rd Street, will treat patients suffering with depression, mood and affective disorders, substance abuse and dementia when it opens on January 8, officials said.

“Psychiatric illness and addiction cause heartache and alter lives. Their devastating impact scars families for generations,” said Dr. John Kane, vice president of the Behavioral Health Services for North Shore-LIJ. “This new pavilion will help us treat these disorders to change that, healing families and returning people to society’s mainstream.”

According to Kane, behavioral health disorders affect nearly half the population during the course of a lifetime and account for more disability and missed days of work than any other illness.

Queens Hospital Center cut the ribbon on an 8,500-square-foot expanded psychiatric program last week, but Kane said the recent sprouting of facilities does not mean there is an increase in a total number of beds in the community.

The needs of many mentally ill individuals are still not met, he said, and the emergence of local centers may only indicate a rebuilding of state-of-the-art facilities.

“In the last 10 years, the health system has made a tremendous investment in both inpatient and outpatient care, and that’s what we need,” Kane said.

Cathie Lemaire, of Huntington, said she has been hospitalized five times for severe depression and said the illness sidetracked her life for many years until Zucker Hillside suggested she try electroconvulsive therapy.

“I had great careers in sales, in electronics. I was selling to military and commercial contractors, but I would have repeated depressive episodes,” she said. “[Zucker Hillside] has allowed me to get back to my life, to my old self, to living. It’s priceless.”

Halloween events in Queens


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

File photo

Here’s your guide to all the Halloween happenings in Queens this October.

Pumpkin Patch
Queens County Farm Museum
73-50 Little Neck Parkway, Glen Oaks
Thru October 28
Saturdays & Sundays
11:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

Haunted House at the Poppenhusen

The Poppenhusen Institute
114-04 14th Road College Point
Friday, October 26-Saturday, October 27
Wednesday, October 31
5:00-6:00 p.m. (ages 6-8), 6:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m. (ages 8 and up)

Halloween Haunted House

Queens County Farm Museum
73-50 Little Neck Parkway, Glen Oaks
Friday, October 26 – Sunday, October 28
4:00 p.m.-7:00 p.m.

Children’s Fall Festival
Queens County Farm Museum
73-50 Little Neck Parkway, Glen Oaks
Sunday, October 28
11:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.

Dead or Alive
New York Hall of Science
47-01 111 Street, Corona
Friday, October 26 – Sunday, October 28

Thriller at the Battery
Fort Totten Park
Cross Island Parkway between Totten Avenue and 15 Road
Friday, October 26
6:00 p.m.-8:00 p.m.

Boo at the Zoo
Queens Zoo
53-51 111th Street, Flushing Meadows-Corona Park
Saturday, October 27-Sunday, October 28
11 a.m.-4 p.m.

Halloween Walking Tour
Hell Gate Bridge, Astoria Park (on Shore Boulevard)
Saturday, October 27
11 a.m.

Rockaway Canine Festival
Rockaway Freeway Dog Park
Beach Channel Drive at Beach 84 Street, Rockaway Beach
Saturday, October 27
11 a.m.-1 p.m.

Family Halloweenfest
Jamaica Center for Arts & Learning
161-04 Jamaica Avenue, Jamaica
Saturday, October 27
11 a.m.-4 p.m.

Trick or Treat!
Louis Armstrong House Museum
34-56 107 Street, Corona
Saturday, October 27
1 p.m.-4 p.m.

3rd Annual Halloween Costume Party
Flushing Town Hall
137-35 Northern Boulevard, Flushing
Saturday, October 27
8 p.m.

Bayside Village Halloween Family Festival

Bell Boulevard

between Northern Boulevard and 35th Avenue

Saturday, October 27

Noon-5 p.m.

Halloween-Remixed

Flushing Town Hall
137-35 Northern Boulevard, Flushing
Sunday, October 28
12:00 p.m.

Halloween on Ice
City Ice Pavilion
47-32 32 Place, Long Island City
Sunday, October 28
12:00 pm.-3:50 p.m.

CenterStage Halloween Concert
Sky View Center
40-24 College Point Boulevard, Flushing
Sunday, October 28
3:30 p.m.

Haunted Halloween Hike
Alley Pond Environmental Center
228-06 Northern Boulevard, Douglaston
Monday, October 29
4:30 p.m. (ages 5-7), 6:30 p.m. (ages 8-12)

Shocktoberfest
Playground For All Children
Flushing Meadows-Corona Park
Tuesday, October 30
4:00 p.m.-8:00 p.m.

Queens Zoo Trick & Treating and Halloween Festivities
Queens Zoo
53-51 111th Street, Flushing Meadows-Corona Park
Wednesday, October 31
3:00–5:00 p.m.

Jackson Heights Halloween Parade
Line up near P.S. 222  (87th Street and 37th Avenue)
Wednesday, October 31
5 p.m.

