Tag Archives: Far Rockaway

NYC pilot to extend school day for sixth graders


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photo by Johann Hamilton

The last bell will ring two and a half hours later for 2,000 of the city’s sixth graders starting this fall.

A pilot program will provide additional literacy training at 20 middle schools with high-needs students, including five in Queens, according to the Department of Education (DOE).

The schools are also part of a 40-school expansion of the Middle School Quality Initiative (MSQI), which provides extensive literary instruction in grades six through eight.

“We are committed to ensuring that all students are prepared for college and 21st century careers, and the Middle School Quality Initiative has been central to this mission,” said Schools Chancellor Dennis Walcott.

The Queens schools participating in the pilot are P.S./I.S. 116 William C. Hughley in Jamaica, Waterside School for Leadership in Rockaway, P.S. 043 in Far Rockaway, Queens United Middle School in Springfield Gardens and Village Academy in Far Rockaway.

The $6.2 million for the MSQI expansion comes from the City Council and DOE along with contributions from the Robin Hood Foundation, a nonprofit that helps fight poverty, and other groups.

“We are confident that a daily dose of extra tutoring for students struggling with English language arts will significantly increase students’ ability to comprehend at [their] grade level across all subjects,” said City Council Speaker Christine Quinn.

However, Patricia Simmons, a school aid at P.S./I.S. 116, believes money can be allocated in better ways.

“If they’d just give the schools the supplies they need, then they wouldn’t need to extend the time,” she said. “So many classes don’t have enough textbooks or workbooks.”

Another faculty member was concerned about the age of the students in the program.

“For the little kids, it’ll be too much, but the older ones will be able to handle it,” said a teacher who wanted to remain anonymous.

Tedric Simpson, a former student, also agreed the pilot might be taxing on the sixth graders.

“It’s too much school for one day. They could maybe do it from Monday to Wednesday, but not every day,” she said.

For parents, the benefit went beyond learning.

“Some parents can’t afford babysitters, so the extra hours could be good for them,” said Jean Elie.

With additional reporting by Johann Hamilton

 

RECOMMENDED STORIES

 

Far Rockaway nursing home director arrested for covering up disappearance of resident


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

handcuffs-with-color-web-size1111111111

A former director at a Far Rockaway nursing home has been arrested for falsifying records to cover up the disappearance of a resident with dementia, announced Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman.

Juliet Clifford, 43, of Mount Vernon, NY, has been charged with endangering the welfare of an incompetent or physically disabled person, falsifying business records and willful violation of the health laws.  If found guilty, she could face up to four years in prison.

According to the criminal complaint, said Schneiderman, Clifford neglected to call 9-1-1- when 74-year-old resident Alan Frazer went missing from the Bishop Charles Waldo MacLean Episcopal Nursing Home on May 26.

She covered up his disappearance by telling investigators that he left “against medical advise” (AMA), and refused their requests to report him missing.

The day after his disappearance Clifford allegedly removed information from his medical records, ordered a staff member to state in Frazer’s records that he left AMA and told staff members not to call police, according to the attorney general.

Frazer was eventually reported missing by the nursing facility on May 30, but has still not been found.

Anyone with any information on the whereabouts of Alan Frazer is asked to call 1-800-346-3543:

Missing From: Far Rockaway
New York Date Missing: 5/26/2013
DOB: 7/21/1938 |
Race: Black
Sex: Male
Eyes: Brown
Hair: Gray
Weight: 150 lbs.
Height: 5’8″
Other Information: Alan is a missing vulnerable adult with dementia and high blood pressure and may be in need of medical attention. He was last seen on Brookhaven Avenue and may have travelled to the Bronx. Alan was last seen wearing a blue jacket, blue jeans, sneakers and a white cap.
Investigating Agency: New York City Police Department

 

RECOMMENDED STORIES

Far Rockaway basketball tournament aims to stop violence


| mhayes@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Maggie Hayes

Far Rockaway is fighting its reputation of violence through a program that brings youth together and puts them under one roof.

The Stack Bundles basketball tournament kicked of its second year earlier this month and will continue through the summer. Twelve teams of 10 players each are traveling the peninsula and breaking territorial barriers. All the athletes are age 18 and over.

