Tag Archives: Eric Ulrich

Residents say Q41 route poses threat of major accidents


| tcullen@queenscourier.com

Photo Courtesy of Geraldine Bruccoleri

Despite the small steps that are being taken to try to amend a recently changed Ozone Park bus route, residents say there are still major traffic problems in the area.

Those living on 109th Avenue, who first voiced concerns that the bus route had negatively affected parking and noise, say that a little more than two weeks into the new Q41 path, they are now facing the threat of major accidents.

The problem residents were seeing, said Geraldine Bruccoleri, was that the MTA had not mirrored the stops from their original layout on 111th Avenue. She elaborated that bus stops had been placed on the wrong ends of street corners. One instance she cited was a car travelling on 109th Avenue that wanted to turn south onto 116th Street. Because the bus stop is located at the turning corner, a driver now has to look to see if a bus is pulling out — possibly leading to a side collision, she said. As a result, Bruccoleri said cars have been forced to swerve around stopped buses and into the opposite lane to get around traffic.

Another problem, she said, was that the private bus that picks up her sister — who has Down syndrome — is blocked by the Q41 as it drops off and picks up passengers. Because of the double parked vehicles, traffic backs up.

The 109th Avenue resident said she has contacted Councilmember Eric Ulrich’s office about getting the bus stop in front of here home moved — as her mother has a handicap placard and her neighbor a handicapped license plate.

Ulrich’s office has looked into the bus stop, and a spokesperson said they are working on at least getting the bus stop moved from that location. A request has been put into the MTA about the issue, the spokesperson said.

Bruccoleri, who said she’s planning on attending the MTA meetings on July 23 and 25, encouraged MTA officials to come to the area and listen to and see some of the problems.

An MTA spokesperson gave a statement that reaffirmed the agency did not have plans to reverse the line and that the new route had been planned to speed service on the line.

Candidates start slinging mud in 15th Senate District


| tcullen@queenscourier.com


Though the 15th Senate District Republican Primary is still two months away, there has already been heavy campaigning — and a lot of mudslinging.

A mailer sent out by the Juan Reyes campaign last month claimed that incumbent councilmember and State Senate hopeful Eric Ulrich was the choice of Republican party insiders.

“If the Albany political bosses had their way, their hand-picked puppet would already be on his way to the Senate chamber to rubber stamp the backroom deals they cut months ago,” the mailer read.

An official in the Reyes campaign said the race was unfair because of perks Ulrich had been receiving, especially with promoting his campaign. The Reyes official said the State Senate Republicans Campaign Committee had been sending out mailers for the Ulrich campaign by use of the state Republican Party’s non-profit mailing status. This practice, the official said, makes this an unbalanced race.

A representative for the committee confirmed it had endorsed Ulrich for the Republican primary, and that it was legal for them to use the party’s non-profit postal status to send out mailers for his campaign.

The Reyes campaign rep went on to say that funds raised by the committee had originally been established to help Republicans defeat Democrats, not other Republicans. He added that these mailers were probably sent out with little-to-no consultation from the local community.

“They’ve done probably close to half a dozen without any kind of input of local Republicans,” he said.

Bill O’Reilly, a spokesperson for the Ulrich campaign, dispelled the accusations in the mailer, and referred back to an earlier claim by Reyes that his campaign offices had been vandalized by Ulrich endorsers.

“That mailing is utterly ridiculous — almost as bizarre as Mr. Reyes’ statement about his campaign office being ransacked. Queens voters are smart and will not fall for Machiavellian tactics like that,” he said in an email. “Councilmember Ulrich is the clear reform candidate in this race. It’s why he has garnered so much local support.”

On July 9, Friends of Juan Reyes sent a news release questioning Ulrich’s association with John Haggerty, a former Bloomberg campaign runner who was convicted of felony charges in stealing about $750,000 from the camp, citing several recent stories regarding the councilmember’s association with Haggerty. One article attached to the release said Haggerty had submitted petition signatures for Ulrich to the Board of Elections. O’Reilly responded to the release saying, “The fact is, that a campaign volunteer named Mike Michel submitted the councilmember’s petitions at the Board of Elections. Mr. Reyes needs to get his facts straight — and to take a few days off to gather his wits.”