Halloween Party! Devil Science Theater 3K
Laughing Devil Comedy Club
47-38 Vernon Boulevard, Long Island City
Wednesday, October 31
8 p.m.

 

 

Queens communities facing brownouts


| brennison@queenscourier.com

Several Queens communities face a voltage reduction from Con Edison due to electrical equipment problems.

The 100 degree heat has many residents blasting air conditioners to stay cool.

Con Ed said the neighborhoods affected will have a 5 percent voltage reduction.  This was done in an effort to prevent a significant outage, a spokesperson from the company said.

There are about 20 individual  outages in Queens right now according to Con Edison’s outage map.

The reduction will occur in Bellerose, Cambria Heights, Floral Park, Forest Hills, Glendale, Glen Oaks, Hollis, Jamaica, Jamaica Hills, Laurelton, Middle Village, Queens Village, South Jamaica, Springfield Gardens and St. Albans.

Con Edison asked customers in these areas to conserve electricity and turn off nonessential electric equipment, such as TVs, computers, air conditioners, washers, dryers, and microwaves.

To report power outages or service problems visit www.conEd.com or call 800-75-CONED (6633). When reporting an outage, customers should have their Con Edison account number available, if possible, and report whether their neighbors also have lost power.

 

Bank helps customers prepare for retirement


| tpetropoulosedit@queenscourier.com

The Courier/Photos

The road to retirement is often a tricky one, with many obstacles along the way.

On April 18, Dime Savings Bank tried to make that road a little smoother by hosting a dinner to discuss options for retirement with select customers at Luigi’s Italian Restaurant in Glen Oaks.

This is the third event of its kind the bank has done this year and the first in Queens.

“We believe that it is our responsibility as their bank to educate them on all the options that are available so they can make more money,” said Larry Kinitsky, Senior Vice President of Marketing at The Dime Savings Bank of Williamsburg, which helped organize the event. “In this event, we educate and reward our customers, let them have dinner and have a good time while also getting educated.”

In between a dinner of Italian specialties and a desert of assorted pastries, Mary Ferrante, regional vice president for U.S. Life, a partner of Dime Bank, gave a PowerPoint presentation and fielded questions from the roughly 45 attendees.

Ferrante discussed how planning for retirement has changed over the years, how every individual should have a specific plan, and the benefit of annuities.
“We all dream that when we are retired we can sit and relax in our rocking chairs,” said Ferrante. “No one wants to be in their rocking chair worrying about where their money is going.”

Branch managers from Garden City, Bayside, Hillcrest and Glen Oaks were also at the event, mingling with guests and giving one-on-one advice.

“I think the event was very informative and I learned a lot,” said attendee Carolyn Sorrentino. “It was absolutely better than anything I would have expected.”

Eastern Queens joining together to be less divided


| mpantelidis@queenscourier.com

Eastern Queens is uniting in a fight to make district lines dividing the community disappear.

A group of civic associations, local leaders and concerned residents from Glen Oaks, Floral Park, New Hyde Park, Bellerose and Queens Village have joined forces to form Eastern Queens United, a coalition demanding their neighborhoods be rejoined in the same congressional and assembly districts.

“We need district lines that will unite us, not divide us,” said Bob Friedrich, president of Glen Oaks Village. “Regardless of color, nationality, religion or cultural identity, we all care about our families, our schools, our jobs, our safety and our community. This is the glue of commonality that keeps us together.”

Eastern Queens United is urging the Legislative Task Force on Demographic Research and Reapportionment (LATFOR) to undo what the group calls the “gerrymandering” of the neighborhoods between Assembly Districts 24,26 and 33 and unite the area into a single district. The coalition also wants the division of the community between Congressional Districts 5 and 6 to be resolved. The neighborhoods are currently united in a single state Senate and city council district.

“We are a single ‘community of interest’ that needs to stay united in all legislative districts,” said Ali Najmi, an attorney, lead organizer and counsel to Eastern Queens United. “LATFOR must not divide us.”

To gather supporters for their cause, Eastern Queens United is planning a community meeting and rally in the near future.

The group argues that the dividing lines are detrimental to the community, separating residents and preventing them from improving the standard of living in the neighborhoods.

“For those of us on the front lines fighting for quality-of-life issues, reduced property taxes and other issues that affect us every day, we know how important these district lines are,” said Angela Augugliaro, president of Queens Colony Civic Association. “We have a unique community that can only have its interest served if we are united within the same legislative districts.”

LATFOR will make recommendations to the New York State Legislature regarding district lines early next year, after which its proposal must be voted upon and approved by Governor Andrew Cuomo.

The neighborhoods were separated roughly 10 years ago, and Friedrich says if the group is unable to foster change, the communities will remain divided for another decade. “We want to make sure they don’t do to us what they did 10 years ago,” he said. “These lines were drawn for political considerations only, and not for what is best for the community. District lines run right through some communities, which is confusing and detrimental to the neighborhood. We will not accept district lines that slice and dice us as if we are on some legislative committee’s chopping block.”