Tag Archives: Flushing Library

Queens’ Morning Roundup


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

TODAY’S FORECAST

Tuesday: Overcast with a chance of a thunderstorm and a chance of rain, then a chance of a thunderstorm and rain showers in the afternoon. High of 79. Breezy. Winds from the SW at 10 to 20 mph. Chance of rain 60%. Tuesday night: Partly cloudy with a chance of rain. Low of 64. Winds from the WNW at 10 to 15 mph. Chance of rain 50%.

EVENT OF THE DAY: A Mouse in the City: A Puppet Musical of ‘Ginormouse’ Proportions

Starting at 4 p.m. children ages 3-13 years old can enjoy a performance of “A Mouse in the City: A Puppet Musical of ‘Ginormouse’ Proportions.” The show follows the tale of a mouse on his journey to the big city. Taking place at the Flushing Library at 41-17 Main Street. Click here for more info or to submit an event of your own

Father and son attacked by pit bull mix

A father and son were viciously attacked by a pit bull mix in Queens. Read more: ABC New York

Huntley: I’m still AG Schneiderman’s target even though I’m prison-bound

Former state Sen. Shirley Huntley may be headed to federal prison, but she claims state Attorney General Eric Schneiderman isn’t through with her yet. Read more: New York Daily News 

New York City soda ban appeal heads to court Tuesday

The next step in the not-so-sweet battle over New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s war against obesity moves to a state appellate court Tuesday. Read more: AP

Sleeping guards at JFK raise major red flags about security

Protecting some of the world’s most strategically important sites in the New York area – including the airports, bridges and the new World Trade Center and memorial site – is a matter of vital concern and large sums of money. Read more: CBS New York

Scientists warn of larger flood zone, extreme heat for NYC

The projections paint an unsettling picture of New York’s future: A city where by the 2050s, 800,000 people could be living in a flood zone that would cover a quarter of the land, and there are as many 90-degree days as is now normal for Birmingham, Ala. Read more: AP

Federal government to comply with order allowing morning after pill for all ages

The federal government on Monday told a judge in Brooklyn that it will reverse course, and take steps to comply with his order to allow girls of any age to buy emergency contraception without prescriptions. Read more: CBS New York/AP

Queens’ Morning Roundup


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

TODAY’S FORECAST

Wednesday: Overcast in the morning, then mostly cloudy. High of 64. Winds from the NNE at 5 to 10 mph. Wednesday night: Mostly cloudy. Low of 50. Winds from the SE at 5 to 10 mph.

EVENT OF THE DAY: “Every Day Is a Holiday” 

Starting at 6 p.m., come view the film “Every Day is a Holiday” at the Flushing Library. Join filmmaker Theresa Loong for a discussion and screening of her film (in English with Chinese subtitles) that tells the story of a Chinese prisoner of war, taken by the Japanese, and his quest to become a United States citizen. Click here for more info or to submit an event of your own

Bombs used in Boston Marathon attack said to be made from pressure cookers

One of the explosive devices used in the bombings of the Boston Marathon appeared to have been in a metal pressure cooker packed with nails and ball bearings, CBS News reported. Read more: CBS New York/AP

John Liu campaign fund-raisers begin corruption conspiracy trial

The conspiracy trial of two allies to mayoral hopeful John Liu opened Tuesday with federal prosecutors casting the pair as crooks bent on skirting campaign finance laws. Read more: New York Daily News

Over 5,000 register for NYC bike sharing program

New York City’s Department of Transportation says more than 5,000 people have registered this week for a bike-sharing program that launches in May. Read more: Fox New York/AP

JFK Airport finch pincher Marlon Hariram gets 6 months in prison

A birdbrained smuggler nabbed at Kennedy Airport with nine singing finches from Guyana hidden up his sleeve was sentenced Tuesday to six months in prison. Read more: New York Daily News

