Tag Archives: G train

G train service suspended in Queens for five weeks


| editorial@queenscourier.com

File photo

For five consecutive weeks this summer, the G train will be not run between the Court Square station in Long Island City and the Nassau Avenue stop in Brooklyn due to Hurricane Sandy recovery work, according to the MTA.

The repairs will be made from Friday, July 25 at 10:30 p.m. until Tuesday, September 2 at 5 a.m.

As an alternative, the MTA will provide shuttle buses between the stops, which will run along two routes:

1. Via Manhattan Av to/from Nassau Av G station

2. Via McGuinness Blvd to/from Lorimer St/Metropolitan Av L station

Shuttle bus stops along each route will be located near G stations at:

Southbound

Jackson Av and 45 Av

Jackson Av and 47 Av

Manhattan Av/McGuinness Blvd and Greenpoint Av

Manhattan Av/McGuinness Blvd and Nassau Av

Metropolitan Av and Union Av

Northbound

Metropolitan Av and Union Av

Manhattan Av/McGuinness Blvd and Nassau Av

Manhattan Av/McGuinness Blvd and Greenpoint Av

44 Drive and 23 St

 Map courtesy of MTA

 

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MTA increases G train service


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

File photo

G train riders can expect an easier commute starting Monday after local lawmakers and transit advocates pushed for better service.

The MTA is boosting weekday service on the subway line, which connects Queens to Brooklyn, between 3 and 9 p.m. Trains will now operate every 8 minutes instead of every 10 minutes.

“This added service will address increased ridership and demand along a growing corridor between Brooklyn and Queens,” the transit agency said.

The MTA is also adding public announcement systems to 12 G train stations that currently do not have them, according to an agency spokesman.

The G train changes are the result of the MTA’s full-line review of the subway line that was requested by state Senators Daniel Squadron and Martin Malavé Dilan.

“Today the G rarely means the beginning of a great ride,” Squadron said. “These improvements will help commutes on this important line—and hopefully make lives a little easier for the riders who depend on it.”

Other G train changes expected as a result of the review include stopping the four-car train at the same place on the platform at all times, marking where on the platform the train will stop with clear signage and running morning trains at more evenly spaced intervals, according to the Riders Alliance, a grassroots organization of subway and bus riders, which made recommendations that were incorporated into the review.

John Blesso, a Riders Alliance member who lives off of the Broadway G train stop, said the implementations are “a solid first step by the MTA and hopefully many more will follow.”

“The G train is increasingly becoming a major artery for Brooklyn and Queens residents, and we need to make sure that service keeps up with ridership on the line.”

 

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LIC community voices outrage against upcoming No. 7 train suspensions


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/ Photo by Angy Altamirano

Long Island City residents and business owners are telling the MTA enough is enough.

The No. 7 train will soon be going through another round of suspensions causing it to not run in parts of western Queens and Manhattan for more than a dozen weekends this year, starting in the end of February, according to a notice from the MTA.

This news again upset residents, business owners and local politicians who gathered in front of the Vernon Boulevard-Jackson Avenue subway station on Friday to tell the MTA they are fed up with the constant disruptions and the lack of notice.

“Real people’s lives are affected in real ways here, this is not a game,” said Councilmember Jimmy Van Bramer. “This is about human beings, they’re trying to survive and the MTA is trying to kill us. We’ve got to stop this now.”

From February through July, there will be 13 weekend suspensions. Those dates are finalized, the transit agency said. There are nine tentative weekend shutdowns scheduled for August through November.

Business owners are tired of potential financial losses, residents are sick of longer commutes and local politicians just want the MTA to finally listen to their ideas and communicate with the neighborhood.

“It outrageous and all we are asking for is the opportunity to be heard, to present some common sense ideas that we have presented to them year after year after year,” said Senator Michael Gianaris, who has suggested the MTA offer a shuttle bus from Vernon Boulevard through the Queens Midtown Tunnel into the city. “The MTA needs to listen to us once and for all.”

Rebecca Trent, LIC resident and owner of The Creek and The Cave on Jackson Avenue, said the area has grown by 500 percent and the suspension will only make business owners’ jobs harder.

