Tag Archives: dangerous intersection

Improvements coming to dangerous Myrtle Avenue intersection


| agiudice@ridgewoodtimes.com

Image via Google Maps

The Department of Transportation (DOT) is about to begin scheduled improvements for the intersection at Forest Avenue, Myrtle Avenue and George Street in Ridgewood.

The plans were originally presented to Community Board 5’s Transportation Services and Public Transportation Committees during a meeting in April.

The upcoming improvements include installing a concrete curb extension on the south side of the intersection on George Street, realigning and shortening the skewed south crosswalk in order to shorten pedestrian crossing distances, installing high visibility crosswalks at all crossings to increase visibility of pedestrians and adding markings to clarify direction of travel for vehicles on Forest Avenue.

The improvements are slated to begin within the first week of June.

This intersection was brought to the DOT’s attention because it is located within the Myrtle Avenue priority corridor and has seen a number of vehicle and pedestrian crashes since it is such a high-traffic area.

“Judging from the frequency and severity of crashes that occurred here between 2009 and 2013, the intersection has been designated a high pedestrian crash location,” said Arban Vigni, project manager with the DOT, at the April meeting.

During that five-year period, there were a total of 18 crashes, six of them involving pedestrians. Two of those crashes led to severe injuries.

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DOT proposes changes to dangerous Myrtle Avenue intersection


| agiudice@ridgewoodtimes.com

Image via Google Maps

Representatives from the Department of Transportation (DOT) offered a plan during the Community Board 5 combined Transportation Services and Public Transportation committees meeting Tuesday night to fix problems at a dangerous Myrtle Avenue intersection.

The Forest Avenue/Myrtle Avenue/George Street intersection was brought to the DOT’s attention because it is located within the Myrtle Avenue priority corridor.

This intersection “is listed among the corridors for which the Department of Transportation will design and implement safety projects as part of the mayor’s Vision Zero initiative, which aims at eliminating all traffic-related fatalities,” said Arban Vigni, project manager with the DOT.

The high-traffic area sees an abundance of not only vehicles, but also pedestrians, with high volumes of seniors and students using the crosswalk. Two buses, the Q39 on Forest Avenue and the Q55 on Myrtle Avenue, also pass through the area, adding to congestion.

“Judging from the frequency and severity of crashes that occurred here between 2009 and 2013, the intersection has been designated a high pedestrian crash location,” Vigni said.

During the five-year period, there were 18 crashes, six of them involving pedestrians. Two of those crashes led to severe injuries.

“It’s also worth noting that 50 percent of pedestrians that were involved in crashes were hit while crossing with the signal, whereas the average for Queens is as low as 37 percent,” Vigni said. “This basically shows that turning vehicles do not yield properly at this intersection.”

Vigni pointed out the odd geometry of the location as one reason for the high levels of pedestrian crashes at the intersection. The star-shaped intersection has Myrtle Avenue running east to west, Forest Avenue going north to southeast and George Street going southwest.

The DOT’s proposed changes include adding a concrete curb extension on the south side of the intersection.

“The curb extension would help realign the intersection somewhat and it would shorten the southwest crosswalk by seven feet,” Vigni explained.

This would not interfere with parking on George Street because there is a fire hydrant located on that corner, which restricts vehicles from parking there.

High-visibility crosswalks were already installed on April 15 to increase visibility of pedestrians.

Finally, “peg-a-tracks,” which are yellow dashed lines, will be installed in the center of the intersection to clarify direction of travel for vehicles on Forest Avenue.

The DOT plans to implement these changes in June.

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Dangerous Sunnyside intersection prompts DOT study


| aaltman@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Alexa Altman

A transit advocacy group is moving to make changes to a hazardous Sunnyside intersection.

Representatives from the Queens Committee of Transportation Alternatives say the juncture of Borden Avenue and Greenpoint Avenue, running above the Long Island Expressway, is perilous for pedestrians and cyclists due to unclear markings and poorly-timed traffic signals.

“Frankly, it’s an absolute nightmare,” said Transportation Alternatives member Steve Scofield, who rides his bike through the intersection frequently. “There really is no safe way for a pedestrian or cyclist to get through the intersection safely.”