“We want to spread the word so these kids get it. Right now, they don’t get it,” said tournament founder Manny Fiallo, who is also outreach coordinator for the Police Athletic League (PAL) in Far Rockaway and a parent coordinator at the Department of Education (DOE).

Fiallo said that in Far Rockaway, people get very protective of their respective areas.

“If you’re from Edgemere, why can’t you go to Redfern?” he said. “We want to bring everybody together.”

Last year, Fiallo got the idea of creating something to “represent the neighborhood, something everyone could look forward to,” according to Fiallo’s partner Lakia Echols.

Stack Bundles was a rapper who lived in Redfern and died from gun violence. Fiallo said the Bundles name is well respected around the peninsula, so he called on it for a stop-the-violence effort and created the tournament.

“It’s great competition,” said returning player David Bostick. “It gives us a reason to do something good for the neighborhood.”

“Plus, it’s bragging rights,” he added.

When the second week for the tournament began, over 100 people from the neighborhood came to watch. Community members from toddlers to seniors were in the audience cheering on the players.

“A lot of kids came out and watched us play,” Bostick said. “After school, kids don’t necessarily have something to do. This gets them off the street.”
Bostick added that it is beneficial for younger kids to see older guys from different areas getting along.

At the tournament, youths affected by violence spoke to the audience and opened up about their experiences. People who lost their parents shared their stories and received support from people all over the peninsula.

Echols said once he and Fiallo have participants at the tournament, they can get their attention and show them the PAL program has job and parent training, too.

Deshawna Thompson-Banrey is a coach at this year’s tournament. She works with Fiallo and said Stack Bundles simply gives people something to do and gets them off the street.

“Right now, they’re doing something productive. This is a safe place,” she said.

The games will continue every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday through the summer.

 

RECOMMENDED STORIES

Queens community comes together to stop the violence


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

QC05162013.pdf - Adobe Acrobat

As politicians at all levels try to combat gun violence through legislation, local groups seeing issues within their communities have taken a grassroots approach to keeping neighborhoods safe.

“Upon my release from prison, I wanted to make sure today’s youth didn’t fall into the same traps that I fell into,” said Lance Feurtado.

He and his brother co-founded the King of Kings, an anti-violence group in southeast Queens. They started the group in 2005, a year after Feurtado was released from prison. Their main goal is to reduce shootings and killings.

Feurtado set his sights on the Redfern Community Houses in Far Rockaway. After a shooting in broad daylight took place there, he hit the ground running.

King of Kings also goes on anti-drug and anti-gang tours to educate young people about the consequences of a violent lifestyle, the hidden dangers of drugs and what to do if you are pulled over by police.

I am “a former drug kingpin. I’m an ex-gang member,” Feurtado said. “We can relate first-hand to what the youth are going through. We lived it, we survived it.”

Feurtado also hosts a series of community events such as an annual “Friends for Life” breakfast.

Reverend Phil Craig is another activist active in the borough. The president of the Queens chapter of the National Action Network hosts youth town halls about violence in the community.

“The children, you can tell they’re dealing with a tug-and-pull situation,” he said. “A lot of their friends are attracted to this violent type of lifestyle. It makes them feel important.”

Craig and others in the chapter work to instill a different type of importance in young people—one where they can see themselves being successful off the streets.

“They can make a difference,” Craig said. “Negativity is contagious, but if we can change it around, the positive could become contagious.”

Craig said a big part of reducing violence among youths is getting parents involved and establishing a balanced household structure—something he said many homes in his area lack.

“There’s a gap they can’t fill at home, and these kids are out running around in the streets to try and fill it,” he said.

Out there, young people get territorial, said Manny Fiallo, the outreach coordinator for the Police Athletic League (PAL) in Far Rockaway. Fiallo is also a parent coordinator at the Department of Education (DOE).

“Kids feel like they can’t go to certain places,” he said. “But it’s one peninsula, it’s one Rockaway.”

Last year, Fiallo worked to put on a basketball tournament in memory of Stack Bundles, a local rapper who he said youths respect. The event was so successful that Fiallo is hosting it again and hopes to make it an annual event. The tournament travels throughout the peninsula. Fiallo said it helps break barriers by putting participants in areas they may not usually travel to.

“It involves the whole community, it’s about the whole community,” he said.

Aside from the tournament, Fiallo’s group has hosted teen job fairs and is trying to get a GED program expanded to accommodate 23- to 28-year-olds.

