Tag Archives: gas shortage

Governor Cuomo: Require gas stations to have generators


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/File photo

Governor Andrew Cuomo has proposed legislation that would require approximately half the gas stations in the state to have a backup generator for use during a fuel supply or energy emergency.

“New York State must learn the lessons from superstorm Sandy so that we are better prepared for the future,” said Cuomo. “This plan will prevent the long lines, delays and frustrations caused by gas stations being forced to close when they lose power.”

Under the governor’s proposal, all gas stations within a half-mile of highway exits and hurricane evacuation routes as well as any newly constructed gas stations or ones that have had major renovations would need to comply to the requirements by March 1, 2014.

Additionally, chains with 10 or more gas stations under common ownership in any region of the state would also need to have an additional 50 percent of their stations pre-wired for a generator by March 1, 2016. In the case of a power outage, those stations would have 48 hours to install and deploy a generator in a fuel or energy emergency.

If a station fails to adhere to the new law, they will face a penalty of up to $2,000 per day.

Calls to several Queens gas stations revealed that most do not have generators and are not planning on getting one. When asked why they didn’t have one, most stations cited cost concerns or lack of necessity as reasons.

Cuomo’s proposed legislation includes grants of up to $10,000 per gas station to help ease the financial burden of installing generators, but the governor’s proposal doesn’t address other obstacles stations faced during Sandy.
Joe Yun, an employee at a Citgo station on 35th Avenue and Bell Boulevard, which suffered long lines and fuel shortages during Sandy, said that a backup generator wouldn’t have helped them in that situation.

The station had no power problems, and ran out of fuel when another issue disrupted the station’s regular fuel delivery schedule.

“[The refineries] got flooded,” explained Yun. “We couldn’t get gas here.”

Map courtesy of Governor Cuomo’s Office

 

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Blizzard causes long gas lines, shortages reminiscent of Sandy


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photos by Maggie Hayes

Though Friday’s blizzard won’t be as devastating as Sandy, at several area gas stations there have been long lines reminiscent of the fuel shortage following the superstorm.

On Thursday evening, a line at a gas station in Whitestone off of Clintonville Street stretched around the block, but that wasn’t the only location in the tri-state area with significant waits.

Other local media outlets have been reporting long lines at stations in Long Island, New Jersey and New England also.

In Queens, the gas guzzling is still going on as of this morning. At a 35th Avenue and Bell Boulevard gas stations, the drivers had to wait awhile to fill their tanks, and nearby, a Gulf station on Bell Boulevard and 23rd Avenue had even run out of fuel.

A Mobile station at 172-11 Northern Boulevard was also out of gas, but didn’t think believe the fuel shortage was because of the storm, saying it was more of a logistical thing.”

Other Queens gas stations without fuel as of Friday morning were a Mobile station at 181-08 Northern Boulevard and one at  69-02 Queens Boulevard that is expecting a delivery this afternoon.

On The Courier Facebook page some questioned why people would need to get gas since the storm will prevent drivers from hitting the road, but others worried about another situation similar to Sandy.

“The lines are getting longer all over, said Eleni Lenitsa. “Think we’ll have a shortage again?”

But at a 1 p.m. storm briefing today, Mayor Michael Bloomberg said that there is no need to panic about gas shortages. “The gas supply is plentiful and deliveries won’t be disrupted,” he said.

 

With additional reporting by Maggie Hayes, Anthony O’Reilly and Toni Cimino 

 

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City gas rationing to end Saturday


| brennison@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Maggie Hayes

Two weeks after the mayor activated odd/even gas rationing, he announced any car, regardless of license plate number, will be able to fill up beginning tomorrow.

Beginning Friday, November 9, Mayor Michael Bloomberg instituted a rationing system to ease long lines at gas stations amidst a post-Sandy fuel shortage.

