Tag Archives: Fresh Meadows

Star of Queens: Yolanda Delacruz Gallagher, 25th District Leader and community activist


| editorial@queenscourier.com

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BY ADJANI SHAH

Community Involvement: Yolanda Delacruz Gallagher is the 25th District Leader in Queens. She has also been a board member on the Fresh Meadows Homeowners Civic Association for over 15 years and a member of the Holy Family Parish Church. As an active community member, Gallagher tackles issues such as graffiti, broken street lights, storm damage and helps schools by giving students incentives to achieve their academic best.

Background: Gallagher is originally from the Philippines. She came to New York in 1991. She graduated from DeSales University with an MBA in business administration and used to work as a banker. She’s been married to James Gallagher for 18 years. They are both active members in the Fresh Meadows community.

Inspiration: Gallagher said her inspiration is her husband. He introduced her to community involvement. They both roam the community to see what could be fixed or improved. “It comes from the heart,” she said. “It comes from loving the community.”

Biggest Challenge: Gallagher said her biggest challenge is trying to please everyone and reaching goals without affecting the politics of the situation.

Star of Queens: Catherine Donohoe, president of the board of directors, Bridge to Life


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COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT: Catherine Donohoe is president of the board of directors of Bridge to Life, an organization that works to provide parents with food, clothes and other items necessary for raising a child. The organization, Donohoe says, has only one part-time employee, an accountant. The board is made up entirely of volunteers. “We have doctors, lawyers and accountants on our board,” she said. “They all come from different religions.”

In addition to providing supplies, Bridge to Life also provides services for those who might be pregnant. “We have free pregnancy tests, we provide sonograms,” she said.

The organization was started in 1992 with one location on Bell Boulevard. Today, the organization has two locations with one in Flushing and the other in Astoria. Bridge also has a 24-hour hotline.

BACKGROUND: Donohoe is a lifetime resident of Queens. She works as a professor at Nassau Community College and is a parishioner at Holy Family R.C. Church in Fresh Meadows.

FAVORITE MEMORY: Donohoe told the story of a volunteer from Holy Cross High School who came to volunteer at Bridge to Life. The student asked his mom where he should volunteer to fulfill his service hours for school and she had chosen Bridge to Life herself and recommended it. Both mother and son were recently honored at the organization’s annual dinner dance.

INSPIRATION: When Eleanor Ruder, the founder of Bridge to Life, came to speak at Donohoe’s parish, she said she was inspired to start the work that Bridge does today.  But Donohoe said her inspiration continues beyond that single event. “You get inspiration when you continue to do the work day after day,” she said.

BIGGEST CHALLENGE: Donohoe says her biggest challenge is the current “culture” that she sees through the experiences of her daughter who is currently in college.

 

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Three Queens Burger King joints now delivering


| mchan@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Melissa Chan

Burger buffs in the borough, here’s a whopper of good news: Three Burger King joints in Queens are now delivering.

The global fast food chain announced it would debut its home delivery services in New York City last November. Now locations in Fresh Meadows, Ozone Park and Jamaica — and four in Brooklyn — are ready to roll out the goods.

“We are thrilled to expand the BK Delivers test program and offer its convenience to our New York guests in the city that never sleeps,” said Alex Macedo, senior vice president and general manager of U.S. franchise business for Burger King Worldwide.

Fast “foodies” who live within 10 minutes of participating stores can place orders online at www.bkdelivers.com or call 1-855-ORDER-BK from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily.

Franchises in Queens include 164-17 Union Turnpike, 92-02 Atlantic Avenue and 131-10 Hillside Avenue.

There is a $10 minimum and $2 delivery charge. Breakfast items, coffee, fountain drinks, shakes and soft serve ice-cream are excluded.

Innovative thermal technology packaging is guaranteed to seal in freshness, officials said. At least six more restaurants in Manhattan and Brooklyn are expected to offer delivery by the end of the year.

 

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Queens rabbi one of 10 women detained at Western Wall for wearing prayer shawl


| mchan@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Melissa Chan

She did not cross the Atlantic to make a stand.

Robyn Fryer Bodzin, a female rabbi from Fresh Meadows, said she came to the Old City of Jerusalem simply to exercise her rights to pray.

But on Monday, February 11, her peaceful worship abruptly ended when Israeli police detained her and nine other women at the Western Wall for wearing prayer shawls traditionally used by men.

