Tag Archives: Flushing Meadows-Corona Park

Queens Museum plays host to July art conference


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Photo via Instagram/@queensmuseum

Educators, curators and artists from across the globe will convene at the Queens Museum for a July weekend conference on art and culture in American life.

The USSEA (United States Society for Education through Art) Regional Conference will take place from July 17-19 at the museum, located in the former New York City Pavilion at Flushing Meadows-Corona Park.

Themed “An inclusive world: Bridging communities,” the conference will feature more than 65 sessions involving local, national and international museum educators, art teachers, professors and artists focused on examining how the fine arts and culture and taught in classrooms, museums and local art organizations.

Four keynote speakers will be featured at the conference: Sherry Huss, vice president of Maker Media and co-creator of the Maker Faire; Tom di Maria, director of the Creative Growth Art Center; Tim Rollins, founder of the Art and Knowledge workshop in the Bronx; and Sree Sreenivasan, chief digital officer at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Registration for the conference includes breakfast and lunch in the museum cafe, an opening reception and a weekend pass to the adjacent New York Hall of Science. Special shuttle buses to and from the Mets-Willets Point station is also part of the package.

Fees range from $45 for college students with current ID to $85 for non-USSEA members. Click here for more information.

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Flushing Meadows to hold free World’s Fair Anniversary Festival this June


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/File photo

A free festival, once again celebrating the 1939-1940 and 1964-1965 World’s Fairs, will be held at Flushing Meadows Corona Park this June with music, food and family-friendly activities.

The Sunday, June 7, event, co-hosted by Borough President Melinda Katz and Assemblywoman Margaret Markey, will also offer the chance to look back at the historic fairs.

There will be displays of World’s Fair memorabilia and vintage cars, including a classic car show courtesy of Broadway Stages and the Argento family, a guided World’s Fair history walking tour of the park to learn about the remaining structures and sculptures, and the Queens Museum’s World’s Fair exhibit, according to the Parks Department.

Kids can enjoy rides, including half off on the park’s historic carousel, craft projects, strolling magicians, a visit by Mr. Met and mini tennis clinics by the USTA. Puppets in the Park will also offer two performances of The Tales of Brier Rabbit.

Hungry fairgoers can try international foods at the LIC Flea Food Market, and musics lovers can listen to an eclectic mix of international music performed throughout the afternoon and a SummerStage concert featuring Charles Bradley & His Extraordinaires, Hollis Brown and Damien Escobar.

The 1939-1940 and 1964-1965 World’s Fairs, which each had two seasons, from April to October, ended 75 and 50 years ago this year.

In May 2014, a free World’s Fair Anniversary Festival was also held at Flushing Meadows Park. The event was part of a lineup of events to mark the anniversary of the start of the World’s Fairs, including the opening of the New York State Pavilion to the public for the first time in decades.

The World’s Fair Anniversary Festival will be held on Sunday, June 7, from 1:00 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. near the Unisphere. The SummerStage concert will start at 4 p.m.

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Lauryn Hill to perform at Louis Armstrong festival in Flushing Meadows Corona Park


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photo via Greg Chow/Flickr Creative Commons

Grammy-winning and top-charting singer Lauryn Hill is scheduled to headline the second annual Louis Armstrong’s Wonderful World festival in Flushing Meadows Corona Park on Saturday, June 20.

The free event, which takes place from noon to 8 p.m., not far from the famed jazz legend’s former Corona home and now museum, will feature musical performances, family-friendly activities and food.

Joining the R&B artist, who now goes by “Ms. Lauryn Hill,” on the festival’s main stage will be Shannon Powell’s Traditional All-Star Band, Antibalas, Ozomatli and Rebirth Brass Band.

There will also be a Backyard Bash with family-friendly activities throughout the park and DJ sets in the Queens Museum that will “recreate the memorable garden parties” that Armstrong hosted at his home. The museum will also offer tours on its Panorama of the City of New York of notable jazz spots and feature audio and video of Armstrong.