On summer weekends, Craig and the National Action Network occupy corners and try to get young people off the streets.

“One of the things I’ve observed, at 1 a.m., you have kids walking in the streets in packs. They can’t be more than 13 or 14 years old,” he said.

Organizations like Craig’s are trying to stop the violence once and for all.

“When people know each other, there’s less of a tendency [toward] tension” in the community, Feurtado said.

-BY MAGGIE HAYES & TERENCE M. CULLEN

 

RECOMMENDED STORIES

MTA cuts shuttle service to Sandy-ravaged Rockaways


| tcullen@queenscourier.com

Image courtesy of MTA

Local and citywide leaders say the MTA is throwing the Rockaways under the bus.

Public Advocate Bill de Blasio joined with Assemblymember Phillip Goldfeder and Councilmember Donovan Richards in Far Rockaway on Friday, April 19 to decry the decreased shuttle bus service to the Sandy-affected peninsula.

A train service to the Rockaways last ran on Sunday, October 28 as the city buckled down for the storm, which left rails across Jamaica Bay severely damaged.

Since then, buses have run from the Howard Beach-JFK Station to the peninsula.

But on Monday the MTA cut bus service from 94 to 75 runs per weekday.

De Blasio contrasted the cuts with the transit authority’s new Cannonball train, a streamlined shuttle to the Hamptons. He said people with high incomes would benefit from the new train while low- to middle-income Rockaway residents would suffer from the cost-saving measure.

“The MTA can’t throw the Rockaways under the bus,” he said. “If it can expand service for Manhattanites weekending in the Hamptons, then it can afford to do right by hard-hit families in the Rockaways.”

Train service within Rockaway returned in December with the restored H train. It runs from the Far Rockaway-Mott Avenue station to Beach 90-Holland.

“This shuttle service provides an essential lifeline with the rest of New York City for our residents in one of the areas hit hardest by Sandy,” Richards said. “If anything, what we really need is more buses during peak morning and evening hours.”

Goldfeder, who has advocated for faster train service to the peninsula, noted that south Queens residents already have one of the city’s longest commutes to midtown. With families still reeling six months after the storm, the service cuts would be another blow, he said.

“Our communities are still struggling to rebuild from the damage caused by Sandy,” Goldfeder said. “And the last thing they need is to be nickeled-and-dimed for service that is crucial to helping them recover.”

The MTA, however, said the service, while decreasing, is shifting to streamline travel in and out of Rockaway.

“We’re actually improving service for the vast majority of customers who use the shuttle,” said MTA spokesperson Kevin Ortiz.

There will be more shuttle buses running during rush hours, and decreased service during slower hours, he said.

Oritz said the Cannonball train follows a route that has been in operation for the past century. He added that the only recent change was making the train leave from Penn Station instead of Hunters Point.

 

RECOMMENDED STORIES

Far Rockaway organization gives girls a ‘Window’ to the future


| mhayes@queenscourier.com

Photos courtesy of Angrela Hines

One Far Rockaway organization is aiming to provide young girls with a greater sense of life, more than just “what they see outside their windows.”

Project Window was created with intentions to provide a feeling of camaraderie and a common ground for young women to speak about friends, family and life, as well as opportunities to reach their full potential and face life with confidence.

“I wanted to help girls get help and not become a product of their environment,” said Angela Hines, the program’s creator.

Hines, a Far Rockaway native, is no stranger to struggle. She dropped out of high school and became a teen mom.

However, she was determined to succeed, and started college, with three children to take care of. After graduating, she went on to law school, now with five children. Through hard work, she persevered, got her degree and started work at Queens Family Court representing children.

“I saw at-risk girls,” she said of her time in the courts. “Girls who were struggling in school, with poor family life. I knew I wanted to help, and if I could help just one girl, it was worth it.”

With that, she began Project Window.

Hines works with girls at P.S./M.S. 138 once a week; they sit together and discuss bullying, teen violence, domestic violence, etiquette and more. They also travel to sites outside of the neighborhood so Hines can show them that “there is life outside the only community they have known.”

“Ms. Hines sees that we can do [well] in life,” said participant Domenique White, 13. “Before the program started, all of us girls were rowdy and disrespectful.”

White said that before Project Window, she picked on people and was a “big bully.” After meeting with Hines and airing out problems, White has learned to think positively and change her attitude.