“I don’t know how I’m going to survive this, I do not know and neither do many of my neighbors,” Trent said holding back tears. “What they are trying to do to this neighborhood is disgusting, we deserve better, enough is enough.”

Along with the shuttle service through the Midtown tunnel, Trent also said that in order to compensate the Long Island City community for the “irresponsible shutdowns,” the MTA should give local businesses, who will suffer, free ad space at the E and G subway stations and on the trains.

Richard Mazda, artistic director for The Secret Theatre, said he has had to put up with the disruptions to his business every single year and has faced problems during the annual LIC Arts Open festival, with artists and friends not being able to attend.

“You must have known that you were going to do this work, you have stage managed the release of this information so that we couldn’t fight you, but we will,” Mazda said to the MTA. “This is like the worst movie you have ever seen.”

The latest round of work, including continued installation of Communications-Based Train Control (CBTC), replacement of critical track panels and reconstruction inside the Steinway Tube under the East River, is expected to modernize, improve a fortify the Flushing No. 7 line, according to the MTA. The work will also include tunnel duct reconstruction and replacement and improvements on components damaged during Superstorm Sandy.

“We understand that these service disruptions are inconvenient to the customers who depend on the No. 7 train and we appreciate their patience,” said MTA NYC Transit President Carmen Bianco. “We have made every effort to schedule these project simultaneously to get as much work done as we can during these periods.”

 

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MTA to shut down G, R trains for Sandy-related repairs


| editorial@queenscourier.com

MTA/Photo by Marc A. Hermann

BY DENISE ROMANO AND MELISA STUMPF

Riders of the R and G line are in for a stressful summer, with major construction slated for the Montague and Greenpoint tubes that were badly damaged during Sandy.

Beginning on July 6, the Greenpoint tube, which runs under Newtown Creek between Brooklyn and Queens, will be closed for 12, 53-hour-long weekends. The closures are slated to start at midnight on Fridays during the following days: July 6-7, 13-14, 20-21; August 3-4, 10-11, 17-18, 24-25; September 7-8, 28-29; October 5-6; December 7-8, and 14-15.  There will also be a five-week 24/7 closure of the tube in summer, 2014.

The three northernmost stops: Greenpoint Avenue, 21st Street and Court Square will be closed. G trains will run between Church Avenue and Nassau Avenue, and a shuttle bus will be provided to link the closed stops.

As for the Montague Tube, which runs beneath the East River between Brooklyn and Manhattan, it will be closed for up to 14 months starting the first week in August. On weekdays, the R will run in two sections: between Court Street and 95th Street in Brooklyn and from Forest Hills-71st Street in Queens to Whitehall Street in Manhattan.

On weekends, the R train will be re-routed over the Manhattan Bridge, skipping Jay, Court, Whitehall and Rector Streets and City Hall. Overnights, the N will also run over the bridge.

The extensive repairs are due to the million gallons of salt water that flooded the tunnels during Sandy. The water corroded, degraded or ruined “almost everything” including tracks, switches, signals, controls, and power and communication cables. The tubes were temporarily fixed, but not permanently repaired.

In the Greenpoint Tube, power cables were immersed in salt water and are now corroding from the inside. The controls for the ventilation, lighting and communication systems were also destroyed and were never restored to pre-Sandy conditions.

An MTA spokesperson said that the Montague Tune is in “far worse” condition. The concrete and terracotta duct banks under the walkways along the sides of the tunnel, built in 1920, were compromised, leaving cables unprotected. The duct banks must be removed and rebuilt, so they can be available as emergency exits.

 

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G train to undergo full review by MTA


| hchin@homereporternews.com

Photo courtesy of the Office of State Senator Michael Gianaris

G train riders are one step closer to getting changes and improvements enacted on their subway line.

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) has agreed to “undertake a Full Line Review of the G train” and the review will be completed by the end of June 2013,” the transit agency announced on Friday, February 22. Residents and politicians signed a petition and rallied in January to pressure the MTA to begin addressing ongoing problems on the train line.