Mystery behind Ozone Park Marshalls


| tcullen@queenscourier.com


It is unclear what has become of the homeless man allegedly living behind the Marshalls in Ozone Park.

Customers and neighbors said a homeless person had been living behind the store, located on Liberty Avenue between 92nd and 93rd Streets, for the last few weeks.

Bill Folz, a resident, said he first noticed a mattress and some boxes behind the store, along with the strong odor of urine, in May. As time progressed, Folz said, more boxes were popping up.

Folz then went to Marshalls management, he said, and notified them. He said they looked into it and contacted local officials.

Marshalls representatives said they could not comment on the matter.

A spokesperson from Councilmember Eric Ulrich’s office said the staff had been notified of the issue and contacted the Department of Homeless Services. When the homeless man told department operatives he didn’t want to go, the representative said, police were contacted and took care of the matter.

A police source told The Courier that officers cannot do anything in the matter except issue a summons if the homeless person is trespassing on the property. There had not been any information about police responding to a call regarding the matter, the source said.

The nearest homeless shelters are Samaritan Village Forbell, located on Forbell Street in Brooklyn, or The Samaritans Outreach Ministries, on 229th Street in Laurelton.

Pataki Endorses Ulrich for State Senate


| kevinj.ryanmail@gmail.com

Photo Courtesy Sal Bacarella

Former Governor George Pataki spoke in support of Councilmember Eric Ulrich’s bid for State Senate at a recent fundraiser.

Pataki said he enjoys the private sector these days and publicly endorses a campaign only when he believes strongly in the candidate.

“Eric Ulrich,” he said, “is someone in whom I strongly believe. [He] has done a phenomenal job at being a fresh, new voice not just for his district, but for the people of Queens and this city. It’s a better place because of him.  His new race for State Senate is critical for the future of this state in deciding whether we’re going to have decent, strong leadership in the State Senate or whether we’re going to go back to the hideous dysfunction that existed just two years ago. We have to make sure Queens and New York City stay safe. We need schools that actually work. That’s not going to happen unless we have people like Eric Ulrich in the Senate.”

The former governor said he looks forward to seeing Ulrich “bring the same young, independent voice he’s been on the City Council to the State Senate.”

“It’s about the future of our state and our young people, to make sure they have a better shot at life than our parents and grandparents had,” said Ulrich. “That’s what being in Queens and being in American has always been about. If I want to give that opportunity to the next generation, I’ve got to step up to the plate and help continue bipartisan leadership in Albany.”

Ulrich and his wife, Yadira, are expecting their first child.

If Ulrich defeats Juan Reyes in a September primary, he will face off against Democratic State Senator Joseph Addabbo in November.

Also in attendance in support of Ulrich was councilmember and congressional candidate Dan Halloran, who recently recovered from brain surgery.

The fundraiser was hosted by entrepreneur Sal Bacarella and his girlfriend Christie Lauren.

One school, two candidates; Nativity alums to face off in Senate race


| aaltman@queenscourier.com

Nativity Church

Before their days of politicking around Queens, Councilmember Eric Ulrich and Senator Joseph Addabbo both took classes and played in the schoolyard at Nativity Blessed Virgin Mary School, though they weren’t in the same class.

Addabbo attended first through eighth grade at Nativity, now known as Divine Mercy Catholic Academy. He recalled the “strict, tough nuns” who ran classes, treasuring the insight they provided for his educational foundation. Addabbo gravitated towards mathematics and science, but saved room in his schedule for the arts. He enjoyed drawing, and in sixth grade, Addabbo submitted a hand-drawn, patriotic poster to a school-wide contest. The poster depicted a map of the United States and the busts of three American presidents – Washington, Lincoln and Kennedy – and the sentence “They did a lot for America. Now what can you do?” The poster won the contest and was sent on to compete at a national level.