Cuomo holds steady in poll but fares poorly on corruption

Gov. Cuomo can exhale. A new poll shows his job approval ratings held steady between March and April after dropping since he signed New York’s controversial new gun control law in January. Read more: New York Post

Pat Summerall voice of NFL dies at 82

Pat Summerall, the NFL player-turned-broadcaster whose deep, resonate voice called games for more than 40 years, has died at the age of 82. Read more: ABC New York/AP

Queens’ Morning Roundup


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

TODAY’S FORECAST

Thursday: Mostly cloudy. High of 34F with a windchill as low as 16. Winds from the East at 5 to 10 mph. Thursday night: Overcast with a chance of snow, then snow after midnight. Low of 30 with a windchill as low as 23. Winds from the SE at 5 to 10 mph. Chance of snow 80%.

EVENT OF THE DAY: Peking Operas 

Celebrate the Chinese Lunar New Year with arias and episodes from two famous Peking Operas, Filial Visit of the Fourth Son and Henpecked King, presented by the New York Chinese Opera Society at the Flushing Libary . Free. Click here for more info or to submit an event of your own

NYC looking at 4-8 inches of snow, points north and east much more Friday

Forecasters say a nor’easter slated to hit Friday could dump large amounts of rain and snow across the Tri-State Area. Read more: CBS New York

No new date for NYC primaries after Albany lawmakers nix June, August proposals

Albany lawmakers are unable to agree on an earlier date for the New York City primaries, even after the city Board of Elections has sounded the alarm about the potential for chaos if the elections are held as scheduled in September. Read more: NBC New York

Man expected to plead guilty in alleged Federal Reserve bomb plot

A 21-year-old Bangladesh national is expected to appear in a federal court in Brooklyn Thursday to plead guilty to trying to blow up the Federal Reserve. Read more: NY1

NYC first to get realistic shooting simulation game for kids

A shooting simulation game that lets children pretend to have shootouts in an indoor fake village with a bank, offices and what appears to be a school has come to Queens and is raising concern among law enforcement authorities. Read more: NBC New York

Three unions back MLS soccer stadium project for Flushing Meadows-Corona Park

A trio of unions is throwing their weight behind a contentious proposal to construct a soccer stadium in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, the Daily News has learned. Read more: New York Daily News

Subway safety campaign features bloody MetroCards

Shocking MetroCards splattered with blood and the grim reaper are being handed out in an effort to get your attention. Read more: ABC New York

Brennan to face questions on interrogations, drones and leaks

President Barack Obama’s nominee to head the CIA, John Brennan, is expected to face tough questioning about leaks of sensitive information and U.S. spy activities from waterboarding to the use of drones when he appears at a Senate confirmation hearing on Thursday. Read more: Reuters

 

What to do this weekend in Queens


| MKirk@queenscourier.com

SATURDAY, JANUARY 12

At 10:30 a.m., Alley Pond Environmental Center, located at 22806 Northern Boulevard, Flushing, will be holding an event titled “Young Chefs,” which invites kids to prepare homemade grilled cheese sandwiches and fresh banana split milkshakes. All materials will be included. Space is limited to eight participants and registration is required. Recommended for ages 7-12. Admission is $24 for non-members and $18 for members. For more information, call 718-229-4000, email contact@alleypond.com or visit alleypond.com.

At 2 p.m., Flushing Library, located at 41-17 Main Street, Flushing, presents the first part of the three-part Twilight Concert series, where Members of the Con Brio Ensemble will perform works by Brahms, Poulenc, Handel and others. The Ensemble is made up of critically acclaimed musicians, including violinist Alexander Meshibovsky, pianist Diana Mittler, oboist Alan Hollander and vocalist Barbara Ann Martin. Admission is $12 and $10 for students and senior citizens. TDF vouchers will be accepted. For more information, call 718-661-1200.

At 6 p.m., Dance Fusion, at 40-04 Junction Boulevard in Jackson Heights invites you to party your way into fi tness and the New Year with Zumba! Join us for an exciting and fun class taught by a licensed and experienced instructor. Even those who have never experienced this exciting new way to work out will love it! Classes are $10 per session.