“With more than 85 percent of gas stations now operating – a substantial increase from just 25 percent two weeks ago – and Thanksgiving and Black Friday behind us, the odd-even license plate system will be rescinded starting tomorrow morning,” said Bloomberg.

In the week following the storm, stations throughout the city with gas featured three-hour long waits to fill-up.  In the days after rationing began, the lines dwindled back to normal.

The mayor last week extended the rationing until at least Black Friday to assure all drivers would be able to travel during one of the busiest travel times of the year.

 

 

3 Queens gas stations accused of price gouging


| brennison@queenscourier.com

gas 1

As lines grew at gas stations throughout Queens, prices at the pump swelled as well, prompting an investigation into gouging.

State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman announced the first series of actions in what his office called “a wide-ranging investigation” into post-Sandy price gouging at gas stations throughout New York. The attorney general plans to begin enforcement proceedings against the 13 New York gas stations, while investigating hundreds of others.

“Our office has zero tolerance for price gouging and we are taking action to send a message that ripping off New Yorkers is against the law,” said Schneiderman.

Three of the targeted gas stations are in Queens:

• The Mobil station at 40-40 Crescent Street in Long Island City, which according to consumer complaints charged customers $4.89.

• The Shell at 71-08 Northern Boulevard in Jackson Heights, where customer complaints said drivers were charged $5.50.

• The Delta station at 13-09 14th Avenue in College Point, which charged $5, according to consumer complaints.

According to the state’s business laws, merchants are prohibited from taking advantage of consumers during an “abnormal disruption of the market” by hiking prices to an “unconscionably excessive price.”

While “unconscionably excessive price” is not specifically defined, the attorney general’s office said a before and after analysis of prices can be used as evidence.

Gas prices jumped 15 cents in the two weeks after Superstorm Sandy, even as gas prices nationwide fell.

“These 13 retailers stand out from others in the high prices they have charged and in the size of their price increases,” Schneiderman said.

Schneiderman said that the L.I.C. Mobil station had a posted price of $3.89, but after waiting on a three-block line, the consumer found the price at the pump to be a dollar higher. The station would not comment on the investigation.

A worker at the Delta station said they were forced to up prices after the cost of the gas they were buying also rose.

After Sandy, the station was paying $3.89 per gallon, a 48 cent jump from before the storm, according to receipts.

Six employees, up from one, were also working around the clock at the full-service station to keep up with the demand, which pushed prices higher, said the employee, John, who did not want to give his last name.

“What were we going to do, take the money out of our pocket? No, you put it in the price,” said John, who also said that the station’s prices never went above $4.50.

If gas stations can justify why their costs went up, they will not be charged, said the attorney general’s office.

Penalties for price gouging includes fines, which are calculated based on how much illegal profits were made, according to the attorney general’s office.

Councilmember Peter Vallone does not think the punishment goes far enough.

“Clearly, the penalties that exist are insufficient to protect the public in times of crisis,” Vallone said. “These gas stations in particular apparently see fines as the cost of doing business. Anyone who would try to profit from another person’s pain during an emergency deserves to face jail time.”

What took so long?


| qceditorial@queenscourier.com

So, after waiting . . . and waiting . . . and waiting . . . in line for gas, Mayor Michael Bloomberg finally heard our pleas and decided to institute the odd/even method.

And guess what? It seems to have worked.

Over the weekend lines were shorter, motorists were able to top off their tanks, and most of all, drivers were happier.

Only one question remains – what took so long?

New Jersey Governor Chris Christie implemented rationing right after Superstorm Sandy, and filling up in the Garden State went much more smoothly.

So let’s make this a lesson learned – next time, if there is a next time – follow the leader.

 

Long lines, wait times at gas stations cut


| brennison@queenscourier.com

DSC_0322w

As motorists are finally feeling less pain at the pump, with long lines and wait times drastically cut, many are asking what took the mayor so long.