The school’s assistant principal, Shallonda Daniels, said that she has seen a significant change in the girls since they began Hines’ program.

“[The] program has given the girls an opportunity to share their thoughts and learn that there is more to life than what they see outside in their communities,” Daniels said.

Initially a pilot program, Project Window is now looking to expand to all of Far Rockaway. The Ocean Bay Action Center has offered up a larger space for Hines to hold mentor sessions, and the community has put themselves behind her, supporting the initiative.

“I can’t even describe the feeling I get when I see the girls and how they’re changing,” said Hines. “I really feel like this is working.”

If you would like to know more about Project Window or contribute to the initiative, contact Hines at 347-306-8688.

 

RECOMMENDED STORIES

National Guardsman guilty in murder of girlfriend


| mhayes@queenscourier.com

He went from hero to felon.

A National Guardsman and Iraq war veteran has been convicted of second-degree murder for punching, drowning and ultimately killing his girlfriend on the beaches of Far Rockaway.

David Lynch, 33, served two tours in Iraq and was a reservist in the New York National Guard at the time of the November 2010 killing. He was convicted on Thursday, March 21.

“The defendant was trained to defend the weak and protect the innocent,” said District Attorney Richard A. Brown. “In this case, he went against everything he was taught.”

According to trial testimony, Lynch brutally beat and drowned Althea Lewis, 45, of Springfield Gardens. In the early morning, Lynch and Lewis were on the beach having an argument. Lynch punched and bit Lewis on her head and face, threw her in the water and dragged her out by her feet, causing her head to be submerged.

Police discovered her clothed body on the beach with four puncture wounds on her face, later revealed to be from Lynch’s Army ring. The cuts were so deep that cops initially thought Lewis was shot. Ultimately, she died as a result of blunt force injury to her head and submersion in water.

“[Lynch’s] actions have irreparably shattered a family by robbing them of a loved one,” said Brown. “Conviction warrants imposition of a maximum prison sentence to punish him and protect society.”

The Supreme Court set sentencing for Monday, April 29. Lynch faces up to 25 years to life in prison.

 

RECOMMENDED STORIES

Far Rockaway residents still receiving Verizon bills despite no service since Sandy


| mhayes@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Maggie Hayes

It’s been five months since 77-year-old Arquilla Heard has been able to make a phone call.

Since Sandy, the Far Rockaway resident — and many of her neighbors in the Ocean Bay Houses — have had no cell phone service from Verizon.

Heard has received monthly phone bills since the storm, some reaching nearly $200. Despite not having service, she paid November’s bill, but has since refused to make payments.

“Maybe I have my own wires crossed, but to bill people without service seems negligent to me,” said Councilmember Donovan Richards. “For my seniors and my youth who may have had an emergency and no phone to dial out, this is a crime.”

“I don’t have the money to keep paying bills,” said Heard. “I need my phone. It’s a necessity.”

On Monday, March 25, Richards held a press conference outside the Ocean Bay Houses demanding that Heard and others in her predicament receive a six-month credit for the services they have not received since October, as well as an additional three-month credit for the inconvenience.

“It’s a crying shame that Verizon is so insensitive that they would still send bills to people’s mailboxes,” he said.
Since the storm, the community has been left without an explanation about service or billing, and although phone booths have been put up, many don’t work, according to residents.

Verizon, however, said it has offered customers free wireless devices for their telephone service. They have also restored service to nearly 6,200 Rockaway customers since the storm. They are working closely with the New York City Housing Authority to fully restore all service.

“Sandy severely damaged Verizon’s network serving all of Rockaway, including [the Ocean Bay Houses]. By the end of this month, we will begin restoring service to all those who live in the complex from 54th to 59th Streets on our brand new state-of-the-art fiber optic network. We are now working with the housing authority to gain access to the apartments from 51st to 53rd Street,” said a Verizon spokesperson.

Gian Jones lives in Bayswater and was without his Verizon FiOS service for about a month. He too continued to receive bills, but snagged a rebate after repeatedly calling the company.

“There might be some technical issues [with service lines] that we don’t know about,” he said. “But it took continuously calling them and fighting them to see a credit. There’s no reason why Rockaway residents should be paying a bill. At the very least, service should be suspended.”

