Tag Archives: Dennis Wallcott

Top Headlines From Around the Web


| jlane@queenscourier.com

Graphic by Jay Lane

Liu’s former campaign treasurer pleads not guilty to fraud

The lawyer for New York City Comptroller John Liu says his client may seek to be tried separately from her codefendant. Attorney Gerald Lefcourt notified a judge of the possibility Tuesday as his client, Jia ‘Jenny’ Hou , pleaded not guilty to fraud charges. Her name was added last week to an indictment returned against a New Jersey man. The man was arrested several months ago on charges he conspired to funnel illegal contributions donated by an undercover FBI agent posing as a businessman. He too pleaded not guilty Tuesday. Read More: New York Post

 

Knicks shattered over Amar’e injury

Steve Novak was crushed about Knicks teammate Amar’e Stoudemire’s lacerated left hand, explaining he thinks Stoudemire never realized the danger when he punched the glass case of a fire extinguisher after last night’s Game 2 loss to the Heat. “I feel awful for [Stoudemire] because he plays with emotion,” Novak told The Post. “And you’re walking in a hallway, and I don’t think he ever thought for a second that it was going to be glass, that it was going to shatter.” Novak said he “was right behind [Stoudemire],” though he cautioned, “but I didn’t actually see his hand. Read More: New York Post
Department of Education Outlines Social Media Policy For Teachers

The city has introduced its first guidelines for the use of social media by teachers. The Department of Education says teachers should refuse friend requests from students on their personal accounts on sites like Facebook and Twitter. They’re also being warned that their activity may be monitored and should have no expectation of privacy. Teachers will be given training sessions on the new guidelines. Education officials may also ask parents to sign consent forms before their children participate in social media activities or post their work online. Read More: NY1

 

 

Rent Guidelines Board Holds Preliminary Vote Tonight

Tenants and building owners will once again be squabbling over annual rent hikes for the city’s rent-regulated apartments as the Rent Guidelines Board holds a preliminary vote this evening at Cooper Union. Last year, the board hiked rents 3.75 percent on one-year leases and 7.25 percent on two-year leases. Tonight’s meeting is open to the public, but officials say any noisemakers that can be used to disrupt the proceedings are prohibited. Tenants rights groups and Occupy Wall Street demonstrators plan to hold a protest outside the meeting. The board’s final vote is on June 21. Read More: NY1

 

Cops probe death of baby girl on Staten Island

Police are investigating the death of baby girl on Staten Island, NYPD sources said Tuesday. Six-month-old Genesis Monge wasn’t breathing and had a 105-degree fever when her foster mother called 911 just past 10:15 p.m. Monday, sources said. Genesis was rushed from her home on Steuben St. to Staten Island University Hospital North, where doctors told police she had marks consistent with past trauma, sources said. Genesis died at 11:15 p.m. Read More: Daily News

 

Google knew Street View collected emails, passwords, personal information from millions worldwide

Google Street View had an eye on more than just city streets — it also once collected emails, passwords, Internet search histories, medical records and more from millions of people around the world, new documents show. An FCC report released Friday reveals Google spent over two years between 2008 and 2010 quietly capturing a mountain of personal information by tapping into unsecured wireless networks through its Street View cars, which drive around capturing snapshots to populate the search giant’s massive map database. Read More: Daily News

This Morning’s Headlines


| jlane@queenscourier.com

Graphic by Jay Lane

DA grilling two ‘hookers’ and ‘money launderer’ in case of alleged madam

Manhattan prosecutors have secretly arrested at least three key people in Anna Gristina’s alleged escort ring — her accused money launderer and two suspected high-price call girls — and are grilling them for evidence against her, The Post has learned. Read More: New York Post

Congressman Ackerman Tells Constituents He Will Not Run For Re-Election

Congressman Gary Ackerman, who has represented parts of Queens and Long Island in the House of Representatives for 15 terms, announced to a Democratic Party gathering in Hollis Hills, Queens on Thursday that he will not run for re-election. The 69-year-old congressman informed Democratic Party leaders, his family and staff earlier Thursday of his decision to not running for a 16th term of office. Read More: NY1

Woodson ready to bury Lin, ride established stars Melo & Amar’e

Jeremy Lin may be a global phenomenon, but he is no longer a Knicks phenomenon. Linsanity was the flavor of February, but he appears not to be new interim coach Mike Woodson’s favorite dish. Woodson, calling Lin “in a learning stage,’’ said yesterday he is turning the focus of his new deliberate offense to his bread and butter — Carmelo Anthony and Amar’e Stoudemire, the Knicks’ two stars who combine to make $37 million this season. Read More: New York Post

 

Cops arrest accomplice of burglar fatally shot by Queens janitor

Cops yesterday arrested the accomplice of a burglar fatally shot by a Queens supermarket janitor, authorities said. Alpha Diaby, 22, was charged with burglary for the failed heist that left Mamadou Koureichi, 27, dead. Angel Candido, 54, was taking a nap at Met Foodmarkets on Jamaica Avenue when the two mens allegedly cut a hole in the roof and dropped down. Read More: New York Post

 

DOE Removes Eight Employees For Past Inappropriate Conduct With Children

The city’s Department of Education announced Thursday eight employees are being shown the door following a review of their work history. It comes after Schools Chancellor Dennis Walcott promised to revisit records dating back to 2000 of all DOE employees who were disciplined for inappropriate conduct with students. Walcott says the eight employees were removed because they were not disciplined properly for their misconduct. Read More: NY1

Chancellor to overhaul middle schools


| brennison@queenscourier.com

School-House2

Schools Chancellor Dennis Walcott announced recently his intention to open 50 new middle schools while phasing out failing institutions.

“If a school is failing its students, we will take action and phase it out,” the Chancellor said at the NYU Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Development on Tuesday, September 20. “We cannot afford to continue letting schools fail when we know we can do better for our students.”

Walcott, who replaced Cathie Black as Chancellor in April, said he would hold middle schools to the same tough standards as high schools. He cited the success the city has had in opening smaller, higher-performing high schools in place of failing ones.

There was no indication given as to which schools may face the ax, though Walcott said they will serve areas where there is a demand for better middle schools.

According to school progress reports from the 2009-10 school year, three Queens middle schools received D’s; none received an F.

Walcott called middle schools a tough sell to some of teachers and principals. There are between 40 and 50 middle school vacancies per year, he said.

To help funnel more teachers into understaffed middle schools, a new class will be created in the New York Teaching Fellows Program that is dedicated to training teachers to work in junior high schools in poor areas, Walcott said.

Another way Walcott spoke of transforming failing schools is through Turnaround.

This process keeps the students in place but replaces ineffective staff with teacher teams trained in a leadership development program.

The plan is to implement Turnaround with $30 million in federal money he applied for in five middle schools in 2012 and five more the following year.

Middle Schools will also see a renewed emphasis on literacy. Seventh and eighth grade students were the only ones in New York City to regress in performance on state English tests. Fifteen million dollars of the State textbook budget will go towards purchasing non-fiction books to help bring scores up and better prepare students for high school.

“We will not have met our responsibilities as educators, as parents and for me now as a grandparent, if we do not succeed in our mission to give every child a high-quality education,” Walcott said.