With shows beginning at 6 p.m. and 8 p.m., The Chocolate Factory, located at 5-49 49th Avenue, Long Island City, presents “There There,” an unpredictable and moving play about being the  wrong person in the wrong place at the wrong time doing all the wrong things. For tickets and for more information, visit chocolatefactorytheater.org or call 212-352-3101.

SUNDAY, JANUARY 13

At 10 a.m., Queens Botanical Garden, located at 43-50 Main Street, Flushing, will be holding an electronic waste recycling event. Bring your unwanted or broken electronics such as old phones, chargers, handheld toys, TVs, cameras, holiday lights and more and they will be disposed free of charge. All participants will also have a chance to enter a free raffle to win a new 21-inch iMac and will also receive a “Green Karma” coupon worth anywhere from $5 to $500, redeemable at the Tekserve store. For more information, contact Darcy Hector at 718-886-3800 or dhector@queensbotanical.org.

At 2 p.m., Bayside Historical Society, located at 208 Totten Avenue, Fort Totten, Bayside, will be holding its Annual Art Show 2013. The event will also include a performance by Lindsay Megiddo. Those interested in submitting original works are encouraged to view an information packet and complete a registration form, both of which can be accessed at baysidehistorical.org on the Events page. For more information, call 718-352-1548 or visit baysidehistorical.org.

At 2:15 p.m., Flushing Town Hall presents New York City’s preeminent ambassadors of Afro-Puerto Rican Bomba and Plena music and dance. Lead by National Heritage winner Juan Gutirrez, this unique troupe of Puerto Rican master traditional artists and seasoned New York musicians are leaders in the resurgence of the Island’s traditional music in NY. Tickets are $12/$10 members/$8 children/$6 member children. Flushing Town Hall is located at 137-35 Northern Boulevard. To learn more, call 718- 463-7700.

At 4:30 p.m., Church-In-the-Gardens, located at 50 Ascan Avenue, Forest Hills, presents the second part of the three-part Twilight Concert series, where Members of the Con Brio Ensemble will perform works by Brahms, Poulenc, Handel and others. The Ensemble is made up of critically acclaimed musicians, including violinist Alexander Meshibovsky, pianist Diana Mittler, oboist Alan Hollander and vocalist Barbara Ann Martin. Admission is $12 and $10 for students and senior citizens. TDF vouchers will be accepted. For more information, call 718-268-6704.

ONGOING THRU SATURDAY, JANUARY 26

The Secret Theatre, located at 4402 23rd Street, Long Island City, presents “Urinetown, the Musical,” a Tony-Award-winning production set in a dystopian city where a water shortage has forced private toilets to be outlawed. Out of the residents who are furious over the fact that they have to share public facilities, a hero rises to lead them through a comedic, music-infused revolution. Evening shows Thursday through Saturday are at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 7 p.m., with a special matinee performance on January 26 at 3 p.m. For more information, contact Alyssa Van Gorder at 718-392-0722 or pr@secrettheatre.com.

ONGOING THRU WEDNESDAY, MAY 1

The Louis Armstrong House Museum, located at 34-56 107th Street, Corona, presents its Louis Armstrong at Freedomland exhibit. The exhibit, curated by Louis Armstrong House Museum Archivist Ricky Riccardi, paints an intimate portrait of Armstrong on stage and off during the turbulent years of 1961 to 1964, spreading joy to fans young and old with his integrated band of all stars. Major funding for the exhibit is made possible by the Louis Armstrong Educational Foundation. The museum is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday through Sunday and closed on Mondays. Admission is $10 for adults; $7 for seniors 65 and older, students and children and free for members and children under four. A $6 group rate is available for groups of at least eight, in which case it is asked that an appointment be made. For more information, call 718-478-8274 or visit louisarmstronghouse.org.

