Tag Archives: Flushing Town Hall

The Catskills Comes to Queens celebrates the best in farm-to-table fare


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photos by Kelly Marie Mancuso

BY KELLY MARIE MANCUSO

Foodies from across the borough were given the chance to sample farm-fresh epicurean delights during The Catskills Comes to Queens, a tasting event celebrating the farm-to-table movement, held at Flushing Town Hall on Saturday.

The culinary event was created by New York Epicurean Events co-founders Chef David Noeth and Joe DiStefano, famed food writer behind Chopsticks and Marrow, the wildly popular guide to adventurous eating in Queens.

“As someone who’s been writing about food in Queens for years, it’s always been a dream of mine to do a food festival,” DiStefano explained. “In early 2015, I met Ellen Kodadek, the executive and artistic director of Flushing Town Hall, and she told me that they wanted to do more culinary programming. For months beforehand, I’d been having all sorts of wonderful meals made with Catskills-sourced ingredients—grass-feed beef, farm-fresh eggs, free-range chicken, locally foraged mushrooms—at my business partner David Noeth’s house.”

“At some point the idea hit us: Why don’t we go into business together and help showcase all these wonderful products, help the farmers and expose the people of Queens to some great food?” DiStefano added.

Chef Nate Felder's pork belly

Chef Nate Felder’s Berkshire pork belly with red pepper marmalade.

The Catskills Comes to Queens featured a delectable array of mountain-fresh fare from some of the borough’s best chefs. Chef David Noeth’s beef heart tartare was accompanied by cheese from Vulto Creamery in Noeth’s native Walton, New York.

Chef Nate Felder of The Astor Room in Astoria topped tender maple syrup-cured Berkshire pork belly with a red pepper marmalade and served them over a bed of sour cream grits. Lamb and goat tacos dressed in homemade queso fresco, crisp corn salsa and an earthy corn crema were on the menu at New World Home Cooking Co. courtesy of The Food Network’s 2010 Chopped champion Chef Ric Orlando.

IMG_5786

The Food Network’s 2010 “Chopped” champion and New World Home Cooking Co. Chef Ric Orlando.

Smokehouse favorites were popular throughout the festival. Chef Alfonso Zhicay of Casa del Chef Bistro in Woodside featured succulent short ribs braised in an intoxicating blend of fruit chutney and Madeira wine served atop a briny bed of homemade pickled carrots and cabbage.

Chef Danny Brown's

Chef Danny Brown’s torchon of La Belle Farms foie gras and guinea fowl.

Chef Danny Brown, of Danny Brown’s Wine Bar and Kitchen in Forest Hills, crafted an exquisite torchon of La Belle Farms foie gras and guinea fowl accompanied by hazelnut oil and fresh microgreens. Bravo’s “Top Chef” Season 7 runner-up and Sotto 13‘s Chef Ed Cotton offered a twist on traditional American fare with his mini rabbit and mortadella hot dogs served between toasted brioche buns topped with mustard and spicy kirby relish.

Bravo's "Top Chef" Season 7 runner up and Sotto 13 Chef Ed Cotton prepares his rabbit and mortadella hot dogs

Bravo’s “Top Chef” season 7 runner-up and Sotto 13 Chef Ed Cotton prepares his rabbit and mortadella hot dogs.

Smokey fare ruled the outdoor courtyard of Flushing Town Hall as well, where Chef Tyson Ho’s whole barbecued hog from Arrogant Swine took center stage, its head displayed on the table, presiding over the festivities. Guests were delighted by bite-sized treats, such as the lamb sliders from Chef Harry Hawk of Schnack and the Eagle Hollow Farms barbecue chicken sliders from Chef Lou Elrose of the soon-to-be-opened Charred smokehouse and bar in Middle Village.

Smoked beef tongue sliders from Harry & Ida's Meat and Supply Co.

Smoked beef tongue sliders from Harry & Ida’s Meat and Supply Co.

Adventurous eaters enjoyed the warm, earthy smoked beef tongue sliders topped with birch bark-infused mayo and pickled heirloom tomatoes from Chef Will Horowitz of Harry and Ida’s Meat and Supply Co., while M. Wells Steakhouse Chef Hugue Dufour’s lamb tagine provided a flavorful feast for the senses.

