Tag Archives: deportation

Ex-Rutgers student Dharun Ravi found guilty in webcam spy case


| jlane@queenscourier.com

A former Rutgers University student accused of using a webcam to spy on his gay roommate’s love life has been convicted of bias intimidation and invasion of privacy in a case that exploded into the headlines when the victim of the snooping committed suicide. Twenty-year-old Dharun Ravi could face 10 years in prison when he’s sentenced. He shook his head slightly after the verdicts were read. A jury found that he used a webcam to spy on roommate Tyler Clementi and that he did it — and told others about it — because of a bias against gays.

Read more on the verdict at NJ.com

Grades spur parents’ revolt


| jlane@queenscourier.com

Graphic by Jay Lane

Grades spur parents’ revolt

Armed for the first time with data that rates the effectiveness of more than 12,000 math and reading teachers, parents yesterday said they’ll now take action to steer their kids clear of bad apples. At PS 89 in The Bronx — which had the highest number of teachers who were rated poorly in 2010 — several parents returning to school yesterday after last week’s mid-winter recess said they plan to pull their kids out. Forty-three percent of the Bronxdale school’s teachers were rated below average or worse, while just 7 percent were above average or better, according to the city’s numbers. Read More: New York Post

Thieves out ‘4’ iPhones

It wasn’t just techie nerds who were eagerly awaiting the iPhone 4’s release — sneaky cellphone subway thieves were just as anxious to snag the gadget, NYPD officials said yesterday. The June 2010 release of the iPhone sparked an underground cellphone-swiping frenzy that still hasn’t stopped, said NYPD Transit Bureau Chief Joseph Fox. Cellphone “thefts accelerated in July 2010 coinciding with the release of the pretty popular iPhone 4,” he said at the MTA’s transit committee meeting. In 2011, 47 percent of all property stolen underground involved electronics — up from 39 percent in 2010 and 35 percent in 2009. Read More: New York Post

Two confirmed dead, three injured in Ohio school shooting

An Ohio teen described as an “outcast” was due to appear in court Tuesday after allegedly killing two of his classmates and injuring three others in a fatal shooting at a suburban Cleveland high school. The first victim of the shooting at Chardon High School was Daniel Parmertor, 16, who died Monday at MetroHealth Medical Center in Cleveland. A second victim, named as 17-year-old Russell King, was pronounced brain dead at 12:42 a.m. at the same hospital, the Cuyahoga County Medical Examiner’s Office said Tuesday. Read More: New York Post

Family Fights To Prevent Deportation Of Jackson Heights Father

Mohammad Anwarul Islam’s family in Jackson Heights, Queens is fighting to keep the husband and father in the country, while he awaits deportation to Bangladesh in a New Jersey jail. His family says Islam immigrated legally but was not granted political asylum. Read More: NY1

Queens’ Morning Round Up – 11/03/2011: 12 charged in Queens with $95 million Medicare fraud


| jlane@queenscourier.com

The Round Up

12 charged in Queens with $95 million Medicare fraud

Federal authorities in New York City charged 12 people — including several doctors — with scheming to submit more than $95 million in false Medicare claims. The 12 were charged Wednesday with participating in Medicare fraud and money-laundering offenses in Brooklyn and Queens. In addition to three medical doctors, they include a chiropractor and a doctor of osteopathy. As part of the scheme, prosecutors said three Brooklyn health clinics paid kickbacks to Medicare beneficiaries and used the beneficiaries’ names to bill Medicare for $71 million worth of services that were never provided. Read More: Wall Street Journal

 

 

Queens woman suffers miscarriage during deportation attempt by ICE; Feds reverse decision

The case of a Queens woman who suffered a miscarriage last month as she was about to be deported to Ecuador is being held up as a symbol of gaps in President Obama’s new immigration policy. Julia Casares, 36, was in the process of being expelled under new policies meant to target violent criminals and fresh arrivals while giving a temporary pass to longtime undocumented residents who pose no threat and have strong ties to the U.S. Read More: Daily News

 

 

Prosecutor in Sean Bell trial calls for firing of NYPD detective who shot man to death on wedding day

An NYPD trial ended Wednesday with a prosecutor calling for the firing of an undercover detective whose gunfire sparked the 50-shot barrage that killed a bridegroom on his wedding day.Nancy Slater lambasted Detective Gescard Isnora for a series of overreactions after leaving a Queens strip club and following Sean Bell and two friends under the mistaken impression they were going to get a gun. Read More: Daily News

 

 

Brooklyn man confesses to brutally slashing teenage girlfriend’s throat

A man confessed to murdering a 16-year-old girl in Brownsville, claiming he meant to slash her face and accidentally slashed her throat, killing her. Rashad Salaam, 22, was arrested on Wednesday and charged with murder in savage slaying of Kyanna Thomas. Thomas, of Rosedale, Queens, was visiting her aunt’s home in Bedford Stuyvesant when she snuck out a bedroom window to attend a party, said police. She was found with her throat slashed on MacDougal Street and Saratoga Avenue at 3 a.m. on September 25. She was able to call 911 for help before she died. Read More: Daily News

 

Worker Dies While Using Lawn Mower for Warmth

As the cold, heavy snow pelted a disbelieving city last Saturday, a landscaping crew — thoroughly chilled after hours spent working outside a church in the Bronx — loaded their equipment into two trucks and headed back to Queens, ready to call it an early day. In the back of one, surrounded by the tools of the trade, Jorge Perez and his cousin struggled to get warm. One of them fired up a lawn mower, hoping the engine might double as a hearth. The improvised attempt for warmth would turn out to be fatal. Mr. Perez, 21, would soon be found dead inside the truck, with his cousin critically injured; detectives in the 103rd Precinct in Queens believe that the culprit was carbon monoxide poisoning, the police said. Read More: Daily News

Woodside mother and daughter granted stay


| mpantelidis@queenscourier.com

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Nadia Habib has been granted the greatest birthday gift of all – the gift of time.