Though the event is free, tickets are required for the main stage area and can be registered for here. For a price ranging from $25 to $250, attendees can experience the event “like a VIP,” which includes everything from a T-shirt to access to a premium viewing area and indoor VIP lounge.

In its second year, Louis Armstrong’s Wonderful World celebrates the cultural legacy of the jazz musician. Armstrong, a New Orleans native, moved to Corona in 1943 and purchased the home at 34-56 107 St. shortly after marrying his wife Lucille. He lived there until his death in 1971. His wife continued to reside at the home until her passing in 1983. Twenty years later, the house, now a city and national historic landmark, opened to the public as the Louis Armstrong House Museum.

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NYS Pavilion to get free paint job


| rpozarycki@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photos by Angy Altamirano

Updated Wednesday, May 6, 1:30 p.m. 

The city Parks Department and Queens Borough President Melinda Katz announced Wednesday morning the latest efforts to spruce up the New York State Pavilion at Flushing Meadows Corona Park.

Katz and Parks Commissioner Mitchell Silver will herald a new partnership with two local labor unions — the New York Structural Steel Painting Contractors Association and the International Union of Painting and Allied Trades Local 806 District 9 — to repaint the upper portions of the Tent of Tomorrow, the elliptical steel building in the shadow of the pavilion’s space needles.

“Flushing Meadows Corona Park’s Tent of Tomorrow is an iconic symbol of Queens, but we haven’t been able to give it the treatment it deserves until now,” Silver said. “Thanks to a partnership with the Structural Steel Painters Union, the building is being restored and beautified so that it may remain a source of pride for the entire borough, and a reminder of the World’s Fairs, for years to come.”

The new paint system of the pavilion, which is expected to be completed by this fall, will serve as a protective coating and extend the life of the structure by at least 15 years.

The $3 million effort will be undertaken free of charge through a painting apprenticeship program operated by the unions, allowing painters to gain work experience.

“Due to the tremendous generosity of Painters DC 9 and the Painting Contractors Association, the pavilion will be refreshed with a new coat of paint,” Katz said. “We’re working hard to save this architectural marvel, and the facelift is a great boon to our efforts. We will restore this national treasure into a visible icon befitting the ‘World’s Borough’ for generations of families and visitors to enjoy.”

In recent years, local volunteers and historians have advocated for refurbishing the pavilion, one of the last remaining fixtures of the 1964-65 World’s Fair. The pavilion’s space needles served as observation decks, while the Tent of Tomorrow — once featuring a stained-glass roof and a terrazzo tile roadmap of New York State — was an entertainment venue.

The Tent of Tomorrow was used sporadically for years after the fair’s conclusion, but fell into disrepair along with the rest of the pavilion over the last few decades.

Full restoration of the pavilion is estimated to cost at least $43 million, according to a Parks Department announcement last November. Katz, Mayor Bill de Blasio and the City Council have already secured a combined $6 million in funds to repair the towers and its electrical infrastructure.

A group of volunteers also formed the New York State Pavilion Paint Project to provide short-term renovations while Katz and other city officials worked on a long-term plan for the pavilion’s rehabilitation.

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George Clinton to perform as part of free summer festival at Queensbridge Park


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photos courtesy of City Parks Foundation

SummerStage, the city’s largest performing arts festival, is marking its 30th anniversary with six-day mini festivals at eight local parks, including one on the Long Island City waterfront.

Queensbridge Park, located along Vernon Boulevard adjacent to the Queensboro Bridge, will host the event from July 14 to 19, featuring the “godfather of funk” George Clinton, local musicians, dance, theater and more.

“As an organization we are dedicated to working in traditionally underserved neighborhoods across the city,” said Heather Lubov, executive director of City Parks Foundation, which produces SummerStage. “By presenting artists and genres that reflect the cultures and communities in these parks, introducing disciplines such as dance or theater alongside musical performances, and providing all of this fantastic art free of charge, we are building new audiences and fostering a broader interest in the arts here in New York City.”