Chef Hugue Dufour unveiling his gigantic lamb tagine

Chef Hugue Dufour unveiling his gigantic lamb tagine.

Silk Cakes bakery’s Pandan cupcakes topped with coconut buttercream and white chocolate truffle nearly vanished in an instant. Delicate pastries by Rudolf Merlin at Creme French bakery and Leske’s Bakery’s peanut butter and Cotton Hill goat cheese donuts provided a sweet finish.

“We like to think that we’re bringing the best products in New York State to the New York’s best chefs at New York City’s best venue,” DiStefano added. “And what better place to do it than Flushing, which was once itself farmland.”


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Flushing Town Hall to host food and wine tasting event on Aug. 1


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Image courtesy of Flushing Town Hall

BY KIRSTEN E. PAULSON

Flushing Town Hall will play host to a farm-to-festival food and wine tasting event, The Catskills Comes to Queens, on Saturday, Aug. 1, starting at 6 p.m.

The night will feature an all-star lineup of 20 chefs from the Catskills, Queens and the greater New York City area, including Hugue Dufour of M. Wells in Long Island City; Will Horowitz of Ducks Eatery in the East Village; Ed Cotton of Sotto 13 in the West Village; and Tyson Ho of Arrogant Swine in Bushwick.

The festival will showcase and celebrate the agricultural bounty of the Catskills, with plenty of grass-fed beef, heritage pork, farm-fresh produce and more. Brewers, vintners and cider makers from the region will be at the event as well to pour and serve their wares to guests.

Some of the items on the menu for this event are gigantic tagine of lamb (Hugue Dufour, M. Wells Steakhouse), crispy beef tripe with Sichuan peppercorn and jalapeno (Landhaus), maple cured pork belly with sour cream grits and red pepper jelly (Natty Felder, The Astor Room), and braised short rib with tamarind and fruit chutney (Alfonso Zhicay, Casa del Chef Bistro). Beers from Keegan Ales and Roscoe Brewing, as well as Awestruck Ciders, will be poured.

Tickets for the event are $95 for the public and $76 for Flushing Town Hall members.

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Flushing night market to bring community together


| asuriel@queenscourier.com

File photo

Flushing residents will be enjoying the neighborhood’s first ever community night market next week for “Flushing Night Out.”

The event will be taking place on Thursday, July 16, from 6 to 11 p.m. at the iconic Flushing Town Hall, which is located at 137-35 Northern Blvd.

While local vendors will be selling food, fashion and other goods at the event, a source close to the Greater Flushing Chamber of Commerce tells The Courier that much of the focus will be on cultural activities.

Live music and entertainment will be provided to create a warm and lively atmosphere, and the whole program is designed to showcase the unique culture of Flushing and its citizens who can trace their roots and culture to countries all around the world. This will not be just another market, but a space for family and friends to come together to create a sense of community.

Local organizations involved with the event include the Flushing Chinese Business Association, the Union Street Small Business Association and Green Earth Urban Gardens, among others still to be announced.

The chamber will announce additional details at a press conference scheduled for Tuesday morning.

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Open call for Queens-based LGBTQ performing artists for Jackson Heights concert


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/File Photo

Flushing Town Hall is looking for LGBTQ entertainers to help kick off Pride Month in Jackson Heights this June with music, words and the performing arts.

The nonprofit organization is holding an open call for Queens-based LGBTQ performing artists to take part in a free, outdoor concert on June 6 at 5 p.m. in Diversity Plaza, located at 37th Road and 74th Street, in Jackson Heights.

The LGBTQ-themed concert, sponsored in part by Councilman Daniel Dromm, will celebrate the start of Pride Month and the immigrant LGBTQ communities in the borough. The following day, the organization Queens Pride will be hosting the 2015 Pride Parade and Festival in Jackson Heights down 37th Avenue. 

Flushing Town Hall is encouraging all LGBTQ musicians, dancers, poets and spoken word artists, actors and theater artists, and other performing artists based in Queens to submit applications. 

“It’s a great opportunity for artists based in Queens to perform for their peers in a free setting,” said Sami Abu Shumays, Flushing Town Hall deputy director. “It’s an exciting outdoor event.”

