Tag Archives: District 27

Daneek Miller wins by a landslide, will replace Leroy Comrie


| mhayes@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Daneek Miller

After coming out on top of a crowded primary race, Daneek Miller easily slid past the general election and right into the District 27 council seat.

“We have a lot of uphill battles,” Miller said. “When you see how working families have been treated over the last decade, it’s imperative that we have a voice at City Hall.”

And Miller will be that voice for his to-be constituents throughout St. Albans, Hollis, Cambria Heights, Jamaica, Baisley Park, Addisleigh Park, Queens Village, Rosedale and Springfield Gardens

Once election night came to an end, the Democratic candidate was declared the winner by a landslide, receiving 96.9 percent of the vote over his opponent, Independent Sondra Peeden, with 3.1 percent.

Miller was backed by longtime City Councilmember Leroy Comrie, who endorsed the union president to succeed him.

“Daneek has always been my backbone. [He] is a proven leader,” Comrie said after the primary election. “He has an ability to do the critical things that are required of a city councilmember.

Miller, a community and labor activist, has lived in the district for 35 years. He is currently the president of the Amalgamated Transportation Union (ATU) Local 1056 and was previously the union’s political director.

Through his time with the union, he has worked for members’ rights, health safety, pension reform, veteran’ rights and more, and hopes to transfer that “success” to City Hall, he said.

Districting debacle: Blurry line for Cambria Heights


| mhayes@queenscourier.com

Photo Courtesy of the NYC Districting Commission

Cambria Heights residents are standing unified against a proposal to divide them into two council districts.

Around 400 people attended an emergency town hall meeting on Sunday, October 21, hosted by attorney and assembly hopeful Clyde Vanel.

“We were expecting 40 people,” said Vanel, who was pleasantly surprised by the community turnout.

Vanel told the community that the New York City Districting Commission was drawing up plans to move a section of Cambria Heights from District 27 into the neighboring District 31. This map was based on population changes from the 2010 census, designed to make sure each district contains an equal number of constituents.

However, at Community Board 13’s monthly meeting the next day on Monday, October 22, residents learned that the commission is working on revising this proposed map, and trying to keep the neighborhood together.

Jonathan Ettricks, director of community outreach for the commission, attended Monday’s meeting and spoke to over 100 concerned residents.

“The first proposal cut out a small piece of Cambria Heights based on population change only,” said Ettricks. “It didn’t take into account the needs and concerns of the people of Cambria Heights.”

The current line for District 27 runs along 121st Avenue from Springfield Boulevard to the Cross Island Parkway. The preliminary draft moves 119th Avenue from Springfield Boulevard to 230th Street into District 31.

Ettricks said that the first proposal was scratched last week — before Sunday’s town hall meeting — and that “the people who organized the meeting hadn’t looked at the [districting] website or called me.”

After a second public hearing on Wednesday, October 10, the commission began revising maps based on public input.

“The goal is to try to put Cambria Heights into [District] 27,” said Ettricks.

“They’re going to ‘try’?” countered Vanel, who is continuing to urge community engagement.

Vanel insists that Sunday’s emergency meeting was necessary, because a large majority of the community was still unaware of the redistricting proposal, as shown from the large turnout.

“I don’t understand how the commission could tell the community: ‘We met, we’ll try to keep Cambria Heights in one community, but the process is still going,” said Vanel. “How definitive is that?”

At the town hall meeting, Vanel passed around a petition, and hopes to acquire 1,000 signatures. He also suggests that residents write letters to the commission voicing their concerns. The process, according to Vanel, is “still not over.”

“Go to your block, go to your neighbors, go to your friends. Empower yourselves,” he said.

However, Ettricks said that the commission is in fact working to accommodate the neighborhood.

“As long as Cambria Heights can be put into [District] 27 as a whole without exceeding the deviation called for by the charter, it’s something that could be done, and that’s what we’re looking at now,” he said.

The New York City charter that Ettricks referenced requires drawing district lines that keep neighborhoods intact.

The next public meeting addressing this issue, among others citywide, is being held at New York Law School on Tuesday, October 30, at 1 p.m. Final draft plans from the commission will be submitted to the City Council by November 5; if those plans are rejected, another round of public hearings will commence. Residents can visit www.nyc.gov/districting for more information.

“People need to continue to pay attention to the process,” said Ettricks.

Parents vote down school ‘Choice’ in District 27


| mchan@queenscourier.com

A unanimous vote overwhelmingly turned down one city proposal that would switch up the middle school enrollment process within District 27.

Following a 7-0 vote, board members of the district’s Community Education Council (CEC) defeated the city Department of Education’s (DOE) “Middle School Choice” plan, which would have allowed students to apply to attend almost any middle school in the district.

“From the very beginning, ‘Middle School Choice’ was a severely misguided attempt to address the issue of middle school enrollment in District 27, which would have resulted in a very confusing process that parents clearly did not understand or want,” said Councilmember Eric Ulrich, a staunch advocate throughout the proposal’s community input phase.

DOE and District 27 CEC officials had discussed the possibility of implementing “Middle School Choice” for the district, which includes Howard Beach, Ozone Park, Richmond Hill, Woodhaven, Broad Channel, Belle Harbor, Rockaway Park, Far Rockaway and parts of Jamaica, back in October 2011.

Under the plan, students would be eligible to attend better schools outside of their zoned residential areas, and DOE officials said the program would provide students and parents with more educational options.

While the ‘Choice’ proposal stated that zoned students would still have first priority for admission to their zoned middle schools, it had garnered much opposition throughout the affected southern Queens communities — especially from parents who were worried their children would lose seats in their zoned schools.

“I want to thank the CEC members for casting their votes according to the will of the parents they represent. They showed tremendous courage in standing up to the DOE bureaucrats who sought to impose this mandate on our district,” Ulrich said.