“Last week, I waited for more than three hours on line and got no gas. Today, I waited under a half hour,” said Thomas Colwell, at a gas station at the intersection of Cooper and Myrtle Avenues in Glendale on Monday, November 12.  “Why wasn’t this done two weeks ago.”

Mayor Michael Bloomberg ordered odd-even gas rationing beginning Friday, November 9, which greatly reduced lines at stations throughout the city even as fuel remains scarce.

While many wondered why New York City didn’t follow New Jersey’s lead and begin rationing the weekend after Sandy, Robert Sinclair, a spokesperson for AAA, said the city may not have realized the scale of the shortage.

“I think the administration was dealing with a problem they didn’t fully understand then,” he said.

Six petroleum terminals that supply fuel for the area remain down, including two in New York— one in Brooklyn, one in Long Island — according to the U.S. Department of Energy. There is no timetable for when the terminals will come back online, Sinclair said.

The scarcity has also led to higher prices: fuel has jumped 15 cents since the storm in the city even as prices have fallen nationwide.

“Demand goes up and the product gets scarcer, the price goes up,” Sinclair said.

New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman announced he is launching an investigation into potential price gouging at gas stations in the city.

Under New York state business law, merchants are prohibited from taking advantage of consumers during an “abnormal disruption of the market” by hiking prices to an “unconscionably excessive price.”

Many have been forced to ignore prices out of desperation to fill their tanks. “I need gas, so right now the price really doesn’t matter,” said Joseph Foreman, a Middle Village resident.

Sinclair expects the shortages to remain for at least another week, if not longer, as just 60 percent of gas stations are pumping in the city.

With the deficit remaining, Bloomberg announced on Tuesday, November 13 that the rationing will remain for at least five additional days.

Weekend Roundup


| brennison@queenscourier.com

The Afternoon Roundup

Target of e-mails sent from Petraeus’ mistress is State Dept. military liaison

The target of the vicious e-mails sent from former CIA director Gen. David Petraeus’ mistress Paula Broadwell is the State Department military liaison, according to an AP source. Meanwhile, Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., who leads the Senate Intelligence Committee and planned to have Petraeus testify this week on the Sept. 11 attack that killed the US ambassador in Libya and three other Americans, said she first learned of Petraeus’ affair from the media late last week and was dumbstruck when Petraeus confirmed the affair to her in a telephone call Friday. Read more: NY Post

Rockaways fire fighters work 24-hour shifts as blaze dangers amplify in aftermath of Hurricane Sandy

They call it The Beach House. And like so many other houses in the Rockaways, it was flooded during Sandy. It has no heat or hot water. Only a generator is keeping the lights on. Despite the hardships, its occupants have not fled for warmer, drier, safer quarters. That’s because The Beach House is the home of Ladder 137 and Engine 268, and its residents are city firefighters who know the Rockaways still face grave danger. Read more: Daily News

Queens man dies from injuries sustained in fall at dark apartment building as NYC’s Sandy death toll reaches 43

Police say a 77-year-old man who died from injuries sustained in a fall at his darkened apartment building has become the latest victim of Superstorm Sandy. That raises the city’s death toll related to the storm to 43. Authorities say Albert McSwain died Saturday. He was found Oct. 31 at the bottom of the steps of his building on Rockway Beach Boulevard. Read more: NY Post

A train service returns – partially – to Rockaways nearly 2 weeks after Hurricane Sandy

Transit service has been partially restored to the Sandy-ravaged Rockaways. On Sunday, the MTA extended A train service to Howard Beach and added a shuttle bus to the storm damaged peninsula, officials said. Full A service to the Rockaways isn’t expected to return for months as the bridge over Jamaica Bay was extensively damaged by the superstorm. Read more: Daily News

Queens gas-station owner spills on shortage and line lunacy

A Queens gas-station owner says the fuel shortage could be fixed instantly if panicky drivers calmed down and hoarders, profiteers and scammers were stopped. In the two weeks since Hurricane Sandy, he’s been cursed at, spit on and nearly punched in the face by motorists. Fearing reprisals from his supplier, he requested anonymity to relate his experiences from the front lines of the fuel lines to The Post’s Kathianne Boniello. Read more: NY Post

