Tag Archives: Creedmoor Psychiatric Center

Sen. Avella questions security at Creedmoor Psychiatric Center


| editorial@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/File Photo

By Janae Hunter


After a second patient escaped Creedmoor Psychiatric Center in a six-month period, state Sen. Tony Avella will demand answers about security at the Queens Village facility in a press conference on Thursday.

The NYPD said Tuesday that Clifford Brown climbed over a chain-link fence at the center, located at 79-25 Winchester Blvd., and fled. Brown, 27, who was brought to Creedmoor from Riker’s Island for a psychiatric evaluation, escaped at approximately 2 p.m. during recreational time. Brown was found on Wednesday in good health, police said.

The Courier reported that Raymond Morillo, 33, escaped from Creedmoor on January 28 by swapping clothes with a visitor. Morillo was convicted of manslaughter in 1999 and was transferred to Creedmoor in December of 2013. Morillo was found two days later in Memphis, Tennessee and brought back to New York.

Avella and residents are concerned about Creedmoor’s security practices. Following, the first incident, Avella requested that the Office of Mental Health (OMH) investigate the events leading up to Morillo’s escape. In March, the OMH launched a full investigation of security policies not only in Creedmoor, but in all psychiatric centers throughout New York.

The press conference is at 10:15 a.m. in front of the facility.
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Queens Civic Congress Defends Creedmoor


| editorial@queenscourier.com

The Queens Civic Congress (QCC), the umbrella coalition for more than 100 Queens civic organizations, congratulates Community Board 13 on its vote to oppose construction of two multi-story apartment buildings on the Creedmoor campus, adjacent to several low-density Bellrose neighborhoods.

QCC supports services for seniors and indeed supported development of low rise, low-density senior housing elsewhere on the Creedmoor site.  We are opposed to out-of-scale, non-contextual development that negatively affects built-out neighborhoods like Bellerose.  ICCC’s proposal, which seeks to effectively change the existing  zone to a higher density residential one, is clearly out of character with the nearby low density housing and just as clearly negatively affects its nearby neighbors – with nine-story buildings less than 50 feet from many one-family, one-story homes.

Without any public notice or hearing, the state sold the property to ICCC for far less than market value – an action that Attorney General Eric Schneiderman is investigating.

Queens residents should be especially wary of how ICCC acquired the Creedmoor property, which is state owned land. Creedmoor is not the only state-owned land in Queens.

The MTA – desperate for funds – owns train yards and bus depots across Queens.  In the past, developers have eyed both the Sunnyside Yards and the Jamaica Yards for high-density housing.

Now ICCC’s plan goes to Borough President Marshall for a hearing and her advisory opinion. 

QCC calls on Marshall to turn down ICCC’s plan and instead support the Creedmoor Master Plan, which calls for responsible development that will better serve Queens and the Bellerose community.

And we call on the Board of Standards and Appeals to reject this development, which will jeopardize a thriving community.

 

Patricia Dolan

President

Queens Civic Congress

 

 

 

 

Creedmoor won’t be site of college campus


| smosco@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Bob Doda The Creedmoor site could prove to provide an economic boost for the surrounding community.

A group looking to repurpose the Creedmoor Psychiatric Center site in Queens Village as an applied sciences and engineering college campus received an “incomplete” from the city’s Economic Development Corporation (EDC).

Jim Trent, vice president of the Bellerose Business District Development Corporation, proposed that Creedmoor be added to the list of possible sites for a college in an effort to revive the local economy, but a meeting with the EDC revealed to Trent that school’s out for Creedmoor.

“They wanted to get this thing moving quickly, and the best way to do that is to offer sites the city already owned,” said Trent, who is also the treasurer of the Queens Civic Congress. “Right now we are going to regroup and come up with the kind of tenant that would be appropriate and would facilitate an economic spill off to the surrounding community.”

The EDC issued a request for proposal (RFP) for an applied sciences and engineering campus in July and is looking to attract universities from around the country to build a campus in the New York City area. More than two dozen schools have responded to the RFP, with Cornell and Stanford said to be two of the better known schools to apply.

Trent said that the EDC was very courteous and he appreciated that they were given ample time to make a presentation.

The sites currently being considered are sites on Governor’s Island, Roosevelt Island and the Brooklyn Navy Yard. In addition to these sites, the EDC said that respondents are able to propose private sites as well and that the deadline for such proposals is October 28.

“In addition to the three city-owned sites that have been offered through the RFP process, respondents are able to propose private sites,” said a spokesperson for the EDC. “Once all the proposals come in later this month we intend to review them carefully, with selection ultimately based on the proposal that yields the greatest benefit to the people and businesses of the city for the lowest commitment of city resources.”

Trent is still hopeful that Creedmoor has a chance to house a campus at some point and said that the high number of universities that submitted RFPs makes him think that this is not over.

“If 27 universities have shown interest in coming to New York City, are you really going to tell 26 that they can’t?” he said. “New York is a great college city. And really, anywhere in Queens would be great for Queens.”

Currently, the Creedmoor property houses a number of non-profit organizations, including SNAP of Eastern Queens, the Bernard Fineson Center, and the Creedmoor Psychiatric Center, which Trent said do not stimulate Bellerose’s economy.

“A college could give us 300 professors who might live, shop and eat in the area; 2,000 students who would spend money here,” he said. “More mental health facilities and non-profits do not have economic spill off into the neighboring communities. It’s up to us to find the right tenant for this property.”