“I am pleased our efforts to push the MTA to improve G train service prompted the agency into action, resulting in today’s announcement of a full-line review to be completed by this June,” said State Senator Michael Gianaris, who has pushed for the MTA’s review along with State Senator Daniel Squadron and several area officials. “The G train is a lifeline for New Yorkers traveling between Queens and Brooklyn, and  I am hopeful the MTA will expeditiously implement much needed improvements so this line can better serve our commuters.”

 

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Pols call for review of ‘G’ train performance


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of the Office of State Senator Michael Gianaris

An important transit option for Queens and Brooklyn, local politicians are calling for the MTA to review the “G” line and its numerous service issues.

The train, which travels from Long Island City to Kensington, Brooklyn, and is the only subway line that doesn’t go through Manhattan, was extended recently to Church Avenue.

But that change didn’t remedy other issues, such as frequency of trains, communication with riders about service changes and disruptions, and the lack of free out-of system transfers.

These complaints were highlighted in a recent petition campaign by the Riders Alliance, and in a letter to the MTA’s interim president, Thomas Prendergast.

Sent by State Senators Daniel Squadron and Martin Malavé Dilan, the letter asked for a full performance review of the “G” line, as the MTA did with the “F” and “L” trains.

The request is also supported by over a dozen other politicians and transit advocates.

“Constant service disruptions, a lack of service change notifications and increased commuter expenses due to limited free transfers make clear that the MTA treats the G train like the ugly duckling of the MTA system,” said State Senator Michael Gianaris, who attended the Rally For a Better G Train held in Williamsburg yesterday. “It should provide commuters with direct, convenient access between Queens and Brooklyn, rather than forcing travel through Manhattan to get from one borough to the other.”

“The G Train is critical to residents and businesses throughout Brooklyn and a key connection for the growing number of workers commuting between Brooklyn and Queens. Everything possible should be done to ensure this important subway line keeps pace with the thriving communities it serves,” said Paul Steely White, executive director of Transportation Alternatives.

 

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Queens’ Morning Roundup


| lguerre@queenscourier.com


EVENT of the DAY: Daughtry concert at Citi Field 

Multi-platinum rock band Daughtry is going to play a concert after the Mets-Dodgers game at Citi Field. Ticket prices start at $28, which includes admission to the game and the post-game concert. They are available on www.mets.com/daughtry or via phone at 718-507-TIXX (8499).

[Click here for more info or submit your events]

USTA’s parking garage proposal a double fault, local leaders say

Not every aspect of the U.S. Tennis Association’s proposed expansion in Queens is an ace right down the middle in the court of public opinion. Advocates are yelling “fault” at the proposal to build two parking garages in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, saying they have no place in the greenspace. The garages are included in the $500 million expansion plan for the Billie Jean King National Tennis Center announced last month. Read more: [New York Daily News] 

MTA to improve bus service in all five boroughs, keep G train extension 

The MTA delivered good news Thursday as Chairman Joseph Lhota announced plans to add $29 million in bus, subway and commuter rail improvements, two years after major cutbacks. He says it’s doable because it’s a small percent of the MTA’s budget and business has improved. Read more: [NY1]

End ‘turnstile justice,’ pol fumes 

Strike three — you’re in! City Council Public Safety Committee Chairman Peter Vallone (pictured) yesterday again called on Albany to pass the “Three Strikes, You’re In” bill, mandating prison time for anyone convicted of three misdemeanors within 10 years. The Queens Democrat renewed his call after alleged PATH-train groper Gian Verdelli, 61, of Brooklyn, was nabbed Monday in New Jersey and it turned out his record included an eye-popping 168 arrests since the 1970s, mostly for misdemeanors. Read more: [New York Post] 

Eggs snatched from protected piping plover nests in Rockaway 

Federal parks police are trying to hunt down the person who snatched eggs from two piping plover nests in Breezy Point earlier this month. The tiny, plump birds are endangered and enjoy federally protected habitats along the Rockaway peninsula. Officials think the eggs — which were discovered missing the morning of July 4 — may have been stolen by a collector. Read more: [New York Daily News]