Public housing residents demand power as NYCHA promises rent credits

The New York City Housing Authority is providing rent adjustments in public housing complexes that were severely impacted by Sandy. The agency announced Sunday that for any days that the tenants were without essential services like electricity, heat, water or elevators, NYCHA officials will issue a rent credit on January rent bills. Read more: NY1

GAS PAINS: One reporter’s quest for petrol


| aaltman@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Maggie Hayes

Every time that little yellow light goes on, I panic.

“I need to find a gas station,” I think, completely overblown, imagining the dial suddenly dropping and leaving me stranded. I ran out of gas once, not long after getting my driver’s license. At 16, I reluctantly called my mom for help – utter defeat for a teenager — and waited as she brought me a can of fuel. That was never going to happen again.

The Sandy-fueled gas shortage did more than slow traffic – it slashed our tires. At the gas station where I used to get my coffee every morning before getting on the Grand Central Parkway, a fuming gas-getter pulled a gun on someone out of frustration. Thousands formerly behind the wheel turned to public transit, turning already overcrowded subways into cattle cars. The platform at Queensboro Plaza was unnavigable, filled with disheartened travelers who had waited for 35 minutes just to catch a No. 7 train. Gasbuddy.com ousted Facebook as our laptop’s most visited website. At a time when we should have come together, we fought over the last droplet of petrol.

For anyone who ever disagreed with the notion that our reliance on oil has exceeded healthy, here is the proof.

I wasted the last few drops of gas in my tank searching for more gas. Instead of my typical route home, I opted to take Northern Boulevard from Bayside to my apartment in Long Island City. Flushing — nothing. Corona — nothing. Elmhurst — nothing. Woodside — nothing. Every station with their lights shut off like the scene of a zombie movie right before they attack. The gaslight went on just as I crossed into Long Island City – my signal that it was time to abandon the hunt and I chortled home on fumes.

The week-late gas rationing plans instated on Friday morning, November 9 gave me hope that somehow, somewhere gas awaited. After a quick surveillance on foot, I discovered the station around the corner from my place was stocked. While the queue trailed five blocks long, I made the jump and put my gasless car in line, contemplating the strength it would take to push it to the station if it sputtered out.

The scene seemed post-apocalyptic. I imagined what it would be like if this were food instead of gas.

“People would be dead.”

The gurgle of a thirsty engine grew louder. A man banged on my car window, furious that he couldn’t park his van because of the traffic and became irate when I couldn’t move more than a few inches forward without smacking the car in front of me. In a city where patience runs notoriously thin, it was obvious that this was some kind of test to see if we really all were as un-altruistic as the rest of the world believed us to be. I think we lived up to our reputation.

Finally, with my car sucking down the last few gasps of fuel, I reached the pump. While the attendant capped everyone at a fair, sharing-is-caring $40, it was a relief to know that if there was an emergency, I could get where I needed to go. Since travelling to Breezy Point last week, my co-workers and I have wanted to return to take people who were hit hard by the storm some essentials. The lack of fuel precluded us from travelling where public transit is nonexistent. We’re looking forward to revisiting the area soon.

Gas rationing begins today in NYC


| brennison@queenscourier.com

File photo

More than a week into the gas shortage, Mayor Michael Bloomberg announced an emergency order rationing gas to begin Friday morning at 6.

Cars with license plates ending in odd numbers or a letter will be able to purchase gas on odd numbered days; vehicles with plates ending in even numbers can purchase on even numbered days.

Long Island and Westchester have also issued alternate day gas rations.

“This is designed to make sure everyone has a fair chance, that the lines aren’t too oppressive and that we can get through this,” the mayor said.

The announcement comes as Bloomberg said the shortage may continue until Thanksgiving.