MORE WEEKEND EVENTS

 

Halloween events in Queens


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

File photo

Here’s your guide to all the Halloween happenings in Queens this October.

Pumpkin Patch
Queens County Farm Museum
73-50 Little Neck Parkway, Glen Oaks
Thru October 28
Saturdays & Sundays
11:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

Haunted House at the Poppenhusen

The Poppenhusen Institute
114-04 14th Road College Point
Friday, October 26-Saturday, October 27
Wednesday, October 31
5:00-6:00 p.m. (ages 6-8), 6:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m. (ages 8 and up)

Halloween Haunted House

Queens County Farm Museum
73-50 Little Neck Parkway, Glen Oaks
Friday, October 26 – Sunday, October 28
4:00 p.m.-7:00 p.m.

Children’s Fall Festival
Queens County Farm Museum
73-50 Little Neck Parkway, Glen Oaks
Sunday, October 28
11:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.

Dead or Alive
New York Hall of Science
47-01 111 Street, Corona
Friday, October 26 – Sunday, October 28

Thriller at the Battery
Fort Totten Park
Cross Island Parkway between Totten Avenue and 15 Road
Friday, October 26
6:00 p.m.-8:00 p.m.

Boo at the Zoo
Queens Zoo
53-51 111th Street, Flushing Meadows-Corona Park
Saturday, October 27-Sunday, October 28
11 a.m.-4 p.m.

Halloween Walking Tour
Hell Gate Bridge, Astoria Park (on Shore Boulevard)
Saturday, October 27
11 a.m.

Rockaway Canine Festival
Rockaway Freeway Dog Park
Beach Channel Drive at Beach 84 Street, Rockaway Beach
Saturday, October 27
11 a.m.-1 p.m.

Family Halloweenfest
Jamaica Center for Arts & Learning
161-04 Jamaica Avenue, Jamaica
Saturday, October 27
11 a.m.-4 p.m.

Trick or Treat!
Louis Armstrong House Museum
34-56 107 Street, Corona
Saturday, October 27
1 p.m.-4 p.m.

3rd Annual Halloween Costume Party
Flushing Town Hall
137-35 Northern Boulevard, Flushing
Saturday, October 27
8 p.m.

Bayside Village Halloween Family Festival

Bell Boulevard

between Northern Boulevard and 35th Avenue

Saturday, October 27

Noon-5 p.m.

Halloween-Remixed

Flushing Town Hall
137-35 Northern Boulevard, Flushing
Sunday, October 28
12:00 p.m.

Halloween on Ice
City Ice Pavilion
47-32 32 Place, Long Island City
Sunday, October 28
12:00 pm.-3:50 p.m.

CenterStage Halloween Concert
Sky View Center
40-24 College Point Boulevard, Flushing
Sunday, October 28
3:30 p.m.

Haunted Halloween Hike
Alley Pond Environmental Center
228-06 Northern Boulevard, Douglaston
Monday, October 29
4:30 p.m. (ages 5-7), 6:30 p.m. (ages 8-12)

Shocktoberfest
Playground For All Children
Flushing Meadows-Corona Park
Tuesday, October 30
4:00 p.m.-8:00 p.m.

Queens Zoo Trick & Treating and Halloween Festivities
Queens Zoo
53-51 111th Street, Flushing Meadows-Corona Park
Wednesday, October 31
3:00–5:00 p.m.

Jackson Heights Halloween Parade
Line up near P.S. 222  (87th Street and 37th Avenue)
Wednesday, October 31
5 p.m.

Halloween Party! Devil Science Theater 3K
Laughing Devil Comedy Club
47-38 Vernon Boulevard, Long Island City
Wednesday, October 31
8 p.m.

 

 

After Queens library assault, call for stricter laws


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Maggie Hayes

BY TERENCE M. CULLEN AND MAGGIE HAYES

Police are looking for a suspect who reportedly sexually assaulted a 10-year-old girl at the Pomonok branch of the Queens Library in the middle of the day.