Addabbo graduated in 1978 and went on to attend Archbishop Molloy, where he graduated from in 1982. He said many of his grade school friends joined him in high school, some even went to the same college. He keeps in touch with many of them still through phone calls and e-mail.

Politics did not become a major part of Addabbo’s life until he was in college. He claimed that while in grammar school, he understood what his father, Congressmember Joseph Addabbo, Sr., did for a living. His dad told him that his focus should always be about helping people, a mantra he believes he has never lost sight of.

Ulrich attended fifth through eighth grade at Nativity. An active member of the school’s bowling team, Ulrich also played in the Ozone Howard Little League, catching pop flies in left field on his baseball team. Ulrich enjoyed classes in American History, especially those focusing on the Civil War.

One of his favorite grade school memories surrounds the school’s morning line-up. Every day before classes would commence, students and parents gathered in the schoolyard. Father Angelo, Nativity’s priest, greeted everyone, asking them about their days.

“Everyone was running around,” said Ulrich. “It was something to look forward to.”

Ulrich graduated from Nativity in 1999.

Father Paul Palmiotto, a pastor for the past three years, said he sees both Ulrich and Addabbo at Sunday church services and occasionally gets the chance to chat with the two after Mass.

“Both of them are very good people,” said Palmiotto. “Their Catholic upbringing comes forth [in their personalities.]”

Politics in the Social Media Age


| editorial@queenscourier.com


By Kevin J. Ryan
As the technology that connects us constantly evolves, the core skill of written communication is the one constant foundation on which good technological communications must be built. However, public relations professionals, especially those working for a public figure, need to be proficient at using all the latest means of delivering their message. Today’s communications toolbox includes web sites, press releases, blogging, email, Facebook, Twitter, web analytics, YouTube, Digg and search engine optimization.

Demand the Brand

The names of celebrities are brands, like Nike or Apple. They differ from corporations, however, because they are each a personal brand. Public figures must promote and protect that brand even more rigorously than a corporation, because their own name is much harder to rehabilitate once it is damaged. Rock stars, movie stars and athletes are all personal brands, but politicians are under greater scrutiny.

A cautionary tale for politicians using social media is that of former Congressmember Anthony Weiner. The Weinergate flap ended his career and handed the district back to the Republicans. A company can introduce new products or change executive leadership to recover from a controversy, but a politician has no such luxury. The speed and effectiveness of social media is a double-edged sword. What takes seconds to post can cling to a public figure forever.

The Social Media Advantage

Twitter and Facebook are essentially short-form messaging platforms. A brief (140 characters) text message or “microblog,” often accompanied by a link, is all that fits in a Tweet. Facebook allows one to show and see a bit more, which can be better or worse. Like any format of writing, it’s as effective as the writer makes it. The text needs to catch the reader’s attention so that he or she will want to click on the link or follow the poster. A politician or campaign can waste a lot of time on Facebook or Twitter with little reward, if they’re not careful. As with all media, judicious use is key.
Candidates and officials from both parties have embraced the Internet and its social media tools to stay in touch with their constituents and keep them informed. Councilmember Eric Ulrich’s recent State Senate campaign was announced with YouTube, rather than an old-fashioned press conference. The video was distributed via social networking, such as Ulrich’s Twitter and Facebook accounts. Newspapers and bloggers immediately picked it up that morning.

One of the main uses of Twitter and Facebook is to push traffic (“hits”) to a blog/web site, where constituents should be able to see pictures, videos, full-length articles, press releases and biographical information on a candidate.

The traffic can be monitored with tools like Google Analytics, allowing staff to see which Tweets and Facebook posts are most popular. This is especially useful for a politician, because it enables him or her to gauge which issues are most important to voters.

Monitoring programs also allow users to see where the traffic is coming from and which links are being clicked, so a campaign can decide which news outlets or advertising opportunities are most effective. They can see referral traffic, where it’s coming from and where it’s being sent. Analytic programs are among the most useful, cost-effective weapons in the social media arsenal.