The musical group Chi-Lites will be kicking off the Queensbridge Park festival at 7 p.m. on July 14. The group originated from the ’70s Chicago R&B scene, and in 2000 were inducted into the Rhythm & Blues Hall of Fame.

The following night, at 7 p.m., George Clinton and Parliament Funkadelic, which was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1997, will perform.

Large Professor

Large Professor

 

Local flavor will come to the park on July 16 with Large Professor (LP) a hip-hop songwriter, producer and DJ who comes from Flushing. Also performing that night is Marley Marl, a producer and DJ hailing from Queensbridge who has made a mark on the hip-hop world.

On July 17 and 18, the festival will shift gears to theater on Friday night and dance the following evening, featuring several collaborative and creative performers.

The final day of the festival will start with family-friendly programming from 4 to 7 p.m., including award-winning and critically-acclaimed jazz trombonist Wycliffe Gordon, B-Love’s Hip Hop Jazzy Groove, and Karisma Jay and AbunDance.

Wycliffe Gordon

Wycliffe Gordon

That night the festival will close with a performance by hip-hop artist Pete Rock and a screening of “Time Is Illmatic.” The feature-length documentary examines the making of rapper Nas’ 1994 debut album “Illmatic” and his development as an artist and his influences — including a visit to his childhood home in Queensbridge.

SummerStage is also expanding its season to commemorate its 30th anniversary, from May 18 through Oct. 4, when it will offer more than 140 free music, dance, comedy, family and theater programs in 16 parks across all five boroughs.

In Queens, there will also be SummerStage events at Flushing Meadows Corona Park and Socrates Sculpture Park.

As part of the World’s Fair Anniversary Festival at Flushing Meadows on June 7, starting at 4 p.m. there will be three musical performances as part of SummerStage by singer Charles Bradley and His Extraordinaires, Hollis Brown, a rock ‘n’ roll band formed by two Queens natives, and another Queens native, violinist Damien Escobar.

Later in that month, on June 24, The Metropolitan Opera Summer Recital Series featuring Kiri Deonarine, Ginger Costa-Jackson, John Moore and pianist Dan Saunders will come to Socrates Sculpture Park in Long Island City.

For more information about SummerStage events, visit www.summerstage.org.

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Exhibition shares community ideas for Flushing Meadows Corona Park


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Photos by William Michael Fredericks/Courtesy of the Design Trust for Public Space

The voices of the people in the communities surrounding Flushing Meadows Corona Park have been heard, and now they will be able to share their ideas through a new exhibition at the Queens Museum.

The exhibition called “You Are Here: Creating a New Approach to Civic Participation in the World’s Park” kicked off on Sunday at the museum and highlights the individuals, process and proposals developing for Flushing Meadows Corona Park.

As the first phase of the community engagement partnership between the Parks Department, Queens Museum and nonprofit Design Trust for Public Space called “The World’s Park: Reconnecting a Regional Park with Its Neighbors,” the exhibition focuses on bringing the community, which has a passion for the future of the park, together through creative processes.

“For people who don’t feel very included in city life, like our newest New Yorkers, this park can be an opportunity for integration and to feel ownership over something,” said Maria Julia Echart, community adviser for the World’s Park project. “It’s not hard to have that feeling of inclusion when the time is taken to provide a meaningful learning experience, like with this project.”

The exhibition, which will run through May 3, features community-driven ideas that aim to enhance the access and circulation around and within the park.

Community advisers, who took the time to volunteer and become advocates, worked with community leaders and residents to deal with challenges surrounding access to the park, cultural resources, and programming for various ages.

“Located within Flushing Meadows Corona Park, we are keenly aware of the powerful symbiotic relationship between the park, community and museum, and while we are proud to partner with the NYC Parks, Design Trust and community advisers to expand the discourse and to pursue community-driven ideas that will bolster the future of Flushing Meadows Corona Park, we are even more excited to see the fruits of this endeavor shared with the community at large,” said Laura Raicovich, executive director of the Queens Museum.