“It’s archaic. It’s intolerant of a holistic society,” said Fryer Bodzin, 38.

An Israeli officer took her passport and told her she was not allowed to wear the shawl, called a tallit, at the sacred site. He said she violated regulations of the Torah and of holy places and “behaved in a way that may violate public safety.”

“There are some people in the world who don’t think women should be wearing this — that it’s male garb,” she said. “I was exercising my rights as a Jewish woman to pray, and when I pray, I wear a tallit. I’m still not sure why we were detained.”

Israeli police said the women were not charged with criminal offenses but were forbidden from the Wall for 15 days, according to reports.

Fryer Bodzin, who leads the Israel Center of Conservative Judaism (ICCJ), became the first female to head a conservative synagogue in Queens in 2009.

The self-described “hip, modern, vegan rabbi” said her indirect demonstration has not received backlash from the Jewish community, but rather applause.

“Robyn has always spoken for equality and tolerance. We’re proud of that. It’s something that we as a congregation wholeheartedly support,” said Sam Weiss, executive vice president of the ICCJ.

Weiss said Fryer Bodzin has used her wits and voice many times to fight for a variety of causes, including women and gay rights.

“She’s very young, very smart, and very lively,” he said. “We wouldn’t have picked her to lead us if she was any other person.”

Fryer Bodzin’s husband, Aaron, said he was proud of his wife for not taking off the prayer shawl.

“She is standing up for something that is important,” he said. “She has a good heart. She wasn’t going with any intent to cause any trouble.”

He called the breach in peace at the Wall “bitter irony.”

“One day down the road, we’re going to be able to look back and say, ‘Wasn’t it silly there was a time when women in Israel weren’t allowed to pray freely?’ One day, we’ll be able to say that was a silly time in our history.”

 

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Queens faithful celebrate Ash Wednesday


| editorial@queenscourier.com

BY ANTHONY O’REILLY

In a time when the Roman Catholic church has been thrust into the national spotlight following Pope Benedict XVI’s resignation, local parishioners gathered for the somber celebration of Ash Wednesday— the beginning of the holy season known as Lent.

The 3 p.m. service at Holy Family R.C. Church in Fresh Meadows was packed with faithful of all ages. Despite the fact the day is not a holy day of obligation, Father Casper Furnari couldn’t help but notice the church on this day, and in years past, has been more full than a regular Sunday service.

“Every Lent is a season of renewal and rededication,” he said.

Catholics traditionally attend Ash Wednesday services to have ashes in the form of a cross applied to their forehead. While it is being applied, the priest utters the phrase “Remember that you are dust, and to dust you shall return.”

During Lent, Catholics traditionally sacrifice a material good for the 40 days of the season.

Parishioner Theresa Sheehan said she would be giving up chocolate. Sheehan’s sacrifice, she said, reminds her of how fortunate she is in life.

“It makes me think I am fortunate enough to have all this stuff,” she said. “It makes me appreciate my life more on a daily basis.”

Joseph Healy said instead of giving up something for Lent, he would look to do something positive.

“Doing something positive for someone else, I think, is better than giving something else up,” he said, summarizing the season of Lent as a time to do good deeds. Healy said he hadn’t even thought of a sacrifice until that morning.

Furnari said this Lent would be historical considering the pope’s “shocking” announcement on Monday.

“Pope Benedict celebrated Ash Wednesday but toward the end of Lent we’ll have a new pope, whoever that might be, celebrating mass,” he said.

“It takes humility and courage to make that decision.”

 

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Flushing millionaire making bid for City Council seat


| mchan@queenscourier.com

Photo Courtesy of Isaac Sasson

A lottery millionaire from Flushing has thrown his hat in the ring to fill a vacant City Council seat in northeast Queens.

Isaac Sasson, 72, said he is running to replace outgoing Councilmember James Gennaro in the 24th District, which stretches from Fresh Meadows to Jamaica.

“I’ve been involved in the community for quite some time now. I’d like to do more. I feel very strongly about serving the people,” said Sasson, a former organic chemistry professor at Queens College and retired cancer researcher.

Sasson, who was born in Syria and raised in Lebanon, is no stranger to running for public office. The Democratic hopeful ran unsuccessfully for State Senate in 2010 and City Council in the 20th District in 2009.

