Tag Archives: Deputy Inspector Jason Huerta

Cops honored for busting alleged car thief


| mchan@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Melissa Chan

Two officers from the 111th Precinct were feted Tuesday night for arresting a man who police say is responsible for a surge in area car thefts. 

Deputy Inspector Jason Huerta honored officers Frederick Omodie and Alan Reid for their persistence that led to the Jan. 14 collar of a perp tied to 14 other crimes in the area, including six car thefts.

Police believe the man went car to car, pulling on door handles and searching glove compartments for keys, before driving off.

“Due to the awareness of local crime trends, intelligence, diligence and relentless follow-up, Officers Omodie and Reid were able to apprehend an elusive criminal, who would have stolen many more vehicles and property from the residents of the 111th Precinct,” Huerta said.

The two made the arrest during an overnight shift, after sifting through leads and asking for stolen car reports.

They searched around 222nd Street and found the suspect driving a reported stolen car with its headlights off. The car was later returned to its owner.

“These two officers are known for their hard work and dedication,” Huerta said. “They are an asset to the 111th Precinct and to the community.”

 

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Toyota Sequoias targeted in costly new crime trend


| mchan@queenscourier.com

Photo Courtesy of Toyota

Toyota Sequoias have become the target of a costly new crime trend in northeast Queens.

Thieves are stealing catalytic converters off the bottom of the SUVs in the 111th Precinct and selling them for the precious metals inside, like platinum, the precinct said.

The needed device that prevents engine exhaust gasses from polluting the environment is worth at least $200 to criminals, police said. But replacing the converter can set car owners back at least $1,000.

“It’s a new thing,” Deputy Inspector Jason Huerta said. “It’s very expensive, and you’d have to get your car towed.”

Four catalytic converters have been taken off Toyota Sequoias in the last two months within the precinct that covers Bayside, Douglaston, Little Neck, Auburndale, Hollis Hills and Fresh Meadows, Huerta said.

The crime, difficult to prevent, happens in about one minute, according to the executive officer. At least two vehicles have been tampered with on residential streets and even driveways.

It sounds like “a very loud rumble” when the car is started without a catalytic converter, Huerta said.

The deputy inspector said parking in well-lit areas, being aware of surroundings and checking on cars, even while at home, could help avoid the theft.

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