Residents also noted that not only is there a lack of phone service, but Verizon power lines remain hanging from poles to this day.

“You can walk into the hanging wires,” said Felicia Johnson, Rockaway resident and Community Board 14 member.

“Verizon has really just neglected the community at large.”

“If you can send me a bill, why can’t you send me a letter saying, ‘This is where we are, this is what we’re going to do,’” she added.

Richards asks that any resident with phone service problems get in touch with his office.

“Common decency is needed,” he said. “My residents cannot afford to not have phone service for another day.”

 

RECOMMENDED STORIES

Queens’ Morning Roundup


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

TODAY’S FORECAST

Tuesday: Partly cloudy with rain showers. High of 48. Winds from the NNW at 5 to 15 mph. Chance of rain 30%. Tuesday night: Partly cloudy in the evening, then clear. Low of 36. Winds from the NW at 5 to 15 mph.

EVENT OF THE DAY: Ashley Garrett – Slate House

Acumen Project Space is proud to present Ashley Garrett’s solo exhibition Slate House. Garrett’s new body of work explores uncanny qualities in common household objects. Growing up in a small rural town in Northeastern Pennsylvania, a slate mining town with its now silenced quarry holes and obsolete tools, her work is infused with a sense of still contemplation and memory. These paintings and drawings reflect that stillness and weight and objects take on a totemic-like power when pressured through Garrett’s imagination. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday from 9am to 5pm. Exhibition ends April 7. Click here for more info or to submit an event of your own

Far Rockaway residents and officials call Verizon tone deaf to prolonged phone outage

A group of Rockaway residents without phone service since Superstorm Sandy say the only open line of communication has been the monthly bills. Read more: New York Daily News

Vulcan Society wants FDNY EMT fired following series of ‘racist’ tweets

A veteran of the FDNY has been suspended and the association representing black emergency medical technicians and firefighters says he should be fired. Read more: CBS New York

NY cuts cancer programs in state budget

New York is cutting funding for cancer screenings for the uninsured along with programs to curb teen smoking in a state budget that expands spending to help the Buffalo Bills and Hollywood. Read more: NBC New York

Poll strike at drones

Nearly 1 in 5 Americans — 79 percent — oppose drone strikes on US soil, but they are much more accepting of doing it abroad, a Gallup poll released yesterday found. Read more: New York Post

Italy high court overturns Amanda Knox acquittal

Italy’s highest criminal court on Tuesday overturned Amanda Knox’s acquittal in the slaying of her British roommate and ordered a new trial, prolonging a case that has become a cause celebre in the United States. Read more: ABC New York/AP

Supreme Court takes up gay marriage

The Supreme Court is wading into the fight over same-sex marriage at a time when public opinion is shifting rapidly in favor of permitting gay and lesbian couples to wed, but 40 states don’t allow it. Read more: Fox New York/AP

 

Group of women wanted for assault, robbery in Far Rockaway


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of NYPD

Police are looking for six women wanted for allegedly assaulting, then stealing electronics from two female victims in Far Rockaway.

On Wednesday, January 16, around 4:20 p.m., the group of women approached the victims at the rear of 32-11 Beach Channel Drive. The suspects then assaulted them and fled with one victim’s cell phone and the other one’s iPod.  Neither of the victims were seriously injured.

Anyone with information in regards to this homicide is asked to call the NYPD’s Crime Stoppers Hotline at  800-577-TIPS, or submit tips at WWW.NYPDCRIMESTOPPERS.COM or text their tips to 274637 (CRIMES) then enter TIP577.

 

RECOMMENDED STORIES

One family’s struggle in wake of bus drivers’ strike


| aaltman@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Alexa Altman

Crystal Blount refuses to let her son be one of those left behind.

One week after school bus drivers abandoned their routes, as panicked parents scrambled for solutions, the Far Rockaway mom bundled up her disabled son Nehemiah, trekking more than an hour from her south Queens home to her son’s school, United Cerebral Palsy of Nassau County, in Roosevelt, Long Island.

It’s a small sacrifice for the smiley little boy she calls “pumpkin patch,” known by friends and classmates as Nemo.

In many neighborhoods, parents leaned on livery cabs and public transit when drivers announced they would be halting service in the five boroughs. In Far Rockaway, where the main transit nerve has yet to be restored since Sandy, students were left completely stranded.