Police officers will be at stations to enforce the order, Bloomberg said.  Violations are Class B misdemeanors, according to a release from the mayor’s office.

Driver’s frustrations have grown with the lines at gas stations.

“The gasoline shortages remain a real problem for drivers throughout our region,” Bloomberg said.

New Jersey Governor Chris Christie installed a similar rationing plan in the state nearly two weeks ago that significantly cut down on gas lines.

Emergency vehicles, buses, para-transit vehicles, commercial vehicles, taxis and cars with medical license plates are exempt from the order.

As of now, the order will remain in effect for five days.

 

AG Schneiderman investigates price gouging as gas shortage continues


| brennison@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Maggie Hayes

Drivers searching endlessly for a station to fill up now face a new problem — price gouging.

State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman announced an investigation into complaints of price gouging at gas stations, but also for emergency supplies like generators, hotels, food and water.

“Our office has zero tolerance for price gouging,” said Schneiderman. “We are actively investigating hundreds of complaints we’ve received from consumers of businesses preying on victims of Hurricane Sandy, and will do everything we can to stop unscrupulous individuals from taking advantage of New Yorkers trying to rebuild their lives.”

Gas remains scarce more than a week after Sandy left the area. The U.S. Energy Information Administration estimated that 38 percent of gas stations in the New York metropolitan area do not have fuel.

Prices at the pump in New York City are up 15 cents over the past week, according to AAA’s Fuel Gauge Report. Nationwide prices are dropped five cents over the last seven days.

Under New York state business law merchants are prohibited from taking advantage of consumers during an “”abnormal disruption of the market” by hiking prices to an “unconscionably excessive price.”

While “unconscionably excessive price” is not specifically defined, the attorney general’s office said a before and after analysis of prices can be used as evidence.

According to the New York Post, Schneiderman also issued a subpoena to Craig’s List demanding the web site identify users who are offering gas for more than $20 a gallon.

If residents would like to make a complaint regarding price gouging, they can call 800-771-7755 or click here.

Queens Morning Roundup


| brennison@queenscourier.com

Today’s Forecast

Thursday: Mostly cloudy, with a high near 48. Breezy, with a northwest wind 17 to 20 mph. Thursday night: Partly cloudy, with a low around 37. Northwest wind 11 to 16 mph.

Event of the Day: Bruce Lee Fights Back From the Grave

Devil Science Theater 3000 is an interactive event where the audience plays drinking games and makes fun of terrible movies while being egged on by professional comedians in the crowd. Find our more or view more events

Ex-St. John’s University dean Cecilia Chang rejected sweet plea deal before suicide

In the end, disgraced St. John’s University dean Cecilia Chang chose death over a life of dishonor — even at one point rejecting a sweet plea deal of two to six years in a so-called Club Fed prison, the Daily News has learned. Read more: Daily News

Gov. Cuomo fires Emergency Management chief over Sandy tree removal: sources

Office of Emergency Management boss Steven Kuhr was fired after allegedly sending workers to clear a tree in his Long Island driveway as other victims of the storm suffered, sources said yesterday. Read more: NY Post

Nor’easter brings snow, surges to storm-shocked city

A nor’easter brought heavy wind gusts and a snow Wednesday to a city trying to recover from last week’s superstorm, and coastal communities in the five boroughs were forced to endure another round of storm surges. Read more: NY1

Councilman James Sanders rips LIPA over Rockaway power outage

As tensions mount on a powerless Rockaway peninsula, the barbs being tossed at the Long Island Power Authority are becoming harsher with each passing day. City Councilman and soon-to-be state Sen. James Sanders Jr. blasted the utility on Wednesday and its top executive Michael Hervey after Sanders was told many of LIPA’s customers in Queens could be without power for up to three more weeks. Read more: Daily News

New York AG goes after post-Sandy price gougers

The state attorney general yesterday slapped a subpoena on Craigslist, demanding that the popular Web site identify sellers who jacked up prices on post-Sandy gas, generators and other supplies, The Post has learned. Read more: NY Post