Design concepts on view during the almost monthlong exhibition include items such as information kiosks, art installations for park entrances, wayfinding landmarks, and sensory play areas for children for special needs.

“We’re proud to be able to help Queens residents shape the future of Flushing Meadows Corona Park,” said Susan Chin, executive director for Design Trust for Public Space. “This exhibition is only the beginning of a true collaboration between community members and the city agencies to maximize the community use of this invaluable public resource and renowned destination in NYC.”

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NYS Pavilion documentary to premiere this May at Queens Theatre


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photos courtesy of Matthew Silva

More than 50 years after the World’s Fair, the New York State Pavilion is ready for another premiere.

“Modern Ruin: A World’s Fair Pavilion,” a documentary about the history of the iconic Flushing Meadows Corona Park structure and the efforts to save the neglected relic, will debut to the public at the Queens Theatre this May.

The films tells the story of the pavilion, designed by architect Philip Johnson, from its glory days at the 1964-1965 New York World’s Fair, to its time as a ‘60s concert venue and ‘70s roller rink, to its abandonment and today’s efforts to save and repurpose the structure.

Written, directed and edited by Matthew Silva, with executive producers Jake Gorst and Tracey Rennie Gorst, the documentary tries to make a case for why the pavilion should be kept around and brings to life the story behind the structure.

“It’s been really great to see how much people care about the building and I’m really eager to share this project with people in May,” Silva said.

“I really hope that people watch this movie and learn about what the building is and recognize the cultural and historic significance, and see what me and a lot of other people see,” he added.

Photo courtesy of Christine Rafalke

Roller skaters at the pavilion in the 1970s. (Photo courtesy of Christine Rafalke)

Silva, a video production teacher for Jericho Middle School and High School, had no professional filmmaking experience before he started making the documentary in February 2013. It took him two years and almost $25,000 — raised through GoFundMe and Kickstarter — to complete the project.

When Silva set out to do the film he didn’t feel like many people were talking about the pavilion, but that started to change after he began his production and the structure’s 50th anniversary in the spring of 2014 approached.

In November 2013, the Parks Department released plans to restore the pavilion, with cost estimates starting at $43 million. An option to tear it down would cost about $14 million. Support from the public and Borough President Melinda Katz, however, leaned toward preserving it.

To mark the pavilion’s 50th anniversary in April 2014, the Parks Department opened the pavilion to the public for the first time in decades. It was also named a “National Treasure” by the National Trust for Historic Preservation for the anniversary.

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People line up to visit the pavilion during its anniversary last spring.

That June, Katz secured $5.8 million in funding to begin the restoration process. Part of that effort has included preliminary test runs of LED display lights for the pavilion’s observation decks on Feb. 27 and one scheduled for Tuesday night.

These increased efforts added to the narrative of the documentary, with Silva choosing to end the film with the opening of the pavilion on the anniversary.

“I could have never imagined that [the opening] could have been a part of the film when I set out to do the film,” he said.

Silva was also inspired to do more to help the pavilion’s preservation efforts while filming and co-founded the advocacy group People for the Pavilion in May 2013.

The efforts of individuals and groups like his own, such as the New York State Pavilion Paint Project, a volunteer organization dedicated to maintaining the structure through painting and other upkeep projects, are highlighted in his documentary.

Silva is hoping to incorporate some of those who contributed to its history and took part in the film at a Q&A with nonprofit documentation and conservation organization Docomomo US/New York Tri-State during the premiere — including Albert Fischer, a VIP guide at the ’64 fair; Charles Aybar, who worked as a pavilion skate guard; and Bill Cotter, an author and World’s Fair photo archivist.

world's fair 2

New York State Pavilion Paint Project at work.

