Tag Archives: Elias Roman

Coalition for Queens receives $1.75M in funding


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Photo by Andrew Kelly

One nonprofit has received almost 2 million dollars toward bringing technology skills to New Yorkers, especially those in Queens.

Coalition for Queens (C4Q), a nonprofit that aims to foster the Queens tech ecosystem by increasing economic opportunity and transforming the borough into a leading hub for innovation and entrepreneurship, announced it received $1,750,000 in funding.

The money will go toward C4Q’s computer programming course, Access Code, which raises the average income of graduates from low to middle class. The funds will also expand the group’s existing entrepreneurship and urban planning initiatives.

“C4Q offers computer programming training that opens career opportunities in tech and entrepreneurship to our talented students, bringing them from poverty to middle class in the process,” said Jukay Hsu, founder of C4Q. “Creating economic mobility via our tech education is something we can quantify: our average graduate income goes from $26,000 to $73,000 a year.”

The funds come from organizations such as the Robin Hood Foundation, Google for Entrepreneurs, the Blackstone Charitable Foundation, Capital One dFUND, Arbor Brothers, New York Community Trust, Verizon, reddit.com founder Alexis Ohanian, and the Bernard F. & Alva B. Gimbel Foundation.

The Federal Economic Development Agency, with the support of Sen. Charles Schumer and Rep.  Joseph Crowley, also came together in providing a grant.

“As the world’s most diverse community, Queens had the opportunity to contribute incredible talent from all social, economic and cultural backgrounds,” said Elias Roman, board chair of C4Q and co-founder and CEO of Songza. “This investment helps C4Q scale the wonderfully successful Access Code program, and speaks to the national dialogue surrounding the need for more economic mobility and inclusion in tech.”

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Courier hosts Power Breakfast on future of LIC’s tech boom


| tcullen@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Terence Cullen

Seth Pinsky, president of the New York City Economic Development Corporation (NYCEDC), made clear that as business sectors based in the city move forward, technology will become more crucial.

“As we like to say at EDC: whereas in the past the technology industry was a sector; increasingly, today, the economy itself is the tech sector.”

Pinsky was a featured panelist for the “The Future of LIC: How the tech boom will affect you & your business!” — a power breakfast host by The Queens Courier in part with TD Bank — on Thursday, October 11, which gave a glimpse of what will become of the growing technology growth in Long Island City.

The breakfast played host to panelists: Carol Conslato, president of the Queens Chamber of Commerce and public affairs director for Con Edison; Andrew Kirby, president of Plaxall; Greg Pass, entrepreneurial officer for CornellNYC Tech; Jukay Hsu, founder of Coalition for Queens; Elias Roman, CEO and co-founder of Songza media; Elliot Park of Shine Electronics; and Gayle Baron, president of LIC Partnership. Featured elected officials who spoke included Congressmember Carolyn Maloney, State Senator Michael Gianaris and Councilmember Jimmy Van Bramer.

Van Bramer kicked the morning off by noting that what was core to Long Island City were the arts and culture that had found a home in the region.

“Who in here believes that culture and the arts drives Long Island City,” Van Bramer asked the hundreds present and was answered with hundreds of applause.

Pinsky, head of the EDC since 2008, said it was important that the city take the lead in the ever-changing tech world. Some of the ways New York has begun to do that, he said, included the Cornell Tech Campus that will have a home on Roosevelt Island and incubators in Long Island City to boost start-ups and small businesses.

“First, the sector itself is a critical and growing sector,” Pinsky said. “We’re increasing employment, we’re seeing more economic activity, but I think that’s only half an answer. And that’s because the real reason why we’re so focused on the tech sector is that in the 21st century the tech sector will also be critical to the success of almost every other sector in our city’s economy. If our city doesn’t take a leadership in technology we’ll find it increasingly difficult to maintain our leadership position in anything else that we do.”

See photos from the event

As Cornell Tech, along with other satellite campuses across the city, begin to produce ambitious minded tech experts, they will most likely find a home in Long Island City because of its location and comparatively cheaper rent prices than Manhattan, several speakers said.

Plaxall over the last 20 years has fostered the art community that gradually grew in Long Island City, and now that community will be mixed with a technology community, said Kirby, who runs the real estate company with his cousin. The end result would be something Kirby said would be “amazing.”

“We already have the creative artists, now we can bring the creative technological people to Long Island City and to do that we need to do things that will make this an attractive area for them,” Kirby said. “I think Long Island City has the potential to be a location where we merge technology and art to create some amazing things.”

To attract the expected influx of techies, Plaxall is laying out plans for a community that could foster a merger between the arts and technology, Kirby said.

This community would be on 12 acres on the East River around what is known as the Anabel Basin. This community would include a mixed-use area of residential towers and buildings for technology companies, Kirby said. The vision for this area is to create “really a sustainable community where people can live, work and play that will attract the best and the brightest.”

Roman, the youngest speaker on the panel, said afterward that technology and culture had already become one in another and could open the doors for more and more potential.

“There’s an interesting intersection between technology and culture, where the technology becomes invisible and it’s all about the culture,” he said. “I think that’s a really exciting intersection to be at.”