His scientific background, he said, sets him apart from the pack of contenders who have already declared their intent to run, including lawyer Martha Taylor, 72, from Jamaica Estates, and attorney and former Assemblymember Rory Lancman from Fresh Meadows.

“I’m not the typical politician with a lawyer background,” Sasson said. “I’m a person with integrity.”
Since winning a $13 million lottery jackpot in 2007, Sasson said he has doled out nearly $250,000 to civic organizations, temples, churches, veterans and ethnic societies in Queens. An army veteran, he is president of the Holly Civic Association.

The philanthropist may have to dig deep into his pockets to match Lancman, who has already raked in $85,339 in campaign contributions during a six-month period, according to the city’s Campaign Finance Board (CFB).

Lancman collected funds from 29 unions, his camp said, including the United Federation of Teachers, Hotel Trades Council, UFCW Local 1500 and Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association – groups that did not back him during his recent failed bid for Congress.

Taylor, the Democratic district leader in the 24th Assembly District, has filed $55,310, according to the CFB.
Andrea Veras of Briarwood is also reportedly running for the seat. She could not be reached in time for comment. Filing reports for her and Sasson were unavailable as of press time.

Brinckerhoff Cemetery granted landmark status by City Council


| mchan@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of the Landmarks Preservation Commission

The landmark status of a historic Colonial-era burial ground in Fresh Meadows has been approved by the City Council.

The council voted overwhelmingly to accept Brinckerhoff Cemetery’s landmark designation on December 10 after the 18th century site was approved for official landmark status by the city’s Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) in August.

“With the landmarking of the Brinckerhoff cemetery, an irreplaceable part of Queens’ history will be preserved in perpetuity,” said Councilmember James Gennaro. “The countless hours that I and many others dedicated to this landmarking have been a wonderful investment that will yield historic and educational dividends for the people of Queens for generations to come.”

Local leaders and preservationists in the neighborhood fought through endless legal wrangling for more than a decade to save the 182nd Street site, Gennaro said.

The vote preserves and protects the final resting place for roughly 80 of the borough’s earliest and most prominent settlers from development.

“Queens is rich with historical treasures dating back to the Dutch era, from the Flushing Remonstrance and the Bowne House to Brinckerhoff Cemetery,” said Councilmember Dan Halloran. “It’s important to preserve the historical legacy of the borough.”

The next step, Gennaro said, is to find a nonprofit group capable of purchasing and maintaining the property.

According to the LPC, 13 cemeteries in the city have been designated as landmarks, including seven in Queens.

Queens residents among those busted in prostitution, money laundering ring


| mchan@queenscourier.com

Eleven Queens residents were indicted — and two human trafficking victims in Manhattan were saved — after authorities busted a $7 million prostitution-based money laundering ring that spanned the tri-state area, the attorney general said.

A 16-month joint agency investigation led to the 180-count indictment of advertising corporation Somad Enterprises, Inc. and 19 individuals, who allegedly engaged in enterprise corruption and a variety of crimes, including money laundering, falsifying business records, narcotics sales and prostitution, the attorney general said.

“This investigation led to the arrests of multiple individuals who were part of a criminal enterprise that made millions of dollars by profiting off the exploitation of women,” Attorney General Eric Schneiderman said. “The message we are sending is clear. These crimes will not be tolerated in the state of New York.”

Manhattan-based Somad Enterprises is accused of being a front for the large prostitution and narcotics distribution ring, according to the Attorney General’s Organized Crime Task Force and the NYPD.

The company, which authorities say allegedly posed as a legitimate business, “profited handsomely” in excess of $3 million by working with prostitution businesses to promote sex services through online, print and cable television sources.

Three “johns,” including a former guidance counselor and dean at Scarsdale High School, have already been arrested, the attorney general said.

Five of the 11 arrested Queens individuals — who each face up to 25 years in prison if convicted — hail from Flushing, authorities said. The others are from Forest Hills, Bayside, Whitestone, Oakland Gardens, Fresh Meadows and Jamaica.

The two trafficking victims have been brought to a safe haven, said the attorney general.

Calls to Somad Enterprises went unreturned as of press time.

 

Lancman to vie for Gennaro’s City Council seat


| mchan@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/File photo

A state lawmaker is looking to take his legislative know-how to City Hall.

Assemblymember Rory Lancman officially announced his candidacy for City Council on Monday, November 19. The Democratic hopeful will seek to head the 24th Council District, which currently stretches from Fresh Meadows to Jamaica and is led by outgoing Councilmember James Gennaro.