Many northbound cyclists choose to navigate the intersection illegally to optimize safety, crossing Greenpoint Avenue and riding against traffic on the southbound side. Scofield said it’s safer for bike rides to move in the opposite direction rather than be at the mercy of drivers with limited visibility. Nearly half of cyclists who cross the intersection use this method.

According to Streetsblog.com, a cyclist was struck and killed by a livery cab at the intersection in April 2012.

The driver of the cab was not charged with any crime. According to CrashStat.org, since 1998 there have been four accidents at the crossing, all of which resulted in injuries.

In order to create a safer intersection, Scofield wants to implement protected left signals and shared lanes for bikes and cars; convert Hunters Point Boulevard into a westbound one-way street; and add more lights for cyclists and pedestrians.

In August 2012, Councilmember Jimmy Van Bramer sent a letter to then Queens DOT Commissioner Maura McCarthy, alerting her to the traffic calming measures needed at this intersection.

“This daunting intersection has had a history of accidents in recent years due to a lack of the appropriate traffic light timing and issues with speed control,” said Van Bramer. “These hazards have put the lives of pedestrians, motorists and cyclists in danger and action must be taken before another life is lost. ”

According to a spokesperson from the Department of Transportation (DOT), the agency will conduct a study on the intersection based on Community Board 2’s recommendations.

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Residents push for safer Whitestone intersection


| mchan@queenscourier.com

accident photow

Frustrations are mounting in Whitestone, where residents are calling on city officials to inspect an accident-prone intersection, located half a block away from a local elementary school, after they said they witnessed a summer of crashes.

“I’ve seen cars smashed up over there,” said Devon O’Connor, president of the Welcome to Whitestone Civic Association. “It’s only a matter of time before a kid gets hit or something worse happens.”

The intersection in question is located at the corner of 11th Avenue and 154th Street, near P.S. 193. A spokesperson for the city’s Department of Transportation (DOT) said there have been no injuries reported there between 2006 and 2010 — the most recent year for which data is available. Before that, there was only one crash in 1996, which resulted in one injury, according to crashstat.org.

But O’Connor said there have been at least four collisions there during this past summer alone.

“It’s just a horrible situation. It’s always been like that,” O’Connor said. “It’s definitely something that needs to be looked at and looked into.”

There are currently two stop signs for vehicles going east and westbound, but residents say cars constantly parked illegally in a “No Standing” zone impair the vision of drivers trying to go straight on 11th Avenue or make a right turn. Having to slowly inch up halfway into the intersection, they say, makes them sitting ducks for speeding cars zooming down 154th Street.

Last spring, 11th Avenue between 152nd and 154th Streets, where P.S. 193 is located, was converted into a one-way eastbound street. The one-way, O’Connor said, also forces all nearby school traffic to hit the dicey intersection.

“When you stop at the corner, you have to crawl up. You can’t see anything,” said grandparent Nancy Palazzo, 54. “I’m very cautious when I get to that corner, especially if I have kids in the car.”

Parent Robert Moravec, 41, said the single stop sign does not cut it.

“When people can’t see with the cars parked there, they edge half their cars out to see. It’s waiting for a fatality. Without a doubt, it’s dangerous,” he said.

The DOT plans to review requests received from local elected officials, calling for an intersection study, an agency spokesperson said. Meanwhile, O’Connor said he has gathered 150 signatures from local business owners, school personnel and concerned parents who are in favor of a four-way stop or a traffic light.

State Senator Tony Avella said he has been pushing the DOT to take action on this intersection for years dating back to his tenure in the city council, to no avail.

A senate bill he introduced, after the agency repeatedly denied his requests, if passed, would require the DOT to provide a detailed written report of its findings after completing studies. It would also create an appeals process, the senator said, for community members to fight decisions the agency makes on whether or not a traffic control device is warranted.

“When the DOT does a study, they basically tell you ‘yes’ or ‘no,’ but they never really tell you why,” Avella said. “The visibility at that intersection is terrible. There are really bad traffic conditions. I’ve never understood why the DOT has not approved, at the very least, an all-way stop.”