Google recently launched a new marketing campaign called Four Screens to Victory, as both a promotion for their technology and a tutorial on how to use it to reach voters via TV, computer, tablet and phone.

Another advantage to Internet-based communication is the timing. When voters look at Twitter, Facebook or a site like Google, they are receptive to messages and want to connect and gain information. More traditional media, like TV, radio and paper mailings often catch people when they’re either much less receptive or otherwise occupied. They can also bookmark, come back and look at a politician’s Tweet, blog or Facebook page at their convenience. That means the presence is long-term and cost-effective, especially for local politics.

Accept No Substitute

Twitter and Facebook are merely tools that will someday go the way of Betamax and MySpace. But the essential core communication skills necessary to make productive use of these tools will always be the same. Skill at writing, regardless of length, format or purpose is what drives a successful public relations campaign. The message needs to be clear, consistent and engaging.

All of these techno-tools can be learned fairly quickly, but there will never be a substitute for knowing how to write a good article, paragraph or line. Good writing is much harder to learn and far more valuable as it disappears from the world. Our Queens community leaders must balance both and continue to adapt to the ever-changing technological landscape.

WATCH: Eric Ulrich announces Senate run


| mchan@queenscourier.com

Councilmember Eric Ulrich will run for Senate in the 15th District.

Councilmember Eric Ulrich — considered a rising star in the Republican Party — has declared his intent to vie for the 15th Senate District seat.

“This was not an easy decision for me to make. I love the job that I already have, and I had every intention of running for re-election next fall,” Ulrich said in his announcement video. “But the stakes are simply too high. While I’ve been able to accomplish many good things at the local level, I believe that I can accomplish even more if the people send me to Albany.”

Ulrich, 27, was first elected to the council when he was 24. He won his 32nd District City Council seat during a Special Election in 2009, succeeding State Senator Joseph P. Addabbo, Jr. — who is now considered his likely Democratic opponent.

In 2008, Addabbo defeated Serphin Maltese, a two-decade Republican incumbent, later winning Senate re-election in 2010 against Republican runner Anthony Como. Ulrich, a second-term councilmember and the youngest in the council, was also re-elected to a full term in November 2009.

According to Vincent Tabone, executive vice chair of the Queens County Republican Party, GOP officials had urged Ulrich to take on the current senator in an election for the past four years.

“Addabbo has been a real disappointment for the people in the 15th Senate District,” Tabone said. “We’re very excited that Eric is taking this step.”

Tabone said Ulrich is the only announced candidate on the Republican side so far.

Josh Cherwin, executive director of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee, said Addabbo has been a “tireless advocate on behalf of the people he represents, which is why voters continue to return him to office by significant margins.”

“We expect the same to happen this year,” Cherwin said. “Few public servants have done more than Senator Joe Addabbo to stand up for the working families of Queens.”

Addabbo did not return calls for comment in time for press.

In December 2011, Ulrich was named chair of former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney’s presidential campaign in New York City.

If elected to State Senate, Ulrich said he would provide incentives for job creation by including tax cuts for small businesses and investing in his neighborhoods to encourage economic growth. His five-point plan to improve schools, he said, includes retaining the best and brightest teachers, building new schools to reduce the average class size, creating new school recreational space, strengthening communication between parents and teachers and accelerating student achievement with Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate.

“If we’re serious about revitalizing our communities, creating good paying jobs and encouraging young people like me to stay in New York, then we’ve got to lower the tax burden for homeowners and small businesses and invest in higher education so that people can compete for the jobs of the 21st Century,” Ulrich said.

The newly-redrawn 15th Senate District encompasses parts of the Rockaways, Howard Beach, Ozone Park, Woodhaven and extends up to Middle Village, Maspeth, Forest Hills, Ridgewood and Glendale.

Queens councilmembers score high on environmental report cards


| mchan@queenscourier.com


The scores are in — and Queens councilmembers have fared well above average in their most recent environmental report cards.

