Tag Archives: Court Square

Report: LIC land prices nearly hit $300 per buildable square foot


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Chart courtesy of Modern Spaces

Soaring land prices in Long Island City are hitting record highs for the neighborhood, according to the Moderns Spaces 3Q report released Thursday.

The price per buildable square in LIC jumped to an unheard of $250-$300 in this past quarter for some properties, the report said. The average land prices are above $200 in prime areas.

The price surge is mainly due to the demand for bigger projects aimed at larger family-size apartments, according to the report.

“The properties that are being acquired at those price points will most likely all be condos as they don’t make financial sense as a rental product with that high of a land base,” the report said. “But as condo prices rise in Manhattan and in Brooklyn, it’s naturally going to drive the buyer who is getting priced out of the areas to Long Island City or Queens as a whole.”

Meanwhile, for commercial and investment properties, the report found that in south Long Island City — areas near the waterfront, Hunter’s Point, Court Square, and Queens Plaza — land values eclipsed an average of more than $200 per buildable square foot and some properties have hit prices almost as high as $300.

But Modern Spaces predicts this trend will not continue.

“Despite demand being as strong as it has ever been, we predict the market will level in the $225 – $250 per buildable square foot range depending on exact location,” the report said.

Although land prices in Astoria have not hit an average of $200 per buildable square foot yet, not to be left too far behind, land prices in the neighborhood doubled in the past year with some properties eclipsing $200 per buildable square foot, according to the report.

 

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Real estate roundup: Alternate Silvercup expansion renderings, city approves shaming landlords, Court Square permits filed


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Rendering courtesy of LEESER Architecture

Imagine LIC’s Skyline with this Whimsical Silvercup Addition

The expansion of Long Island City’s Silvercup Studios to include Silvercup West, a mixed-use extension of the famed production studio, hasn’t been a dormant project after all; in fact, LEESER Architecture has been busy creating a plan as an alternate to the originally-proposed Richard Rogers design. Read more [Curbed]

Permits filed for two towers in Court Square

The first permits are up for yet another Court Square tower, this one coming to 27-19 44th Drive. Coincidentally, permits were filed for a 26-story tower right next door yesterday, and the buildings will actually be the same height, with both standing 282 feet tall. Read more [New York YIMBY]

NYC’s Queens to get 2,404 Apartments in Durst Project

Rendering courtesy of Durst Organization

Rendering courtesy of Durst Organization

A partnership including Durst Organization plans to build 2,404 apartments on the East River waterfront in the Astoria section of Queens, New York. Douglas Durst’s company said it will invest $1.5 billion in a 2.5 million square-foot (232,000-square-meter) residential and retail development on Hallets Point, a peninsula just southwest of the Robert F. Kennedy Bridge, according to an e-mailed statement. Read more [Bloomberg]

City to publicly shame harassing landlords

New York City officials will publicly post the names of landlords found to have harassed tenants, hoping the public shaming will be a deterrent. The mayor signed a bill on Tuesday that will require the city’s Department of Housing Preservation and Development to post on its website the names of landlords found in housing court to have harassed tenants. Read more [New York Times] 

Riders happy but cautious as G train service returns between LIC and Brooklyn


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/File Photo

Commuters breathed sighs of relief as the G train began rolling into Long Island City once again.

For five consecutive weeks this summer, the subway line was not running between the Court Square station in Long Island City and the Nassau Avenue stop in Brooklyn due to repairs being made to damaged tubes flooded during Hurricane Sandy, according to the MTA.

“The dedication of transit personnel in rebuilding the Greenpoint Tubes and ensuring safe, reliable G train service for our customers is part of our continuing efforts to reinforce the system’s infrastructure and safeguard the most vulnerable areas of our subway system for decades to come,” said NYC Transit President Carmen Bianco.

Regular weekday service on the G train resumed between the stops on Tuesday, making many train riders happy to use the line once again.

Jackson Heights resident Elizabeth Gutierrez was excited to be able to once again ride the G train, which she uses to get to her job in Brooklyn. However, she says she is slightly worried the line will be suspended once again in the future.

“It’s really nice to have something back that I depend on for work so much, but I just hope this whole thing was for something,” Gutierrez said. “I’m just afraid in a few months it’ll happen again.”

Sam Lancet, a Long Island City resident, said he was happy the line was back and running but is also concerned about other subway lines being suspended.
“I’m really happy that now I can just hop back on the G, but you never know what other train will go out of service next,” Lancet said.

During the G train suspensions, which began on July 25, the MTA provided shuttle buses for riders between Long Island City and Greenpoint, Brooklyn.

“To be honest I enjoyed the buses more; they were on time mostly,” said Long Island City resident Gerry Hughes. “But I am still happy the G is back, finally. That summer was too long.”

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Plans filed for 33-floor, mixed-use residential building in LIC


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy Property Shark

Another towering residential structure is planned for Long Island City.