“The city faces tremendous challenges in terms of the economy, the education system,” said Lancman, 43. “There’s going to be a real need for people who have legislative experience and the energy to try to tackle these issues head on, so I’m throwing my hat in the ring.”

Lancman, who decided not to seek re-election after serving the assembly for six years, had been on the fence about making a run to join the city’s lawmaking body since his failed congressional bid back in June.

But the “tremendous turnover in city government” next year — including the mayor and half of the City Council — made the decision easier, Lancman said.

“It’s going to be a very, very exciting time for the city, where the slate of government is going to be wiped clean,” he said.

Lancman said shaping city policy outweighed other options he considered for the “next chapter” of his life, which included going back to being a full-time lawyer or working in the nonprofit world.

“I really thought about what I really wanted to do in the next chapter of my life, what would give me satisfaction,” he said. “What really excites me about getting up every morning is being in public service. That is the most exciting thing for me.”

The lure of the open seat has already drawn in Martha Taylor, 72, who has declared her candidacy in the race to replace Gennaro. The lawyer from Jamaica Estates is also the Democratic District Leader in the 24th Assembly District, president of the Jamaica Estates Association and vice chair of Community Board 8.

City Council elections take place next November. A primary date has not yet been set.

Queens men die in Long Island plane crash


| mchan@queenscourier.com

Two Queens men were killed after a plane they were flying in crashed in a Long Island inlet last weekend, authorities said.

Cyril Mclavin, 51, of Fresh Meadows, and Andrew Messana, 72, of Bayside, have been identified as the two victims whose lives were claimed on October 20 at 3:06 p.m. when a small plane the pair was in went down in Moriches Inlet, cops said.

The aircraft was pulled from the water, and the two bodies were recovered from the cockpit of the plane, police said. They were taken to the Suffolk County Medical Examiner’s Office for autopsies.

The total number of occupants on the plane has not yet been determined, according to authorities, and an investigation into what caused the crash is under investigation.

Witnesses on the beach and on a nearby boat, who heard the plane’s engine sputtering, watched as the craft fell from the sky, police said. They attempted to keep the plane above water by tying a rope to the plane, but cops said the aircraft eventually sank approximately 30 feet below.

The families of both victims were unreachable as of press time.

 

Bud’s Ale House replaces Hooters in Fresh Meadows


| mchan@queenscourier.com

File photo

Fresh Meadows residents are saying ta-ta to their neighborhood rack shack after the establishment known for its busty wait staff bounced out of town last week.

Hooters emptied its 61-09 190th Street nest on Sunday, October 14, and reopened as a new brand, Bud’s Ale House. According to officials, failed year-long negotiations led corporate heads at Hooters of America to ax a franchise agreement with Strix Restaurant Group, which runs the Fresh Meadows corner eatery and three others on Long Island.

“Overall, the Hooters brand just wasn’t selling,” said Strix spokesperson Ed McCabe. “We think we have a better brand, and we didn’t find a willing cooperative partner in Hooters, who just wanted to take money and didn’t want to advertise.”

Bud’s Ale House boasts food options and drink specials similar to its predecessor, but the new food joint will feature less skin and more male staffers, said McCabe, who is hoping for a 50/50 women to men employee ratio.

“We’re not in the business of what Hooters is,” McCabe said, referring to the chain’s well-known majority female wait staff, uniformed in tight tops and skimpy shorts. “Eighty percent of people will not go into Hooters to begin with. It’s a stale brand.”

All Hooters employees were transferred over after the move and none were laid off, McCabe said. Management is currently accepting male applicants as food servers.

The Hooters in Farmingdale also transformed into Bud’s Ale House last week, while an Islandia location was rebranded to “58’s” and one in East Meadow was closed completely.

There is another Bud’s Ale House in Astoria, which opened this September, McCabe said.

Queens’ Morning Roundup


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

TODAY’S FORECAST

Monday: Clear. High of 66. Winds from the NW at 10 to 15 mph. Monday night: Partly cloudy. Low of 57. Winds from the WNW at 5 to 10 mph. Chance of rain 20%.