According to the New York City League of Conservation Voters’ (NYLCV) annual “Environmental Scorecard,” a record number of 22 out of 50 councilmembers achieved perfect scores. Queens, the runner-up borough, trailed the Manhattan delegation — which scored the highest average of 95 — by two points, while Brooklyn stood firm with 92 points, Staten Island with 88 and the Bronx with 76.

The annual survey examines voting and sponsorship records on 11 bills covering green buildings, transportation, sustainable food, waterfronts, clean energy and more, said officials at the nonprofit organization.

The average score for the city was 90 out of a possible 100 — up significantly from the 68 point average the Council netted last marking period from 2008 to 2009.

The borough’s top scorers included Queens Councilmembers Elizabeth Crowley, James Gennaro, Karen Koslowitz, Eric Ulrich, Peter Vallone, Jimmy Van Bramer and Mark Weprin. Each of the seven lawmakers racked up 100 point averages.

“This particular scorecard really shows that just about everybody in the Council has a very good track record on this very important set of issues,” said Gennaro, who serves as chair of Council’s Committee on Environmental Protection. “It sort of energizes us to stay the course and keep pushing on in many environmental issues that we’re currently working on. This scorecard really provided some inspiration to carry on.”

Still, not all numbers were high across the board.

The northernmost borough in the city raked in the top three lowest scores. Bronx representatives Larry Seabrook and Annabel Palma both received 64 points, while Councilmember Helen Foster flunked with 36 points.

Foster did not return calls for comment as of press time.

Small business owners air their concerns


| mchan@queenscourier.com


Restaurateur Herbert Duarte cannot undo the headaches, unwind the hours or take back the thousands of dollars he lost, but he can make sure the city council hears his voice.

Since Duarte opened up Saffron Restaurant on Cross Bay Boulevard a little over two years ago, he said the fire department has visited him over 15 times — pinning him with a $10,000 fine for “having too many seats” back in May.

“It’s crazy,” he said. “When I decided to open my own restaurant, I didn’t realize the big headaches that the city gives you.”

Long an expert in the food industry, Duarte — who previously worked as an executive chef at Marriott Hotels for over 20 years — said he never had to deal with the hassle of city agencies when he worked for a major hotel.

But now, Duarte said he has had to hire a lawyer and cut employee work hours in order to pay for the costs. He said the fine was reduced to about $2,000, but he still had to shell out another grand for the lawyer.

“You’re barely making money as it is,” he said.

From architects and attorneys to plumbers and podiatrists, local small business owners — like Duarte — joined city officials for help with surviving being a small business owner in a struggling economy.

“We are trying our best to help people who have jobs keep their jobs, and to create more jobs for the future to make doing business in New York City just a little bit easier,” said Councilmember Eric Ulrich, who hosted the December 15 event. “We want to make sure we keep people off the welfare roll and keep them on the payroll.”

Council Speaker Christine Quinn addressed the concerns of the area’s business owners, briefing them also on recent business initiatives within the council.

“Our job in government should be to help all of you keep your neighbors working, even though sometimes you think our job in government is to put you out of business,” she said. “It’s infuriating when one agency tells you to do one thing, and when you abide by regulations from that agency, you’re violating another agency’s regulations. It makes no sense. They just seem out to get restaurants, and I just don’t get it. I just think we need to make huge changes when it comes to restaurants.”

In order to address that issue, Quinn said the council has created a regulatory review task force in order to help make the city’s enforcement process clearer and fairer to businesses.

“With this panel, we’re literally going through — and it’s painstaking — the entire administrative code to find contradictory rules, rules that don’t make sense and remove them from the books in the city,” she said.

The task force — now meeting issues in its second round of recommendations — also offers increased education and information to businesses pre-inspection to avoid violations.

During the roundtable event, other business owners expressed concerns about parking meter fees and eliminating the Cross Bay Bridge toll.

For more information on the Council’s business initiatives, visit www.nyc.gov/nycbusiness.