Applications must be submitted by May 1 through email to Shumays at sshumays@flushingtownhall.org with the subject line “LGBTQ OPEN CALL 2015.”

The emails should include a statement of interest and description of proposed performance (200 words maximum), biographical details (300 words maximum), and work samples. Artists may submit mp3, jpg or video files. The samples can be included as an attachment or via a URL where they can be viewed, for example on YouTube or a website link.

Flushing Town Hall will then select three to five applicants to perform during the June concert. Artists will be notified during the week of May 11. 

For more information, click here.

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First charter meeting for Greater Flushing Chamber of Commerce


| rpozarycki@queenscourier.com

City Council Member Peter Koo swears in the Greater Flushing Chamber of Commerce board of directors last Wednesday. (photo courtesy of Koo's office)

The Greater Flushing Chamber of Commerce continued its growth on the afternoon of March 18 with its first membership meeting that attracted numerous civic and business leaders.

The chamber’s first formal task was to elect a board of directors to oversee the organization’s operation under the stewardship of co-chairs Simon Gerson and Chris Kui. The organization also appointed a council of advisers and approved its corporate bylaws and agenda for the months ahead.

“The Flushing Chamber is proud to provide leadership to ensure the continued prosperity of our community,” Gerson said. “Our local businesses will benefit from the networking, education and advocacy opportunities that the chamber provides.”

Greater Flushing looks to replace the void that the 80-year-old Flushing Chamber of Commerce left when it dissolved in 2012. Many blamed the group’s inability to change with the times and neighborhood’s demographics as key factors resulting in its demise.

But Greater Flushing Executive Director John Choe said the upstart group aims to create a “multicultural and modern” organization catering to all businesses and people in Flushing from every background. Greater Flushing already has about 70 businesses as members, and Choe hopes that number will double in the next few months.

“I think Flushing deserves a chamber that will advocate on behalf of the entire community,” he said. “We haven’t had a chamber for a long time, even though we’re the fourth-largest commercial district in the city.”

Greater Flushing already has a “very full plate” of programs aiming to serve and enrich businesses, residents and visitors alike, Choe added, including a free English language program in partnership with Monroe College. The chamber also wants to sponsor several street fairs this summer and launch free financial literacy programs.

The chamber is also considering creating a “formal lending circle” with established credit agencies, Choe noted. Traditional lending circles often practiced among immigrant families involve members donating funds into a central account, with the lump sum then provided to someone launching a business or buying a home, among other purposes.

The formal circle, Choe said, would follow regulations and ensure accountability with the borrowers.

City Councilman Peter Koo had the honor of installing the newly-elected board of directors and threw his support to the Greater Flushing Chamber of Commerce, saying the group would provide “small business owners with the resources they need to expand and grow.”

“We are still living in a climate of over-regulation that remains challenging for many small business owners, so the Flushing Chamber will be a welcomed addition to our diverse business community,” Koo said.

Greater Flushing’s board of directors consists of Gerson, Kui and Don Capalbi of the Queensboro Hill Flushing Civic Association, Perka Chan of HealthFirst, Michael Cheng of Epos Global Management, Taehoon Kim of Regen Acupuncture, Ellen Kodadek of Flushing Town Hall, Michael Lam of Century Homes Realty Group LLC, Alice Lee of HealthPlus Amerigroup, Alfred Rankins of the Latimer House Museum, Maureen Regan of Green Earth Urban Gardens and Leo Zhang of the law firm of Geng & Zhang.

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Flushing Lunar New Year celebration to be marked with first joint festivities between Korean and Chinese communities


| ejankiewicz@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Eric Jankiewicz

As Lunar New Year approaches, Asian communities in Flushing are trying to strengthen their relationship and will be holding a joint celebration for the holiday.

The Korean and Chinese communities are coming together on Feb. 15 to hold a parade for the beginning of their new calendar year. And Flushing Town Hall has announced a celebration between the two groups.

“The Chinese and Korean communities are developing strong roots in Flushing and so we have to do things together to avoid misunderstanding between the two groups,” said Jamison Moon, a member of the Korean American Association of Queens. “Our two communities don’t usually associate but we are trying to create stronger ties.