EVENT of the DAY: Free Ballroom Dancing 

Every Monday evening the Queens Library Forest Hills branch offers free ballroom dancing lessons from Jing Chen, a skilled instructor who studied dance with internationally-acclaimed dancers. Everyone from  beginners to advanced students are invited to come. Click here for more info or to submit an event of your own

Two Queens men die in small plane crash off Long Island

A small plane crash off the coast of Long Island on Saturday claimed the lives of two men from Queens. Read more: NY1

Long, difficult road to justice at Guantanamo Bay trials of Khalid Sheikh Mohammed and cohorts

Queens resident Merrilly Noeth says she’s willing to wait for justice for her son Michael, a Navy artist killed at the Pentagon on 9/11. Read more: New York Daily News

No bomb found at Times Square subway station

A suitcase that was thought to be suspicious was discovered on the mezzanine level of the Times Square subway station at around 9 p.m. on Sunday. Read more: ABC New York

Fan hospitalized after falling off escalator at MetLife Stadium

A football fan was fighting for his life late Sunday night, after falling at least 21 feet from a MetLife Stadium escalator. Read more: CBS New York

Candidates seek foreign policy edge in 3rd debate

Still neck-and-neck after all these months, Barack Obama and Mitt Romney head into their third and final debate with each man eager to project an aura of personal strength and leadership while raising doubts about the steadiness and foreign policy credentials of the other guy. Read more: AP

Lance Armstrong stripped of Tour de France titles

Cycling’s governing body has agreed to strip Lance Armstrong of his seven Tour de France titles and ban him for life. Read more: ABC New York/AP

Northeast Queens real estate


| mchan@queenscourier.com

Copyright (C), Multiple Listing Service of Long Island, Inc, 2004

Bayside, Auburndale and Fresh Meadows offer a wide range of housing opportunities, from cozy little co-ops to stately manses, with prices ranging from under $500,000 to over $3 million. Here’s a range of what you can find on the tree-lined streets of this tri-neighborhood region. Information and photos are courtesy of www.mlsli.com and www.homes.com.

 

33-35 200th Street in Bayside

This charming, semi-detached Colonial one-family home was built in 1930 and is located near two public schools and a slew of shops with ample transportation options. It features three bedrooms, two full baths, an eat-in kitchen, a formal dining room, a finished basement, gas heat, new siding, updated windows and a washer and dryer. It is selling for $455,000.

 

 

67-07 213th Street in Bayside

Located in a quiet area lined with tall oak trees, this one-family home was built in 1955 and is in original condition. There are three bedrooms, one full bath, one half–bath with a private driveway, an eat-in kitchen, a full basement and wall-to-wall carpeting. This home is going for $499,000.

 

 

212-06 64th Avenue in Bayside

This gorgeous Mediterranean-style one-family mansion features six bedrooms, eight full baths and one half-bath. Newly built in 2010, this “diamond” stucco building has 8,200 square feet of living space, with a large gourmet kitchen, big windows and high ceilings. The property also includes a private driveway with a two-car garage, a deck, a fireplace and skylight. The listing price is $2,749,888.

 

 

75-52 185th Street in Fresh Meadows

A “mint” one-family residence, this brick home features four bedrooms, three full baths, one half-bath, wood floors, a welcoming foyer and many more additions. It is selling for $979,000.

 

 

 

 

75-56 195th Street in Fresh Meadows

This beautiful and completely renovated four-bedroom home with hardwood floors has granite countertops, gorgeous landscaping and a huge lot. It also features a wood burning fireplace, a two-car garage and lots of closet space. The listing price is $849,000.

 

75-20 188th Street in Fresh Meadows

A brick home built in 1950, this property features four bedrooms, two full baths, a home office, a full basement, wood floors and a private driveway with a one-car garage, among many amenities. This home is going for $629,999.

 

7 Summit Place in Malba

Located in the heart of Malba, near Auburndale, this gorgeous 7,000 square foot home features five bedrooms with one full bath each and one bedroom with one bath on the first floor. The master bedroom has a balcony and a loft. This home is going for $3,575,000.

 

 

 

154-57 12th Avenue in Beechhurst

This spacious colonial home, located close to Auburndale, boasts having four bedrooms, two-and-a-half baths with a totally finished basement that can serve as a full apartment. It also features an updated and very large eat-in kitchen with granite counter tops, a large living room with a fireplace. It is selling for $849,000.

Man wanted for attempted rape of teen in Queens park


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of NYPD

The NYPD is asking for the public’s help in identifying a suspect wanted for an attempted rape in Fresh Meadows.