Astoria Man Charged With Killing Stepdaughter, Wounding Estranged Wife


| jlane@queenscourier.com

Graphic by Jay Lane

Astoria Man Charged With Killing Stepdaughter, Wounding Estranged Wife

A Queens man was charged with a Monday shooting in Astoria that left his stepdaughter dead and his estranged wife injured. Police say Guerino Annarumma, 52, is facing charges of murder, assault and criminal possession of a weapon after shooting the mother and daughter in their home on 38th Street near 23rd Avenue just before 9 a.m. Read More: NY1

Postal Service Cuts To Lengthen Delivery Time

As financial problems continue to mount, the U.S. Postal Service announced Monday a series of unprecedented cuts. The estimated $3 billion in reductions will affect first-class mail and likely eliminate the possibility of next-day delivery for the first time in 40 years. Read More: NY1

Councilmember Eric Ulrich tapped for Romney campaign

Councilmember Eric Ulrich has been named chair of Republican and former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney’s presidential campaign in New York City. Born and raised in Ozone Park, Ulrich, 26, was first elected to the council when he was 24 and now represents Ozone Park and Howard Beach — serving as Minority Whip of the Republican delegation. Read More: Queens Courier

Blog-of-blood family murder

A seething husband who accused his immigrant wife and her daughter of a green-card scam shot them in Queens yesterday — killing the young woman and critically wounding her mom — hours before the couple’s divorce hearing, law-enforcement sources said.“You are going to pay for whatever you did. I dont [sic] play no games. Good Luck, Bye Bye Bye,” suspect Guerino Annarumma, an Italian émigré, ranted in an Aug. 12 post on his blog about his  tranged. wife Olga Annarumma, 57, and stepdaughter Valeria Kuzima Lowery, 25. Read More: New York Post

Apology from kin of bus ‘killer’

The family of the crazed ex-con accused of a deadly shooting spree aboard a Queens bus apologized yesterday to the loved ones of the victims. “We are truly and deeply sorry to the families,” said a relative of alleged gunman Damel Burton who asked not to be named outside Queens Criminal Court. Burton, 34, is accused of killing his girlfriend’s 18-year-old son, Keith Murrell, then boarding the Q111, where he shot passenger Marvin Gilkes dead and critically wounded another rider, Jojuan Lispey. Read More: New York Post
Queens family of seven evicted in dispute with landlord over ‘dozens’ of violations 

A Queens family of seven is scrambling to find a place to live after their landlord served them with an eviction notice the day before Thanksgiving. Laura and Thomas Cavanagh said began withholding rent on the Broad Channel home after their landlord refused to fix dozens of problems — ranging from black mold under the sink to a rodent infestation in the attic. Read More: Daily News

Two Queens men charged in Connecticut pharmacy thefts


| jlane@queenscourier.com

Graphic by Jay Lane

Two Queens men charged in Connecticut pharmacy thefts

Two New York men were charged by Westport police Monday night with stealing $5,000 in merchandise from pharmacies here and area communities. The men, accompanied by an underage girl, were taken into custody shortly after 8 p.m. Monday when workers at the CVS on Post Road East called police to report that a man had fled after shoplifting merchandise. One of the men, Jeffrey L. Vaughn, 26, of Jamaica, and the girl were found in a car nearby with goods from the CVS as well as other area pharmacies, police said. The merchandise included teeth whitener, hair regrowth treatment, razor blades and allergy medicines, police said. Read More: Westport News

Mitt Romney selects Queens councilmember to lead campaign here

Councilmember Eric A. Ulrich has been named the New York City chairman for Republican Mitt Romney’s presidential campaign. The New York GOP primary will be held on April 24, 2012. First elected in 2009 at age 24, Ulrich was the youngest serving member of the Council and serves as Minority Whip of the Republican delegation. He is a former president of the Our Neighbors Civic Association of Ozone Park, and was active with the Knights of Columbus, Kiwanis Club of Howard Beach, Jamaica Rotary and the 102nd Police Precinct Community Council.  Read More: Staten Island Live