The Lunar New Year for many Asian cultures falls on Feb. 19 this year and it will be the year of the sheep. In past celebrations, hundreds of people have come out to celebrate in the parade, and organizers are expecting a similar showing of people with an increased boost from both groups celebrating together.

The day will be filled with festivities like traditional Chinese and Korean dances, free rice-cake soups and a K-Pop singing contest.

The joint celebration comes on the heels of a couple of new laws aimed at increasing the awareness of Flushing’s diverse communities. In December a new law was passed that would allow schools in Flushing to close for Lunar New Year, along with other holidays like Diwali. And the city declared Jan.13 the first Korean-American day.

Between 2008 and 2011, the city’s Korean population jumped 11 percent to more than 103,000, according to the Asian American Federation. And Queens has its own vibrant Korean community, which often holds events, like last year’s Senior Olympics, to celebrate its culture.

Flushing Town Hall will meanwhile host a series of events throughout the month with highlights including a bazaar and an Earth, Water, Fire and Wind dance.

“We’re bringing in the new year by being together,” Moon said. “And to be able to do this between two historically strained groups is a great victory.”

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Flushing community criticizes modern look of planned building


| ejankiewicz@queenscourier.com

Renderings courtesy of Raymond Architecture

Flushing’s Great Wall is being torn down.

Great Wall Supermarket, on Northern Boulevard and Leavitt Street, will be replaced next year by a glass-clad, 11-story building after the supermarket’s owners decided to not renew the lease, according to city records. The proposed building’s modern, sleek look will tower next to the Civil War-era Flushing Town Hall, causing many in the community to criticize the new building for not conforming to the appearance of its historic neighbor.

“This thing looks like it’s something out of Miami Vice,” Flushing resident Vincent Amato said. “You can kiss goodbye any sense of history this neighborhood still had.”

Despite community resistance, Community Board 7 passed a request to change the area’s zoning, allowing the building’s developer, George Chu, to move another step closer toward his goal of developing a mixed-use building with a hotel, store fronts, community space and apartment units.

Flushing Town Hall wrote a letter expressing their support of the new development, and the planned community space will be used often by Town Hall events. During the community board meeting, the board members defended their decision to allow the building to be constructed.
“We’re not granting something that’s significantly different then what could be there,” Chuck Apelian said. “None of us are negligent of the history.”

FLUSHING_2

Flushing Town Hall was once the center of civic life, serving as the seat of local government until the mid-19th century before Flushing and other towns in Queens were absorbed into Greater New York City.

But now it is a lone reminder of the past in the center of a new Flushing that is undergoing a building boom. Nearby, a similar plan for a mixed-use building, including community space and a hotel, has been approved and is set to be built.

The hotel in the new building at the Great Wall site will occupy floors three to eight, with the top three floors divided into 43 apartment units. There will be 10,000 square feet of commercial space on the ground floor for restaurants and coffee shops, according to Eric Palatnik, the developers’ spokesman.

“We’re going to liven up the street with a sidewalk plaza area,” he said.

As the meeting ended, Apelian said, “This is a tragedy not just for Flushing, but the whole nation. Hundreds of years of American history will be overshadowed by this new building.”

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Box art show guaranteed to surprise buyers


| ejankiewicz@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Flushing Town Hall

Artists from around the world gathered in Flushing Town Hall on Monday to wrap their art in boxes as part of an art exhibition called “Boxes: Lost in Circulation.”

On Friday, people visiting the art exhibition will open about 50 boxes that hold the artwork of 14 artists. Patrons will pay $50 per box — without seeing the art or knowing who created it.

The curator, Hyunsuk Kim, is hoping to blur the lines between famous and obscure artists by putting everyone’s work in indistinguishable boxes.

“An artist and a work of an artist are constrainedly positioned in the capitalistic system. An artwork is often being treated as worthless if it is a work of an unknown artist,” Kim said. “If your name is not a brand, your works are not born yet although they are made.”

Kim hopes that the exhibition will help “diminish inequalities among artists and to let people focus on artworks.”