“There are a lot of little children that are in [the library] by themselves,” said a 14-year-old who lives nearby. “You have nobody watching you. Instead you have people like this walking in, doing things and walking out.”

The suspect, described as a Hispanic man in his early to mid-20s, molested the girl around 4 p.m. on Monday, October 15. Police describe the man as 5’10” and 200 pounds, of light complexion with slick black hair pulled back in a bun.
“In this neighborhood, the library is like a babysitter,” said Patricia S., who lives just up the block from the branch on

Jewel Avenue and also frequents the library. “[Kids] run around through the aisles, no one is looking out for them.”
Police could not release any other details at this time, as the investigation is ongoing.

There are several registered sex offenders living within the vicinity of the library, according to the advocacy website Familywatchdog.us.

The teen noted that she has seen younger children get dropped off at the Pomonok branch by their parents or wait there after school to be picked up.

Joanne King, communications director for Queens Libraries, said the system always tries to ensure that everyone who frequents any branch feels safe and in a good environment.

“Queens Libraries are secure, family-friendly environments for education and enrichment,” she said. “The safety of our patrons and staff is always our number one priority.”

While sex offenders are banned from entering playgrounds, courts have ruled it unconstitutional to ban them completely from public libraries.

Just this summer, a man with a history of sexual-related run-ins with the law was arrested for inappropriately touching two young girls outside of the Flushing Library.

Councilmember Peter Vallone and Public Advocate Bill de Blasio as a result wrote letters to state legislators calling for registered sex offenders to at least be banned from the children’s reading rooms of libraries.

Following the Pomonok assault, de Blasio released a statement calling again for tighter laws against known sex offenders in children’s sections of libraries.

“Today in New York City, a sexual predator could walk into a children’s room at any library, and there’s nothing we can do to stop them,” he said. “We need a tougher law that bans convicted offenders from children’s rooms to deter would-be attackers and empower law enforcement to quickly intervene. We intend to work closely with the State Legislature to protect children in our libraries.”

State forum helps build small business in Queens


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Cristabelle Tumola

Established and potential small business owners filled the auditorium of the Flushing Library with pens and paper in hand (and a few laptops), ready to jot down information on ways to help their small businesses.

Around 250 people attended the August 22 event, which was the last in a series of small business forums that have been held throughout the state since early April.

“This program is all about creating jobs because when small businesses do well, New York does well,” said Governor Andrew Cuomo when the initiative was announced. “It’s so important for us to get out of the office and go into communities to see how we can help anyone who wants to start, grow or improve a business and that’s what this program will do.”

At the forum, representatives from the New York Departments of State, Labor, Taxation and Finance as well as Empire State Development, the State Liquor Authority and the Workers Compensation Board each gave a short presentation. Afterwards, attendees were able to ask the speakers questions.

“What [attendees] should take away from this presentation tonight is that we have resources and services that are available to you free of charge,” said New York State Deputy Secretary for Civil Rights Alphonso David, who introduced the night’s speakers.

In addition to small business grants, programs and online resources, the forum also included important information on laws and taxes that could cost small business owners money or even shut down their businesses.

Though the information discussed is easily available online, for several reasons, people might not know about it because they have limited resources, don’t have time to look online or are recent immigrants and have language barriers, said David.

Home to a large number of small businesses and immigrants, Queens, particularly Flushing, was an appropriate place to end the state’s small businesses forums, he said.

“There’s a large group of people here in Queens that operate small businesses and may not be aware of the services that we have to offer.”

Marc Fox of Fresh Meadows attended the forum because he is considering opening a small business in Queens. After working in the music industry for years, he would like open a music center that has rehearsal space and a store and gives lessons.

He was particularly interested in learning more about grants that could help him start his business, but was disappointed.

“The free money doesn’t sound so free,” he said.