Students rally against bullying at P.S. 11

The students of P.S. 11 are urging kids across the city to “give peace a chance.” Parents, faculty and all 1,300 children from the school, located at 54-25 Skillman Avenue in Woodside, united on November 22 for a peace march and anti-violence rally. The parade was in protest to the increase in bullying and violence that has become a perpetual problem plaguing schools. Students carried hand-made signs and photos and chanted cheers calling for peace. Read More: Queens Courier

Queens woman tries to stiff cabbie after ride to Poconos

A New York City woman is in jail after trying to bilk a car service out of a big bill. State police in Swiftwater said Riley Radha, 42, of Flushing, hired the Big Q Car Service in New York City to take her from Queens to Paradise Stream Resort in Marshalls Creek. The driver accepted $30 up front and Radha promised to pay the remainder of the bill upon her local arrival. However, police said Radha was unable to pay the remaining $320 when she got there around 7 a.m. Sunday, and was charged with theft of services. Unable to post bail, she was taken to Monroe County Correctional Facility. Read More: Pocono Record

Jackson Heights Straphangers Sickened By Droppings-Covered Subway Station

City Councilmember Daniel Dromm and Jackson Heights residents have raised a stink for a long time about the pigeon waste that falls down from the beams of the Roosevelt Avenue/Jackson Heights subway station, but Dromm says he has a tough time getting the MTA to regularly clean it. Read More: NY1

Help The Queens Courier play Santa

To kick off the season of giving, The Queens Courier will be collecting items to be donated to the South Queens Boys and Girls Club (SQBGC) for our annual holiday gift drive. Founded in 1957, SQBGC strives to help young people improve their lives by building self-esteem and developing values and skills during critical periods of growth. The group’s mission is to inspire and enable all young people, especially those from at-risk and disadvantaged circumstances. Donations can be dropped off at The Courier’s office, located at 38-15 Bell Boulevard in Bayside. Read More: Queens Courier

Parts Of Far Rockaway Nursing Home Are Without Power For Nine Days And Counting

One day after a Bronx nursing home resident died due to a faulty cable, Lisa McDivitt reports how a nursing facility in Far Rockaway marked day nine of a power outage of their own. Read More: NY1

Local Airports Confiscate Dangerous Weapons Over Thanksgiving Weekend

Transportation Security Administration officials showed off some dangerous weapons confiscated at area airports over the Thanksgiving holiday weekend. Port Authority police arrested a man bound for the Dominican Republic on Saturday after screeners at John F. Kennedy International Airport found a combination brass knuckles and knife in his checked bag. They also nabbed a man who they say was headed to Germany from Newark Liberty International Airport with a set of brass knuckles in his carry-on bag. On Sunday, authorities took a man into custody after they say he tried to carry a butterfly knife on board a plane at LaGuardia Airport. Read More: NY1

 


WATCH: One-on-one with Councilmember Eric Ulrich


| mchan@queenscourier.com


Councilmember Ulrich, who represents District 32, told The Courier his accomplishments and challenges over the last two years and spoke about his current projects — including the building of a skate park in Ozone Park.

 

[video_post_embed id="3327" width="540" height="306"]

Ulrich helps students prep for college


| smosco@queenscourier.com

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Councilmember Eric Ulrich was joined by the principals of Robert H. Goddard and John Adam high Schools, local students and Kaplan representatives recently to announce the results of SAT prep courses funded by the councilmember.

Ulrich provided $9,000 each to six local high schools which allowed 25 students to attend free Saturday morning Kaplan SAT prep classes.

The classes raised the student’ practice scores from 1232 to 1316 over the course of the class with each subject area – math, critical reading and writing – seeing a bump.

“Before taking part in the course, I was definitely unprepared and nervous about taking the test. I felt much more confident as a result of the practice work, and there was no way I was going to reach my goal without the program,” said Goddard senior Sharon Groenow,

“Kaplan has a proven track record of success in preparing students for the SAT and ACT exams,” said Ulrich. “By giving parents and students the chance to receive the best SAT prep available in the most convenient location, we are helping our young people gain admission to the college of their dreams.”

The schools that took part in the classes were Scholar’s Academy, Beach Channel, Channel View, Franklin K. Lane, Goddard and John Adams.