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Anonymous donor gives Flushing Town Hall fundraiser challenge


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

File photo

BY PAULINA TAM 

An anonymous benefactor has given a proposal to Flushing Town Hall: If the arts center can raise $35,000 in donations by Feb. 28, 2015, the donor will match that amount, meaning that it could receive $70,000 in donations if the challenge is met.

Flushing Town Hall’s Executive and Artistic Director Ellen Kodadek says they are excited to take on the challenge. “It’s not every day that an institutional supporter presents such an offer,” she said. “We’re confident that many of those people — from Queens and beyond — who have enjoyed Flushing Town Hall over the years will step up to the plate and pitch in.”

A member of Flushing Town Hall’s board of trustees served as a channel for the donor’s proposition. The undisclosed donor describes Flushing Town Hall as a hidden gem that will further shine through the generous donations of others. “I truly believe in this institution — and I hope that this challenge will motivate others to open their wallets and hearts, thereby enabling this gem to be brighter than ever, enriching the culture of this diverse community,” the anonymous donor said.

Donations to the “Challenge Grant” must be newly accepted or increased contributions time stamped from Sept. 8 until Feb 28. For more information about the grant or to make a donation, visit www.flushingtownhall.org/35challenge.

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Flushing woman uses experience in advice column for undocumented youth


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Photo Courtesy Angy Rivera

Angy Rivera, a formerly undocumented immigrant, knew which words she wanted to let out when she was invited to take the stage at Flushing Town Hall last month.

In her original poem, “Community Not Condominiums,” the 23-year-old Flushing resident describes in detail the communities of Jackson Heights, Flushing and Corona through following a food vendor named “Doña María.”

Doña María is up before the sun rises
Moon shining on her face she gets ready for the morning commute
It’s her job to feed others
Moon shining on her face ella empieza a cocinar arepas, tamales, café y chocolate
Arepas made with corn and cheese
They start to melt as soon as they touch your mouth.

“At first I thought, ‘Oh wait, what if someone doesn’t understand that,” Rivera said about writing the poem in both Spanish and English. “But that’s how it is here in Queens.”

The college junior, who is studying culture and deviance with a minor in human services at John Jay College, said she felt pride when writing the poem for being part of “such a beautiful community” and remembering all the great details of each neighborhood. Yet, she said she also felt sadness when thinking about the idea of growing up and facing changes.

How will Doña María sell her tamales, arepas, café y chocolate
When the streets becomes businesses she cannot pronounce
Will her café con leche compete with Starbucks?
These signs of a cleaner and safer Queens erase the resiliency already here
We weren’t dirty to begin with
Will her house stand untouched during gentrification?

“That’s what I wanted to make sure came across, as much as it’s a celebration of Queens, on the flipside it’s about things we can lose,” she said.

This wasn’t the first time Rivera’s words reached a much larger audience. In 2009 she joined the nonprofit New York State Youth Leadership Council, the first volunteer undocumented youth and membership led organization started in 2007, as an intern.

The Colombian-native, who was undocumented for 19 years and has recently obtained a visa, went on to create a national undocumented youth advice column in 2010 called “Ask Angy.”

“It was the first time I met with other immigrant young people that wanted to change things that they saw unjust,” said Rivera, who immigrated with her family to the United States just one week shy of her fourth birthday. “Through them I grew as a person.”

Now as a core member of the organization, she helps out in the media/outreach and arts/self-expression programs. Through her weekly column, she said she gets people writing to her from all around the nation about different subjects undocumented youths face, such as driving without a license and deferred action.

Although she said it is tricky at times because she doesn’t always have answers, especially when it comes to legal topics, she said the column has helped her learn different laws depending on states.

“Being involved helped me become more open about a lot of things and helped me learn a lot of new stuff,” she said. “It’s been very healing to meet other people in the same situation as you. It’s always been nice to have a group to understand.”

Continuing her involvement in activism, Rivera has also become part of Queens Neighborhoods United, a coalition created to build power and develop leadership in Corona, Elmhurst and Jackson Heights. The group recently has gone around cleaning the streets down Roosevelt Avenue.

Rivera now plans to recite “Community Not Condominiums” at a new quarterly series called “Queens Documented,” which launches on July 20 at Terraza 7 located at 40-19 Gleane St. in Elmhurst and features stories and music from people who migrated to Queens.