In the battle between city government and contracted employees, those suffering the most are seemingly the children, particularly the most vulnerable ones. Unable to take public transit, disabled students rely heavily on school buses and receive more than an education from their schools, attending speech, occupational and feeding therapies along with daily classes. Missing one can wreck a routine and delay progress.

“It’s a setback,” Crystal said. “When a child such as Nemo misses school, it’s a routine broken. What about the next disabled child? A lot of disabled kids can’t get on a car or bus. They didn’t even think of disabled children. And that’s horrible.”

At its peak, attendance among disabled children dropped by nearly 34 percent during the strike, according to the Department of Education (DOE).

Born premature, Nemo spent his first 18 months of life in a hospital. While at age six, Nemo is non-ambulatory, non-verbal and legally blind, working with physical therapists and speech experts have afforded him the ability to react to sounds, light and noise.

“It’s very difficult,” Crystal said. “There’s always a lot to do in the morning.”

Before school, Crystal uses a suction machine to clear out Nemo’s nose, occasionally assisted by a nurse. Thanks to a phone call from Congressmember Gregory Meeks’ office, Nemo is finally getting his first real wheelchair, after fighting with the insurance company for over a year.

“You’ve got to fight tooth and nail to get anything,” she said. “What about the next person who doesn’t have a voice?”

Nemo suffers occasional seizures, often in the first 10 minutes of sleep. Crystal doesn’t like to call them seizures in front of Nemo, so she calls them “S’s”.

Constant stimulation, usually provided by a bus matron on the way to school, is an integral part of Nemo’s growth. For Christmas, Santa brought him a blue and green Furby that sings and chortles to Nemo while he lies on the couch as Crystal completes morning tasks. He titters as the toy wiggles and lets out a triumphant “la la la!” In the car on the way to school, Crystal sings to her son.

“A, B, C, D, E, F, G,” she sings, keeping her eyes on the road.

“A, B, C, D, E, F, G,” she sings again, this time holding the “G” for an extended note.

Nemo coos from the backseat.

“That always makes him laugh,” she said.

Crystal feels disabled children have been left without transportation options. The Access-A-Ride vans, commonly thought to cater to all disabled students, require parents to ride with children and they will only go to schools inside the five boroughs. On the highway, Crystal spots a yellow cab topped with a “School Bus” sign. There are no vehicles like that in the Rockaways, she says.

Both Crystal and Nemo’s father Gladstone work for the city’s Department of Correction. Crystal works during the day while Gladstone runs the midnight to 8:30 a.m. shift. Now responsible for picking Nemo up at school, Gladstone fits a small nap into the middle of his day before heading out to his son’s school.

“And the end of the day, we’ve got to take care of him,” she said. “And he’s the love of my life.”

 

RECOMMENDED STORIES

Mother of boy who brought gun to Queens school arraigned, bail set at $35K


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of NYPD

The mother of the seven-year-old who brought a .22 caliber pistol and flare gun to his Far Rockaway school Thursday morning has been arraigned with a bail set at $35,000, said the Queens DA’s office.

“The defendant faces serious criminal charges,” said District Attorney Richard Brown. “It is disturbing to think of what could have potentially occurred in this case if authorities had not found out about the handgun when they did.”

In addition to weapon and child endangerment charges, Deborah Farley, 53, was also arrested for unlawful possession of marijuana.

According to the criminal complaint, Farley went to the principal’s office at Wave Preparatory Elementary School Thursday morning to allegedly to pick up her son for a dental appointment.

A short time later, she returned to the principal’s office and said that her son might have given a gun to a friend at the school and that one of her sons had put the gun inside her seven-year-old’s book bag.

After searching the friend’s bag, the principal found an orange and black flare gun.

A .22 caliber firearm, a full magazine with 10 .22 caliber rounds of ammunition and a clear bag containing 14 .22 caliber rounds of ammunition was found inside her son’s bag.

Farley told police that she had bought the .22 caliber gun in June or July for protection because of the people who hung around her stairwell when she came home at night.

She also allegedly admitted that she put the .22 caliber firearm and flare gun in her son’s book bag Wednesday night.

After realizing that the guns were still in her son’s bag, she went to the school around 10 a.m., and, lying, said that he had a dentist appointment.

Once outside the school, Farley checked the bag and her son told her that he had given the flare gun to a friend. At that point, she returned to the school and told the principal what had happened.