The 20-year-old Woodside resident and her mother, Nazmin, were facing deportation to Bangladesh on September 29, one day before Nadia’s birthday, but the pair was granted a last-minute reprieve, allowing them to remain in the country – for now.

Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) temporarily prevented the deportation after meeting with the family for over an hour. The mother and daughter were placed under an order of supervision, which meant they were forced to surrender their passports, were not allowed leave the state and had to regularly report to ICE until a final decision was made.

“I wanted to stay strong for my family.” said Nadia, who has described this year as the hardest of her life. “I knew I couldn’t break down. It’s scary, because I can’t get my driver’s license and I can’t work. I’m stuck in a bubble. All I can do is focus on school, so if they take that away from me I don’t know what I would do.”

Dozens gathered outside the meeting during a rally organized by the New York State Youth Leadership Council, an undocumented youth-led organization that works on improving access to education and creating equal opportunities for immigrant youth. The group has come to the aid of Nadia and Nazmin by collecting over 6,000 signed petitions and providing the family with an attorney at no cost.

One day after the reprieve, on Nadia’s 20th birthday, the Habib family finally received news they could celebrate. United States Citizenship and Immigration Services Field Director Christopher Shannan granted Nadia and Nazmin a stay of removal, allowing them to remain in the country for 12 months and cancelling the order of supervision.

“There is a huge sense of relief that I am able to stay for now,” Nadia said. “This is the biggest present I could have gotten – to be able to continue living my life the way I have been living it.”

Despite the positive development, the Habib’s attorney, Aygul Charles, warns that the battle against deportation is far from complete.

“The stay of removal is not a permanent relief and there still remain many hurdles to overcome before they can say they are permanent U.S. residents,” said Charles. “There is still a big chance that Nadia and her mother will be deemed deportable after the expiration of the stay of removal. Also, the stay of removal can be lifted by ICE at any moment.”

Nadia, who is majoring in psychology at Stony Brook University, arrived in America with her mother when she was just 20 months old, making New York the only home she has ever known. Deportation would tear her away from her father, who holds a Green Card, and three younger siblings, all born in the U.S.

“I was too scared about my daughter and my wife,” said Jawad Habib, Nadia’s father. “I cannot explain how scared I was on September 29. I have never broken a law here and have always paid my taxes. My daughter should be allowed to be here and study here. Her life here is bright. We don’t have anything in Bangladesh. If they are sent to Bangladesh, my life will break down.”

Nadia and her mother entered the country with a three-month tourist visa and applied for political asylum once the visa expired. On the day of their asylum hearing, Nazmin became severely ill and was taken to the emergency room. According to Nadia, their lawyer was supposed to attend the hearing in their stead, but did not. Nazmin’s doctor sent an explanatory letter to the court, but due to a clerical error regarding the doctor’s medical license number, the judge was unable to verify the letter’s authenticity and denied asylum.

In the decade since their hearing, the Habib family has awaited the fateful letter that spelled the end to their American Dream. On September 16, the notification arrived, informing Nadia and her mother that they had to report to 26 Federal Plaza to be deported on September 29 with no more than one suitcase each to hold their possessions – 50 pounds of space to pack a life in. If the pair is ultimately deported to Bangladesh, they will face a similar situation one year from now.

President Barack Obama took a step towards easing the minds of all undocumented residents on August 18, when the White House announced a policy shift that will focus federal resources on deporting convicted criminals and those who pose a threat to public or national safety. The change spares undocumented students and other law-abiding immigrants facing deportation by allowing them to apply for work permits.

Nadia hopes for a day when the Dream Act will pass, and undocumented residents will no longer live in fear and be subjected to discrimination. She also urges immigrants to unite and make their voices heard.

“You don’t know what to do when you are undocumented,” she said. “You are treated like you are not human; like you are an animal who is not supposed to be here. The government should see every case as a person; a human being with a life and a family. There is no such thing as illegal. We are all human. Everyone who qualifies for the Dream Act should speak up. I feel like the more out there you are, the safer you are. I want everyone who is undocumented to stay strong and keep their hopes up.”

Last-minute reprieve granted for mother and daughter


| mpantelidis@queenscourier.com

A mother and daughter facing deportation to Bangladesh were granted a last-minute reprieve earlier today, allowing the pair to remain in the country for at least one more day.

Nadia Habib, a 19-year-old Woodside resident and Stony Brook University student, was to be deported at 11:30 a.m. this morning with her mother, Nazmin, tearing her away from her father, who holds a green card, and three siblings, all born in the U.S.

According to published reports, Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) has temporarily prevented the deportation after meeting with the family for over an hour today, while hundreds rallied outside in support. ICE is currently considering the case, and the pair cannot leave the state until a decision is made.

Habib, who is majoring in Psychology and minoring in Biology and Art, arrived in America with her mother when she was just one-year-old, making New York the only home she has ever known.