Tag Archives: Forest Hills Garden

Broker of the Week: Susanna Hof, Terrace Sotheby’s International Realty


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Susanna Hof

Susanna Hof and her husband Rob are owners and lead brokers of Terrace Sotheby’s International Realty. Hof has deep roots in Forest Hills, where real estate has been part of her family for generations. She is actively involved in neighborhood organizations, working to improve and preserve those qualities that make Forest Hills a unique community within an urban metropolis. Hof recently spoke to Real Estate Editor Liam La Guerre about the residential market in Forest Hills.  

La Guerre: Why should people move to Forest Hills?

Hof: People who know Forest Hills would agree that it’s very unique. It’s in New York City and it takes only 13 minutes to get to midtown Manhattan from Forest Hills, but it has the look of the suburbs.

La Guerre: What makes it appealing?

Hof: Here in Forest Hills, you honestly get more bang for your buck. It has a very lively atmosphere with many great restaurants and the West Side Tennis Club. How many places can you live this close to Manhattan and have a country club with a junior Olympic-sized pool? Throughout the whole community, there are little parks that are often filled with children playing. We also have Forest Park, where there is horseback riding, a golf course, playgrounds, and jogging paths and bike paths. It’s quite an astounding number of factors that people are looking for.

La Guerre: Has the Forest Hills Tennis Stadium, which recently started playing concerts again, added value to neighborhood?

Hof: I think the concerts have been working out really well. They are bringing people here so that they see the community, but it’s adding an element of hip to the area. If you add this hip element to it, mixed with good restaurants and fun places to go, it kind of becomes something for everybody.

La Guerre: What are the residential prices like compared to other areas in the city?

Hof: Here prices have risen significantly in the past three years. We found this year that houses selling under the $2 million point have multiple offers the first week.

La Guerre: In terms of Queens, the borough is selling at a slower pace than last year. From your experience has it been the same in Forest Hills?

Hof: No, definitely hotter. Things are selling very quickly. Over the $2 million point things are a little tougher, but under $2 million things are just flying off the shelves. It’s the price point that people can afford. What used to be a year ago $1.1 million is now definitely a strong $1.5 million. And what was $1.5 million is now $1.9 million, because of the increase over the year.

La Guerre: How diverse is the residential market in Forest Hills?

Hof: Forest Hills is a very diverse community. It was founded to be diverse, and in that sense there are all different size houses. There are smaller townhouses, there are medium-sized detached houses, and there are larger, more estate-like properties, and there are condos around the gardens in Forest Hills and newer ones being built in the neighborhood. There are also co-ops and rental buildings.

La Guerre: With the recent completion of luxury condo building The Aston, do you think developers are noticing Forest Hills?

Hof: I think they are looking at where we are — 13 minutes from Manhattan — [and] the cost of real estate in the city, so they are seeing this as very desirable living situation for people who are looking to go into the city but want to live outside the city.

La Guerre: How do you see Forest Hills transforming in the future?

Hof: Homes in Forest Hills Gardens have strict architectural standards. You can’t tear down those houses. People can’t come in and take down an old Tudor. It just can’t happen and it won’t happen. In terms of Queens Boulevard, there was a change in zoning upping the stories. And those older, lower story buildings will probably be taken down and things like The Aston will replace them. In terms of Austin Street, it would be nice if that could be upgraded. Hopefully with a new interest in this direction that would improve the area.

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West Nile spraying to target areas of Queens this week


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of NYC Department of Health

On Wednesday, Aug. 27, there will be West Nile spraying in parts of Queens to help reduce the mosquito population and the risk of the disease.

The spraying will take place between the hours of 8:15 p.m. and 6 a.m. the next morning. In case of bad weather, the application will be delayed until Thursday, Aug. 28 during the same hours.

The following neighborhoods are being treated due to rising West Nile virus activity with high mosquito populations, according to the city’s Health Department:

Parts of Auburndale, Murray Hill and Flushing (Bordered by 25th Avenue to the north; Murray Street to the west; 45th Avenue to the south; and 192nd Street, Francis Lewis Boulevard and Utopia Parkway to the east).

Parts of Elmhurst, Forest Hills, Forest Hills Garden, Forest Park, Glendale, Maspeth, Middle Village, Rego Park and Woodhaven (Bordered by 63rd Avenue, 80th Street and Long Island Expressway to the north; eastern boundary of Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Metropolitan Avenue, 73rd Place, Myrtle Avenue and eastern boundaries of Mt. Lebanon and Mt. Hope to west; Park Lane South to the south; and Metropolitan Avenue and Alderton Street to the east).

For the application, the Health Department will spray pesticide from trucks and use a very low concentration of Anvil®, 10 + 10, a synthetic pesticide. When properly used, this product poses no significant risks to human health.

The Health Department recommends that people take the following precautions to minimize direct exposure:

  • Whenever possible, stay indoors during spraying. People with asthma or other respiratory conditions  are encouraged to stay inside during spraying since direct exposure could worsen these conditions.
  • Air conditioners may remain on, however, if you wish to reduce the possibility of indoor exposure to pesticides, set the air conditioner vent to the closed position, or choose the re-circulate function.
  •  Remove children’s toys, outdoor equipment, and clothes from outdoor areas during spraying. If  outdoor equipment and toys are exposed to pesticides, wash them with soap and water before using  again.
  • Wash skin and clothing exposed to pesticides with soap and water. Always wash your produce thoroughly with water before cooking or eating.

 

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