To read Rivera’s full poem, click here.

 

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Queens’ Morning Roundup


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

morning roundup

TODAY’S FORECAST

Friday: Rain likely. High 66. Winds SSE at 15 to 25 mph. Chance of rain 90%. Rainfall around a half an inch. Friday night: Cloudy with periods of rain. Areas of fog developing late. Low around 55F. SSW winds at 15 to 25 mph, decreasing to 5 to 10 mph. Chance of rain 90%. Rainfall near a half an inch.

EVENT OF THE DAY: To Bird & Dizzy with Love

Flushing Town Hall presents “To Bird & Dizzy with Love,” a musical homage to Charlie “Bird” Parker and John Birks “Dizzy” Gillespie, the two men most responsible for creating the Be-Bop vernacular and changing the way jazz musicians approached improvisation. Pre-show discussion with Jimmy Heath, music director and conductor of the Queens Jazz Orchestra, is Friday at 7:30 p.m.; the show starts at 8 p.m. Click here for more info or to submit an event of your own

Next wave of popular green cabs hits TLC snag

The new chair of the Taxi and Limousine Commission on Thursday said she couldn’t guarantee that the next batch of 6,000 green taxi permits would be issued at any point in 2014, as previously planned. Read more: New York Post

Fast food workers around the world strike for higher wages

Fast food workers around the world walked out on their jobs Thursday to protest their low wages. Read more: am New York

Some subway emergency door alarms turned off by MTA

The MTA made its noisy subway a bit quieter over the last year by eliminating hundreds of emergency door alarms. Read more: am New York

Sophia, Jacob top names for New York newborns

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New round of GM recalls affects 2.7 million vehicles

General Motors announced five more recalls Thursday, affecting 2.7 million of its cars. Read more: CBS New York

 

Queens’ Morning Roundup


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

morning roundup

TODAY’S FORECAST 

Tuesday: Cloudy early, then off and on rain showers for the afternoon. High around 65. Winds S at 10 to 20 mph. Chance of rain 40%. Tuesday night: Becoming partly cloudy after some evening light rain. Low 47. Winds WNW at 10 to 20 mph. Chance of rain 70%.

EVENT OF THE DAY: Earth Day Festival

Develop your green thumb, learn about bee-keeping and the importance of clean waterways while making sculptures, jewelry and art out of recycled materials. Free at Flushing Town Hall at 1 p.m. Click here for more info or to submit an event of your own

Judge weeps during Queens pedophile sentencing

A Queens Supreme Court judge broke down and cried — and said he had never presided over a more troubling case — as he sentenced Kerbet (Kirby) Dixon to at least 25 1/3 years in prison for sexually abusing two young members of his family in his Queens home in 2008 and 2009. Read more: New York Daily News

Officials probe whether EMTs were delayed to fire that killed 2 kids

Mayor de Blasio said the city is investigating whether there was a delay in getting EMTs to a fire where two 4-year-old children died Sunday after one of them may have been playing with a lighter. Read more: NBC New York

Mayor Bill de Blasio: FDNY Commissioner Sal Cassano in ‘interim role’

Mayor Bill de Blasio confirmed Monday that FDNY Commissioner Sal Cassano is serving in an “interim role.” Read more: CBS New York

Cuomo holds huge lead over GOP challenger – for now

Gov. Cuomo holds an enormous 30-point lead over GOP challenger Rob Astorino — but that margin would be cut in half if a ” more liberal” third party candidate entered the race, according to a poll released Tuesday. Read more: New York Post

Report: Sandy’s fallout affecting small business in tri-state area

When Long Beach delicatessen owner P.J. Whelan heard the findings of a Federal Reserve Bank of New York poll released Monday on Superstorm Sandy’s effect on small businesses, he began nodding in agreement. Read more: CBS New York/AP

United Adult Ministries to honor advocates of older adults


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

United Adult Ministries will present the Rose Kryzak Senior Leadership Award to three honorees at the Flushing House Gala at Flushing Town Hall on May 8.

Honorees state Sen. Toby Ann Stavisky, Steven Goodman, Ed.D., and Alan Weinberg, LCSW, “have all soldiered on in the tradition of Rose Kryzak, making major contributions of service and caring for older adults,” said Robert F. Salant, Flushing House director of community relations.