But Fox liked that there are programs in place to help people like him. Although the information can be found online, he said, it was much easier hearing it laid out all at once.

Information for NY state small business owners can be found at www.NYOpenforSmallBusiness.com or www.thenewny.com.

 

6th District candidates debate hot-button issues


| mchan@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Melissa Chan

The six 6th District congressional candidates mildly duked it out for the first time during a forum in Flushing — addressing hot-button city, state and national issues, like plans to fix the flailing economy and stances on immigration reform.

The hopefuls — Green Party’s Evergreen Chou, Democratic primary runners Councilmember Elizabeth Crowley, Assemblymember Rory Lancman, Assemblymember Grace Meng and Dr. Robert Mittman, and Republican contender Councilmember Dan Halloran — split the roughly two-hour meeting, held at Flushing Library on May 21, to introduce themselves and explain the platforms for which they are running.

Each lauded his or her experience, with the elected officials pointing to their plans on advocating for the middle class and improving education, Social Security and the job market, while the two citizen candidates — Chou and Mittman — respectively pushed for peace and change.

The forum was hosted by the MinKwon Center for Community Action. The congressional contenders remained civil, with minor disagreements stemming mostly from the differences between Republican and Democratic philosophies on the economy.

Halloran said the key to reviving the economy and creating jobs is making sure the government “stays out of the way of businesses.” Citing that 98 percent of small businesses in New York have disappeared between 1840 and 2011, he said government should decrease the number of agencies businesses are held accountable to, re-evaluate its tax roles to make sure businesses that are job creators aren’t overtaxed and give incentives to businesses to hire more employees.

Lancman respectfully disagreed, saying deregulating government led to the Wall Street meltdown. He said Wall Street first needs to be reformed — “making it an engine of economic growth, not a potential minefield that could blow up the economy once again” — and small businesses should be provided support and access to credit.

Meng took a different approach and said she believes improving mass transit, highways, roads and bridges would help increase jobs for Queens residents. She also said maintaining “better and closer” partnerships with universities and hospitals would help make Queens a “technology hub” and would stem job growth.

Chou said building more hospitals and engaging in government programs would revive the economy, while Crowley said pulling government spending on Afghanistan would give the country more money to use. Mittman backed Halloran, saying government should be limited and small business should not be overtaxed.

Questions on immigration reform and enforcement directly tied into talks about racial discrimination, when candidates addressed the efficiency of Secure Communities — a federal program that prioritizes the removal of criminal aliens and repeat immigration violators — and the recent controversial stop and frisk policy.

Crowley — who said she believes in comprehensive immigration reform — said there is a fine line drawn if the illegal immigrant questioned is not a threat. She said she supported a local law passed in the City Council that prevented the Department of Corrections from imposing immigration detainers “on those that were not convicted of any crime and were not doing anything that was considered a serious crime.”

However, Halloran said “being in the country illegally is a crime” itself.

“You cannot reward someone who came here illegally with citizenship, but you can give them a path to permanent residency,” he said.

According to Halloran, illegal immigrants should fill out paperwork, pay the fees and be checked up on 10 years after they are granted permanent status to see that they are paying their taxes and not engaged in criminal activity. In regards to the stop and frisk policy and concerns of racial profiling, he said there is more of a correlation between economics and socio status than race.

While Lancman agreed people who commit serious crimes should not be welcomed in the country and said he is for comprehensive immigration reform, he said Secure Communities became “a mechanism for detaining and deporting” mostly law-abiding citizens and “created an atmosphere of fear and mistrust in immigrant communities.”

All six candidates opposed using local law enforcement to deal with immigration issues and said the role should lie in the federal government. They each also expressed support for pulling U.S. troops from overseas — however Halloran and Lancman raised serious concerns over whether or not doing so would gravely impact national security.

Crowley was recently endorsed by the Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association, International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 3 and New York City Building and Construction Trades Council, while Meng picked up support from ATU Local No. 1056 and Lancman from the New York State Public Employees Federation.