The film will premiere at 8 p.m. on Friday, May 22, at the Queens Theatre, which was once part of the one of three structures, designed by Johnson along with the Tent of Tomorrow and observation towers, to comprise the pavilion. For now, the May screening is the only one scheduled, but Silva said more are in the works.

“I hope [the film] helps perpetuate understanding and get more people interested in the building that can bring more positive growth and renewal to the park and to Queens,” he said.

For tickets and more information about the premiere, visit https://web.ovationtix.com/trs/pe.c/9994545. To learn more about the film, visit www.aquarelapictures.com.

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Four busted for drifting at Flushing Meadows Corona Park


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

CarDashboardH0507_M_150_B_R

They may have been “Fast and Furious,” but four daredevil drivers ripping through a Queens park weren’t fast enough to escape from the police.

Four men were arrested for what officials describe as “movie-style stunt” performances in a parking lot at Flushing Meadows Corona Park, according to the district attorney’s office.

“Cars are not toys. Driving at high speeds and intentionally skidding a roughly 3,000-pound vehicle, especially where spectators are gathered, is dangerous and can result in tragedy,” District Attorney Richard Brown said. “Following a number of noise complaints from neighborhood residents, the police responded and shut down this illegal and potentially deadly activity. The vehicles have been seized and the drivers have been charged.”

The men used modified vehicles for drifting, a style of driving made popular by the “The Fast and the Furious” movies that combines high speeds and dangerous turns.

Spectators would watch these stunts, where the cars would sometimes allegedly strike other vehicles and stationary objects in the park’s parking lot, the district attorney said.

The four were busted after area residents called 311 to complain about the excessive noise. In total, 66 calls were received, and none have been logged in the neighborhood in the more than five weeks since the men were arrested.

Kareem Ali, 26, and Michael Mahabir, 27, both of Richmond Hill, Joel Santiago, 36, of Maspeth, and Darren Tang, 24, of Manhattan, were arraigned on Oct. 26 on charges of reckless endangerment, reckless driving, speed contests and races and failure to comply with directions, prosecutors said. Ali is also charged with unlawful possession of marijuana. The men, who face up to a year in jail if convicted, were released on their own recognizance.

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Elmhurst woman writes Queens walking tour book


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Image courtesy of Adrienne Onofri

One Elmhurst woman is hoping her new book will help readers step out their doors and take a stroll while exploring all that Queens has to offer.

Adrienne Onofri is the author behind “Walking Queens,” a new book that features 30 detailed walking tours through the borough exploring architecture, distinct cultures in different neighborhoods, historical landmarks, celebrity homes and natural scenery.

“There are one or two books about neighborhoods in Queens but really no guide book completely dedicated to Queens,” Onofri said. 

The opportunity to write this book came after Onofri, a licensed New York City sightseeing guide, wrote “Walking Brooklyn: 30 Tours Exploring Historical Legacies.” 

Her publisher became interested in doing a version for Queens, and Onofri said she jumped at the idea because a lot of people had asked her to write a walking tour book for the borough she has called home for decades.

“I liked the idea because I can say I live in Queens,” Onofri said. 

To compile the book, which took about a year to finish, Onofri traveled the borough on nothing but her two legs and public transportation. She sketched out routes based on what she already had in mind or knew she wanted to include. Other locations, she said, she roamed and discovered in order to create the detailed walks. 

“There are a lot of people that drive around and don’t get around in public transportation much,” Onofri said. “[The book] is just encouraging them to go a few neighborhoods over, which they would normally drive pass on the highway.”

The neighborhoods featured in the book go from Long Island City and Astoria all the way to Howard Beach and the Rockaways. Along with these, Onofri also spent time in the borough’s parks such as Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Alley Pond Park and Rockaway Park. 

The book, with photographs taken by the author, includes maps of the area that will be walked, nearby trains or buses, points of interest in the neighborhood, historical facts and detailed directions of how to get around. 