On August 21, at about 10:30 p.m., the suspect approached a 17 year old girl at Peck Park , said police. He then knocked her to the ground and attempted to rape her, but the  victim kicked the suspect in the chest and fled the scene.

The suspect is described as white, 40 to 50 years old, approximately  5 ’11 and 225 pounds, and speaks with an Eastern European accent.

Anyone with information in regards to this incident is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit tips by logging onto the Crime Stoppers website at WWW.NYPDCRIMESTOPPERS.COM or by texting their tips to 274637 (CRIMES) then enter TIP577. All calls are strictly confidential.

 

 

Nily Rozic bests Jerry Iannece in 25th District race


| mchan@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Melissa Chan

First-time candidate Nily Rozic of the 25th Assembly District is one step closer to Albany after overtaking her Queens County Democratic Party-backed opponent by close to 500 votes last week, according to unofficial results.

“This campaign reveals the true believers, the true Democrats, the true feminists, the true progressives, the true reformers and really the true believers in the American dream,” Rozic said. “We really did big things tonight.”

The Fresh Meadows Assembly hopeful reigned triumphant by 56 percent over her rival, Community Board 11 Chair Jerry Iannece, who brought in 496 fewer votes. With 100 percent of precincts reporting, Rozic raked in 2,245 votes to Iannece’s 1,749, unofficial results showed.

Rozic served as the chief of staff to Assemblymember Brian Kavanagh before setting forth with her dreams to reach the Capitol. At her late night victory party, held at the Sly Fox Inn on Union Turnpike in Fresh Meadows, she called her former boss a “brilliant political mentor.”

“I respect you deeply, more than you probably know. I really mean it when I say I struck gold when I strolled into your office on St. Mark’s Place eight years ago,” Rozic said to Kavanagh, who was in attendance. “I’ll see you in Albany.”

Kavanagh told The Courier the voters of the district made a “resounding choice” in choosing Rozic.

“She’s really somebody who’s proven herself to be someone who cares about the right issues and really cares about her community,” he said. “It’s a great night for this community and certainly a great night for somebody who’s going to be a great leader at the state level.”

Rozic went into the primary touting major endorsements, including those from the New York Times, New York Daily News, Emily’s List, League of Conservation Voters and the Working Families Party.

Iannece, an attorney and longtime community activist from Bayside, had the backing of the Queens County Democratic Party and several of the borough’s elected officials, but his ties with the county may have worked against him in the end, according to Rozic.

“The 25th Assembly District wants someone who’s independent, someone who offers a different perspective and is a fresh voice for our neighborhood,” Rozic said.

But Iannece disagreed, saying the victor won the battle based on “sleazy tactics” and dirty campaigning.

“She went out with wolf packs, bashing me at doors and poll sites, calling me anti-Semitic, handing out literature with fake endorsements from Grace Meng, suppressing my vote in Bayside Hills, calling me a political hack,” Iannece said. “I spent 25 years doing the right thing and this 26 year old, who’s done nothing, comes and bashes me and seizes the day.”

Iannece admitted to getting into a verbal fight with Rozic at a poll site over a mailer she distributed that linked her with Assemblymember Grace Meng, a popular figure in the Asian community.

Meng had endorsed Iannece over Rozic, but the palm card compares the two “strong” women as being both endorsed by the New York Times.

“It was like Pearl Harbor the way we were being attacked at the polls,” Iannece said, adding that he was also being depicted as a “machine” candidate. “I didn’t expect someone to do that vile stuff to another person. How badly do you want to win to do that stuff? That was wrong. I didn’t do that to her. But it worked. People bought that.”

Iannece — who had previously, but unsuccessfully, run for City Council in 2001 and 2009 — said it was highly unlikely for him to seek public office in the future and even to continue his role as a community board chair.

“I haven’t made my mind up yet. It’s still fresh. I’m still very emotional,” he said. “Right now, I’m thinking of packing it in with everything. I’m a little disgusted and discouraged. It’s just the wrong message.”

Rozic will take on Republican community activist Abe Fuchs in the November general election.

The newly-redrawn district mostly encompasses Fresh Meadows and parts of Utopia, Oakland Gardens and Bayside. The seat is currently held by Assemblymember Rory Lancman, who decided not to seek re-election after his failed Congressional primary run in June against Meng.