Tag Archives: Flushing-Main Street

Falling debris causes disruptions on the 7 line in Flushing

| agiudice@ridgewoodtimes.com

Photo via Twitter/@NYPD109Pct

Watch out below!

Service on the 7 line was disrupted Saturday afternoon due to a construction accident when a crane hoisting construction materials to stores’ rooftops broke and spilled its cargo onto the tracks at Roosevelt Avenue and College Point Boulevard in Flushing.

The incident took place at about 1 p.m. on Saturday afternoon, when the falling debris caused smoke and a small fire to spark on the tracks, according to reports.

Service was suspended between Roosevelt Avenue and Mets-Willets Point for several hours during the afternoon as crews worked to remove the debris from the tracks and are conducting an investigation for any damage.

Though train service was running normally by 7 p.m., with a Mets game scheduled at Citi Field, the team advised fans on Twitter hours before the game to allow additional travel time and use alternate means.


MTA will boost service on 7, L and M lines later this year

| rpozarycki@queenscourier.com

File photo

With overall subway ridership up 2.6 percent across the city, the MTA is set to meet the increased demand by boosting service on three local subway lines this December.

Most of the changes will take place during off-peak hours, as the MTA reported ridership between or after rush hour periods reached its highest rate in 65 years in 2014, with more than 1.75 billion riders systemwide.

The biggest boost will take place on the L line, with seven additional round trips added between 10:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. on weekdays. Ridership on the L line — which services Ridgewood and Bushwick — grew 4.7 percent last year, the largest increase of any line in the system.

According to the MTA, the seven additional trains will reduce wait times on the L line to five minutes between the morning and evening rush hours. Last fall, the MTA similarly enhanced L train service during weeknight and weekend periods.

The MTA will also introduce two additional round trips on the 7 line — which services the rapidly-growing neighborhoods of Long Island City, Sunnyside, Woodside and Flushing — between 8 and 10:20 p.m. on weeknights. The agency said this will reduce wait times to under 4 1/2 minutes.

This service increase is expected to ease commuting, in particular, out of the Vernon Boulevard-Jackson Avenue station in Long Island City, which experienced a 12 percent growth in weekday ridership in 2014; and at the Flushing-Main Street terminal, which averages about 60,000 riders each day.

Finally, the M line will get an extra round trip just after the morning rush hour, between 9 and 9:30 a.m., reducing wait times to an average of 7 1/2 minutes. Since the line was rerouted in 2010 through Midtown Manhattan and northwest Queens (replacing the defunct V line), M train ridership is up about 31 percent, with an average increase of 6.2 percent at stations between Metropolitan Avenue in Middle Village and Marcy Avenue in Williamsburg.

“New York is a dynamic city and it continues to grow as new or better housing options become available and more people come here for jobs or school,” said MTA New York City Transit President Carmen Bianco. “By making these schedule changes, New York City Transit is making the most of its resources to deliver service that accurately reflects ridership in growing areas.”

The MTA plans to spend $1.6 million to implement the additional service.


Train fatally strikes man at Flushing LIRR station

By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of the 109 precinct via Twitter

Updated Thursday, Feb. 12, 11:27 a.m.


A person was struck and killed by an LIRR train at the Flushing–Main Street station on Wednesday, temporarily suspending service on the Port Washington branch during the evening rush, MTA officials said.

The 38-year-old victim, who was from Mahopac in Putnam County, was on the tracks and holding onto the platform, but apparently made no effort to move when the train came toward him, a witness said, according to an MTA spokeswoman.

Service was suspended on the entire branch from about 4:40 p.m. until just after 6 p.m. Delays and cancellations continued as the line operated on a single track for the next hour.


Suspect punches, steals phone from 15-year-old on Queens subway

| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of NYPD

Cops are looking for a suspect who swiped an iPhone from a teen boy before punching him on a Queens subway train last month.

The robbery took place about 3:30 p.m. on Feb. 27 aboard a southbound No. 7 train at the Flushing-Main Street station, police said.

The suspect approached the 15-year-old, grabbed the cell phone from his hand, punched him in the face and fled, officials said.

Anyone with information is asked to call Crime Stoppers at (800) 577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the Crime Stoppers website or can text their tips to CRIMES (274637), then enter TIP577. All calls are strictly confidential.



NYC subway, bus ridership highest in over 60 years

By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

File photo


Total ridership for New York City Transit buses and trains are at their highest in more than 60 years, according to the MTA’s 2012 Ridership data report.

Total annual ridership increased 0.9 percent from 2011, despite a five day span of no service and free fares following Sandy.

Weekend ridership increased 3 percent from 2011, matching its highest ever level achieved back in 1946. Weekday ridership increased 1.8 percent, excluding the five day disruption following Sandy, from 2011, reaching its highest level since 1950.

According to the report, the busiest station in Queens was the Flushing-Main Street stop for the No. 7 train.

For specific data on ridership in different boroughs and stations, click here.



MTA removes trash cans from more subway stations

| ctumola@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER / Photo by Cristabelle Tumola

An MTA pilot program that removed trash cans from two subway stations — one in Queens and one in Manhattan — to help alleviate garbage problems such as rodents and track fires has been extended to eight more stations.

Last fall, trash cans were removed from the Flushing-Main Street No. 7 line and Manhattan 8th Street “R” line stations. After positive results from those two locations, the MTA decided to add two stations each in Queens, Brooklyn, the Bronx and Manhattan to the pilot for six more months, starting on September 2.

In Queens, these include the “A” line’s 111th Street stop and the 65th Street station of the “M/R” line.

According to the transit agency, the cans removed last year reduced the number of trash bags by 67 percent at Main Street and 50 percent at 8th Street. Also, the stations were cleaner and there wasn’t an increase in track fires.

“After removing the trash cans at the initial pilot stations, customers for the most part took their trash with them,” said MTA spokesperson Kevin Ortiz.

Each year, NYC Transit removes about 14,000 tons of trash from the subway, said the agency. Despite more frequent bag removal, reinforced trash storage rooms and temper-proof cans, garbage still piles up, attracting rats and landing on train tracks, causing fires.

Commuters heading to work and the free papers handed out at subway stops may be a large part of the trash, according to a 2008 analysis of about 75,000 pounds of subway station garbage, which showed that the most common item thrown out at subway stations was newspapers, at 44 percent.

Though trash is an issue, a 2011 Straphangers Campaign subway platform survey found that garbage was not the biggest problem at subway stations. Observing 250 subway platforms, surveyors only saw one overflowing trash can and 15 garbage bags; rats were found on 11 percent of platforms. Problems such as broken lighting fixtures, substantial water damage and peeling paint were found at 50 to 79 percent of platforms.