Part of the Hunters Point Historic District on 45th Ave. in Long Island City (Photo by  Adrienne Onofri)

Part of the Hunters Point Historic District on 45th Ave. in Long Island City (Photo by Adrienne Onofri)

“There are things you walk past and don’t notice,” Onofri said. “This book has the discoveries of things that you might not take the time to notice regularly.”

While working on the book, Onofri said she realized there were instances where she noticed things she hadn’t before. Also, one of the issues was trying to fit as much as she could in the 254-page book, with some things just not being able to be included. 

“There was a lot of stuff to learn, whether it was just some place I had been only a couple of times or a place I really didn’t know much about before,” she said. 

Onofri said she is still conducting tours in Manhattan, Brooklyn and Queens. 

To contact Onofri to schedule a tour, email walkingqueens@gmail.com.

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First phase renovation of former World’s Fair office building complete


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Renderings courtesy of BKSK Architects 

The revitalization of a World’s Fair relic is nearing completion, and it’s not the New York State Pavilion.

The first phase of renovation and expansion of the Olmsted Center in Flushing Meadows Corona Park has concluded, BKSK Architects announced on Thursday.

Aside from revitalizing the building, which was constructed in 1964 and used as temporary offices for Robert Moses and the World’s Fair Corporation staff during the colossal event, the project includes a new 10,000-square-foot addition.

The addition features distinctive exposed steel to honor the original design of the building. The renovated structure includes Kebony wood for the walkways, complimented by steel railings and stainless steel cabling.

“One of the chief goals of this project has been to create an indoor workplace environment that strengthens the connection between agency staff and the parks they serve throughout the city,” said BKSK partner-in-charge Joan Krevlin. “We sought design opportunities that heighten awareness of the park landscape beyond their windows.”


The Parks Department’s Capital Projects Division currently uses the Olmsted Center, and now has several new offices, a new meeting room and a new public procurement and bidding room with the revitalization.

The first phase of construction also included new siding to improve the center’s resistance to weather, and reconfiguration of the interior to accommodate employees and people with disabilities.

Inspired by the effects of Superstorm Sandy, the second phase of the project will technologically enhance the building and resolve flooding problems with a new water channel system to lead water into bioswales that will contain and absorb it.

The second phase will commence in early 2015.

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Queens Museum, Parks Dept. ask communities to redesign Flushing Meadows


| ejankiewicz@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Cristabelle Tumola

What will Flushing Meadows Corona Park look like in the future? The Queens Museum and the Parks Department are asking members of communities around the park to come up with ideas and solutions to make the green space more accessible to local communities.

“This is a bit of an experiment,” said Jose Serrano, the museum’s community organizer. “Instead of having people give us their ideas in some kind of meeting, we asked, why don’t we equip them with the tools to improve the park creatively and practically.”

Serrano and the Parks Department are asking the public to submit ideas on how to improve the parks connection and the way it’s used with the surrounding neighborhoods.

The deadline is Oct. 25 and 20 people will be chosen to create an exhibition project that will be shown next year at the museum. Over the course of a year, the 20 selected people will learn more about the park and its pros and cons through a series of hands-on learning events.

Serrano said that they will be only accepting people from communities like Flushing, Corona and Forest Hills because they are directly connected to the park.

“They’re meant to be community designs,” he said. “And we want to give people the confidence to talk to decision makers.”

At the museum’s exhibition, the community members will present their ideas to these “decision makers” and, Serrano hopes, affect change in how the park can be changed.

The park was created for the 1939-40 Worlds Fair and as a fair ground, Serrano said, it is designed to control who enters the area. But now, as a public park, a design for controlling fare-goers no longer makes sense.

“The park will be changed to make it more open to people,” Serrano said. “Can we put the community’s signature on the solutions?”