The UAM Older Adult Ministry Award will be presented to Doris Walker, an elder of the Hollis Presbyterian Church, and Doris Ramsay, a deacon of the Valley Stream Presbyterian Church.

Tenor Daniel Rodriguez will perform at the event and will be honored with a special award for his support of various nonprofits, especially those that serve older adults.

All proceeds from the fundraising gala will support an endowment fund that allows Flushing House to remain affordable for many of the older adults who live there.

For more info, call 347-532-3025, email rsalant@uam.org or click here.

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Queens’ Morning Roundup


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

morning roundup

TODAY’S FORECAST 

Tuesday: Becoming partly cloudy after some morning light rain. Fog early. High 66. Winds SW at 20 to 30 mph. Chance of rain 70%. Tuesday night: Partly cloudy skies. Low 41. Winds WNW at 10 to 20 mph.

EVENT OF THE DAY: New York Meets Istanbul – An Exhibition of Charcoal Drawings

Meliksah Soyturk’s “New York Meets Istanbul” is an exhibition which brings the above words to life…. transporting us, through the Artist’s eye, through time and space, to another Continent. Through his work, he is bringing together two of the most wonderful cities in the world and two vastly different, yet undeniably similar cultures. At Flushing Town Hall through Sunday, April 13. Click here for more info or to submit an event of your own

Queens cab driver arrested in West Hempstead hit and run

A cab driver from Queens is under arrest and facing charges in connection with a hit and run on Long Island. Read more: ABC New York

Sen. Smith’s fraud and bribery trial set for June

A federal judge on Monday ordered state Sen. Malcolm Smith’s fraud and bribery trial to begin June 2, quietly rejecting the powerful Queens Democrat’s bid to push the date back a few months so he could smoothly seek re-election. Read more: New York Post

EXCLUSIVE: Average woman in the city earns 82 cents for man’s dollar, controller study shows

It’s still a man’s world — even in progressive New York City. Read more: New York Daily News

City Council plans 10 percent raise in its budget

Belt-tightening is out and free spending is in at the City Council, which plans to increase its own budget by more than 10 percent in a single year — six times the rate of inflation. Read more: New York Post

NTSB: Engineer in fatal Metro-North derailment has ‘severe obstructive sleep apnea’

Federal investigators have found that the engineer at the controls of the Metro-North train that derailed and left four people dead and dozens more injured has a serious sleep disorder. Read more: CBS New York/AP

Flushing Town Hall completes $1.2M renovation


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy Flushing Council on the Arts

Follow me @liamlaguerre 

 

The historic Flushing Town Hall has a new look.

The theatre and event space fully reopened on Friday, March 14, after a five-month, $1.2 million interior renovation.

The makeover will freshen up the venue after more than a dozen years of use. The Flushing Town Hall building is more than 150 years old, and it has been an active theatre for 35 years. Its last renovation was completed in 1999.

“After 15 years of extensive wear and tear on the building it was time to upgrade and to renovate,” said Ellen Kodadek, executive director of Flushing Council on Culture and the Arts, which operates the Hall.

The money for the renovation was partly funded by former Borough President Helen Marshall, various Queens City Council members and the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs.

The makeover includes new flooring in the hallways and the gift shop, a new heating, ventilation and air conditioning system (HVAC) throughout the building, and new floors and chairs in the theatre, which seats 308. The theatre’s movable risers were also replaced. Just like the old risers, the new ones will allow the theatre to transform at will.

“We are capable of taking the seats and the risers out and setting the room up so that it doesn’t look at all like a theatre, but you could do a wedding or a banquet or leave room for salsa dancing,” Kodadek said. “And that’s something very special and different about our theatre. Many theatres don’t have that capability.”

Flushing Town Hall hosts about 75 performances around the year, including jazz concerts, theatre plays, educational events for children, puppetry, dance, art galleries and workshops. They’ve also rented out the space for special events, including weddings and school graduations.

On the same day it reopened, The Queens Courier donated $1,500 to Flushing Town Hall, from money that was raised at the annual Rising Stars event. The money will be used to foster educational services for underprivileged students.

 

 

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