Following the incident, police searched Farley’s Far Rockaway residence, where they found four rounds of .22 caliber ammunition in a cardboard box in a bedroom in one apartment and seven small bags of marijuana from bedrooms in a second apartment.


RECOMMENDED STORIES

Mother arrested after firearm found at Queens school


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of NYPD

The NYPD has arrested a woman in connection to a Thursday morning incident at a Far Rockaway elementary school where a .22 caliber pistol was discovered in a student’s book bag, said police.

The seven-year-old’s mother, Deborah Farley, 53, of Far Rockaway, has been charged with criminal possession of a weapon, criminal possession of a weapon on school grounds, endangering the welfare of a child and unlawful possession of a weapon.

According to NBC New York, after the boy’s mother dropped him off at Wave Preparatory Academy, she allegedly returned later to take her son to a doctor’s appointment. When she came back with him to the school, the gun was discovered and police were called.

Authorities confiscated the weapon and the school was reportedly put on lockdown.

While investigating the incident, police also found a flare gun that the same child brought into the school,  said the NYPD.

 

RECOMMENDED STORIES

 

Gun found in 7-year-old’s book bag at Queens school


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of NYPD

A .22 caliber pistol was discovered in a student’s book bag at a Far Rockaway elementary school Thursday morning, said police.

According to NBC New York, after the 7-year-old’s mother dropped him off at Wave Preparatory Academy, she allegedly returned later to take her son to a doctor’s appointment. When she came back with him to the school, the gun was discovered and police were called.

Authorities confiscated the weapon and the school was reportedly put on lockdown.

While investigating the incident, police also found a flare gun that the same child brought into the school,  said the NYPD.

Initial reports stated that the firearm was loaded, but NY1 later reported that there were no bullets in the gun, but some were found in the book bag.

The incident comes just a day after President Obama introduced legislation to reduce gun violence in the wake of recent devastating shootings, including the Sandy Hook Elementary School tragedy.

On Tuesday Governor Cuomo also signed legislation to make New York gun laws the strictest in the country.


RECOMMENDED STORIES

 

 

 

Queens’ Morning Roundup


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

TODAY’S FORECAST

Tuesday: Partly cloudy. High of 52. Winds from the SW at 10 to 15 mph. Tuesday night: Overcast in the evening, then clear. Low of 37. Winds from the WSW at 5 to 10 mph.

EVENT OF THE DAY: Best Flicks of 2012

This seven-film series at the Museum of the Moving Image in Astoria, opens with The Deep Blue Sea, the portrayal of a woman who abandons her passionless marriage to a wealthy barrister to enter a torrid affair with a troubled former Royal Air Force pilot. Other films in the series include The Turin Horse, Neighboring Sounds, This Is Not a Film, Moonrise Kingdom, Cosmopolis and In Another Country. Click here for more info or to submit an event of your own

Students return to Far Rockaway school damaged by Sandy

Students returned to classes Monday at The Bay School in the Far Rockaway section of Queens for the first time since Hurricane Sandy. Read more: NY1

Elected officials review Queens library system’s slow recovery from Sandy

The Queens Library was not spared by Hurricane Sandy and now the system is trying to recover from $7.5 million in damage caused by the storm, including 100,000 books damaged in four branches in the Rockaways. Read more: NY1

2 women critical after carbon monoxide incident

Two women were critical after being overcome by carbon monoxide poisoning during an apparent boiler leak in a home in Queens. Read more: ABC New York

Teachers union blasts Bloomberg for NRA comments

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg is under fire for radio remarks in which he compared the teachers union to the National Rifle Association. Read more: ABC New York

“Dating Game Killer” gets 25 years to life for NYC slayings

A California serial killer and one-time contestant on “The Dating Game” was sentenced Monday to another 25 years to life for killing two women in New York in the 1970s. Read more: NBC New York

Flu outbreak in 2013 expected to be among the worst in decade, CDC warns

This year’s flu outbreak is one of the worst in 10 years, according to experts — and a quick glance around your half-empty office.Read more: New York Daily News

Giffords, Kelly launch gun control initiative

Former U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords and her husband launched an initiative aimed at curbing gun violence on Tuesday, the second anniversary of the Tucson shooting that killed six people and left her critically injured. Read more: AP