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Real estate roundup: 5Pointz demolition progress


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Photos courtesy of Jeremiah's Vanishing New York

5Pointz Falling

“You can see the destruction as you roll past on the 7 Train, looking down into rubble. And get a closer look on the ground, through a grimy plastic window in the plywood demolition fence.” Read more [Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York]

5Pointz Demo

Queens’ ‘Forgotten River’ Looks Ahead to Cleanup and Change

“The 12th hole of the Pitch ‘N Putt Golf Course in Flushing Meadows Park might seem like an odd place to contemplate the future of New York City’s coastline. But if you stand there long enough, you might begin to see things.” Read more [Curbed]

New Ozone Park Public School Set to Open in Sept. 2017

“The city School Construction Authority indicated last week that the new public school designated to be built on an empty lot in Ozone Park is approximately 60 percent of the way through the design phase.” Read more [The Forum] 

Real estate roundup: $750M College Point Police Academy delayed again, Meadow Lake to get cleanup


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Rendering courtesy of the NYPD

New $750 million NYPD Police Academy in Queens faces another setback with defective gym floor

“Cadets attending the NYPD’s new multimillion-dollar Police Academy in Queens may be asked to participate in a new physical fitness regimen — ripping out the broken gym floor.

“A state-of-the-art polyurethane floor recently installed in the soon-to-be opened $750 million NYPD training ground in College Point has already began to warp and buckle and will need to be torn out and replaced — possibly delaying the facility’s opening, police officials confirmed Friday.” Read more [The New York Daily News]

Long neglected, lakes and ponds in city parks will get some attention

“It is the largest lake in New York City, a historic salt marsh that was flooded when Flushing Meadows-Corona Park was fashioned from a former ash dump to host the 1939 World’s Fair.

“But while years of effort and millions of dollars have gone toward cleaning up the city’s major waterways, like the Hudson and Bronx Rivers, city officials and parks advocates have paid less attention to Meadow Lake and the four dozen other lakes and ponds scattered across the parkland.” Read more [The New York Times]

5 factors that could impact Chinese property investment in NYC

“As Chinese property developers and investors look to generate bigger profits by looking beyond their local markets, questions have arisen about what’s actually driving the influx of cash – and what could slow the flow.” Read more [The Real Deal]

Armed robber stole more than $4K from Queens Zoo: NYPD  


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photo by Julie Larsen Maher © WCS

Police are looking for a suspect who held up two employees at the Queens Zoo Sunday afternoon, taking off with thousands in cash.

The armed robbery, first reported by NYC Park Advocates, happened around 4:30 p.m., an hour before closing at the Flushing Meadows Corona Park zoo, according to authorities. The suspect allegedly came up to two zoo workers, a 56-year-old woman and an 18-year-old man, and displayed a gun.

He then pointed the weapon at the woman while the other employee filled a bag with $4,873, cops said. The suspect then fled.

Authorities describe the suspect as Hispanic, around 30 years old, 5 feet 9 inches tall and 150 pounds.

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Cosmos players teach kids soccer in Flushing Meadows Corona Park  


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Photos courtesy of New York Cosmos

BY ASHA MAHADEVAN

More than 50 children had an exciting time as they kicked a ball around with New York Cosmos players at Flushing Meadows Corona Park on Tuesday. The children, between the ages of six and 14, were participating in the second of five free Back to School clinics organized by the soccer team and led by their coaches and players.

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Sporting the free green Cosmos T-shirt that they received, the children interacted with players David Diosa and Sebastian Guenzatti. Several of the children participating in the clinic were part of the nonprofit organization Hour Children that works with incarcerated and formerly incarcerated women and their children to help them successfully rejoin the community.

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Cosmos Chief Operating Officer Erik Stover said that his organization is committed to developing grassroots soccer. “Providing local kids with the opportunity to learn from our coaches and players is just one of the many ways in which we can continue to give back to the community,” he said.

Every child who attended the clinic also received a free voucher which will allow them and one adult chaperone entry to any one of the Cosmos’ final four home matches of the NASL Fall Season.

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The clinic heads to Brooklyn on Sept. 16 and returns to the Cosmos’ training pitch Mitchel Field in Hempstead, Long Island on Sept. 17. Space is limited; preregister at www.nycosmostdp.com.

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