Ex-con who shot Nassau County cop and motorist dead should be thrown in prison for the rest of his life: prosecutors

The Queens ex-con who gunned down a Nassau County cop and a motorist near Belmont Park to avoid returning to prison should spend the rest of his life behind bars, prosecutors said Wednesday as the alleged triggerman was indicated for murder, robbery and weapons possession. Read more: Daily News

Queens Morning Roundup


| brennison@queenscourier.com

Today’s Weather

Friday: Sunny, with a high near 54. Northwest wind 13 to 16 mph. Friday night: Partly cloudy, with a low around 43. Northwest wind 7 to 10 mph.

Event of the Day: William Shakespeare’s “The Winter’s Tale”

E Phoenix Idealis Theater, Inc. delivers this classic story for a modern audience. Directed by Rachel Alt and Ben Fabrizi, it opens November 9 for a limited run at the Poppenhusen Institute in College Point. Find our more or view more events

Gas rationing begins today in NYC

More than a week into the gas shortage, Mayor Michael Bloomberg announced an emergency order rationing gas to begin Friday morning at 6. Cars with license plates ending in odd numbers or a letter will be able to purchase gas on odd numbered days; vehicles with plates ending in even numbers can purchase on even numbered days. Read more: Queens Courier

Housing Authority scrambling to restore power to 11 developments in Queens and Brooklyn by this weekend

The Housing Authority is scrambling to restore power by this weekend to 11 developments in Queens and Brooklyn that went dark more than a week ago. It doesn’t look promising. NYCHA Chairman John Rhea on Wednesday said he hoped to accomplish this, but a day later Mayor Bloomberg was saying, “I’m not sure we can make it.” Read more: Daily News

Residents displaced by Sandy are staring at life in Staten Island ‘jail’

The state is eyeing the recently shuttered Arthur Kill Correctional Facility on Staten Island as a temporary home for people displaced by the ravages of Sandy and this week’s nasty nor’easter, officials said yesterday. Closed last December, the medium-security prison could feed and sleep as many as 900 people with nowhere else to go. Read more: NY Post

Students in displaced schools can now attend nearest school they can get to

On Thursday, for the first time since Oct. 26, every New York City public school was open. But nearly 200,000 students were still out, like a Coney Island third grader whose school building was damaged and relocated miles away in Bensonhurst. His elderly grandmother couldn’t get him to the new site. Read more: NY1

Personal items battered by Sandy litter temp landfill in Jacob Riis Park

Baby toys, photo albums, broken china—these are just some precious items that can be found in fast rising heaps of waste at a temporary landfill in Jacob Riis Park. Debris from storm battered Far Rockaway has been piling up at the park’s parking lot –by thousands of tons a day—thanks to sanitation workers who have been clearing thrash and sand-clogged streets. Read more: NY Post

Iran fires at U.S. drone over Persian Gulf, but misses: Pentagon

Iranian attack aircraft fired multiple rounds at an unarmed U.S. drone in international airspace over the Persian Gulf last week, the Pentagon revealed Thursday. The rounds missed. But the incident — the first known attempt by Iranian warplanes to take out a U.S. drone — added intrigue to the extremely tense relationship between between America and Iran. Read more: Daily News

Pols propose bill requiring gas stations to have generators


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Following long gas lines and even fights that, according to the NYPD, resulted in 41 arrests since Sandy struck last week, two New York politicians are introducing a state bill that would require all gas stations to have generators in case of power outages.

The legislation, which will be introduced by Assemblymember David Weprin in the Assembly, is modeled on a 2007 bill passed in Florida that makes it mandatory for gas stations and wholesalers to have a generator that’s able to supply at least 72 hours of power and be available to use no later than 24 hours after a disaster like Sandy hits again, said Weprin’s office. State Senator David Carlucci will introduce the bill in the State Senate.

“It just makes common sense to be pro-active and prepared for these increasingly destructive storms,” said Weprin. “It isn’t good for anyone to be unprepared, but especially our gas stations because of our reliance on gasoline. We all need to be able to function as quickly as possible after a storm strikes. This is very serious.”

Queens’ Morning Roundup


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

TODAY’S FORECAST

Tuesday: Partly cloudy in the morning, then clear. High of 46. Winds from the NE at 5 to 10 mph. Tuesday night: Partly cloudy in the evening, then overcast. Low of 41. Winds from the NE at 10 to 15 mph. Chance of rain 30%.

QUEENS COURIER 2012 ELECTION DAY COVERAGE

Throughout the day and night Queens Courier will be updating our website, Facebook page and Twitter account (@QueensCourier) using the hastag #courierpolitics, with news and photos on the local elections and presidential race, from the casting of ballots to the final results.

If you have yet to head to the polls or even make up your mind about whom to vote for, check out our Queens Election Guide.

Voters who have been displaced by Sandy and can’t vote at their regular poll site, can find out if their voting place has been relocated here or, as Governor Cuomo announced last night, can cast an affidavit ballot at any poll site in New York State.

 Storm to hit Sandy-stricken Northeast

As the Northeast still recovers from Sandy, another storm is poised to strike the area later this week. Read more: Queens Courier

Families search for loved ones in the wake of Sandy

A Broad Channel man battled a broken boardwalk last week in search of his 65-year-old father, who refused to abandon his Rockaway beachfront home. Read more: Queens Courier

Hurricane Sandy could decide fate of New York State Senate

The future of the New York State Senate could be decided in the flood-soaked, fire-scarred parts of Queens that were hardest hit by superstorm Sandy. Read more: New York Daily News

Schools reopen to snarls; transit headaches persist

In Lower Manhattan, students shivered in school buildings that had lights, but no heat; on Staten Island, they sat by classmates whose homes had been destroyed; and in every borough, some students stayed home as the city used their classrooms, hallways and gymnasiums as shelters. Read more: New York Times

Cabbies demand express lane for fueling up, complain of long daily waits

On Monday night, New York City cabbies were demanding an express lane at local gas stations, as they complained of waiting up to six hours a day to refuel. Read more: CBS New York

In case of a recount, a long wait for Ohio

Election Day in Ohio is Tuesday, as in every other state in the union. But if the margin in the presidential contest is narrow here, as many polls predict, the winner may not be known until well into December. Read more: New York Times

New Congress likely to frustrate Obama or Romney

No matter who is elected president, he’s likely to find that the next Congress will remain what the current one has been for President Barack Obama – a headache. Read more: AP

Congressional races set records for spending

There may be little drama left in the outcome, but you wouldn’t know that by watching the final days of campaigning in the battle for the U.S. House. Read more: CNN

 

In need of gas, drivers turn online to find fuel


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

gas sites

Desperate to find fuel following Sandy, drivers are turning to online sources, such as Twitter, Craigslist and other websites to get gas.

Driving around or travelling far distances aren’t an option as a car’s gas gauge moves closer to empty, so to better pinpoint where to go to fill up, people are crowdsourcing, Reuters reported.

Popular hashtags to find gas on Twitter include #njgas, #nygas, #nycgas and #brooklyngas, and handles, such as @njgas  and @GasBuddy, according to Reuters.

In addition to being on Twitter, Gas Buddy, a website to find local gas prices, has a special Sandy fuel shortage tracker, where you can search for stations and help others by reporting station information. Gas Buddy also has a smartphone app.

Those that are even more desperate for gas can check out Craigslist.

Though people have been selling and trading items on the website for years, since the fuel shortage, some are hocking gas at up to $30 a gallon, according to the Huffington Post, and those prices could go up the longer the shortage continues.

How are you finding places to fill up your gas during the Sandy fuel shortage?