Plans for a 33-story residential and commercial building have been filed with the Department of Buildings  on a vacant lot blocks away from Court Square Park and the subway station on Jackson Avenue.

The building, which is planned for 44-26 Purves St., will comprise 270 units in 206,546 square feet of residential space, according to Department of Buildings records.

FXFOWLE Architects is designing the residential tower, which will also include 517 square feet of commercial space.

The 33-floor building will join not only the 50-story One Court Square building in the LIC skyline, but also another mammoth mixed-use residential building that is planned for the burgeoning neighborhood.

Rockrose Development Corporation is working on a 50-story building at 43-25 Hunter St. with 767,305 square feet of residential space and 18,800 square feet of retail space. There will be 974 units and 67 enclosed parking spots.

Excavation work recently began on this development, according to The Court Square Blog.

 

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LIC demands better communication over G train suspensions


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/ File Photo

The Long Island City community is concerned a new string of subway shutdowns will bring more problems to residents and business owners.

The MTA announced the G subway line, which connects Brooklyn and Queens, will be shut down for five weeks, including weekdays and weekends, starting July 28, though full details of the closure are still being finalized.

Service will also be suspended between Nassau Avenue and Court Square.

Although the transit agency said there will be no scheduled suspensions on the No. 7 and L subway lines during the five weeks, Long Island City residents and business owners are concerned about the inconveniences the shutdowns will bring.

“It’s one thing after another. We just have to throw up our hands and ask what’s next from the MTA,” Senator Michael Gianaris said. “They make these decisions without asking the community for its input.”

The closures are due to Sandy-related repairs, which involve track, structural, signal and electrical component repairs and replacement work, the MTA said. The work was scheduled during this period because it is when the G train has the lowest ridership.

Sheila Lewandowski, co-founder and executive director of The Chocolate Factory Theater in Long Island City, said more commuters are using the line and she hopes the MTA will take the time to listen to their ideas for alternatives before July.

“There’s more and more people traveling within the other boroughs,” Lewandowski said. “It should not just be a talk down decision. There has to be communication. They need to be listening to their communities more.”

 

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G train to shut down between Brooklyn and LIC for five weeks


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/ File Photo

Starting in July, G train riders are going to have to find a new way to get from Brooklyn to Queens.

The line will be shut down for five weeks, including weekdays and weekends, starting on July 28 with service suspended between the Nassau Avenue and Court Square stations, according to the MTA.

The closures are due to Sandy-related repairs, which involve track, structural, signal and electrical component repairs and replacement work, the transit agency said. The work was scheduled during this period because it is when the G train has the lowest ridership.

The full details of the service plan for this G line closure are still being finalized. During the five weeks, there will be no scheduled suspensions on the No. 7 and L subway lines.

Beginning this month, the No. 7 line is slated to be suspended for a total of 22 weekends this year.

Last July, the MTA shut down the G line for 12 weekends in order to make Sandy-related repairs. Although the agency provided shuttle buses during the suspensions, there was an uproar from local leaders, residents and business owners who said the shut down caused riders inconveniences.

 

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Man sought in bias assault on No. 7 train


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of NYPD

A suspect allegedly assaulted a Hispanic man on a No. 7 train before making anti-Mexican statements towards him, cops said.

The 43-year-old victim was on a northbound train about 4 p.m. Sunday when the suspect approached him and punched him twice in the face, then made the bias remarks, police said. The suspect then fled the train at the Court Square station in Long Island City.

The victim sustained bruises to the nose and a lacerated lip, but refused medical aid at the scene, according to cops.

Police describe the suspect as a black male, 6′ tall and 165 pounds.

Anyone with information is asked to call Crime Stoppers at (800) 577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the Crime Stoppers website or can text their tips to CRIMES (274637), then enter TIP577. All calls are strictly confidential.

 

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Court Sqaure station reopened


| mpantelidis@queenscourier.com

Photo Courtesy the MTA:

Court Square station is ready for riders again.

After being closed on January 21 in order to facilitate a substantial rehabilitation project, “7” trains resumed making stops at the Long Island City station on Monday, April 2.

The revitalization plan included platform and windscreen replacement and the enhancement of accessibility features – which will make the station compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act. A new platform composed of fiberglass and resin was also constructed, making it lighter and corrosion resistant.

“Returning Court Square station to revenue service will once again allow our customers to take advantage of the recently completed in-system free transfer, and with full rehabilitation work nearly complete, the fast-growing area of Long Island City will have a refurbished and updated complex that will be fully accessible,” said NYC Transit President Thomas Prendergast.

Expansion joints, tactile warning tiles and four new track drains were also installed along both platforms during the closure, and the mezzanine was rehabilitated as well. Other improvements include new stair stringers and treads connecting the mezzanine to both the Queens and Manhattan-bound platforms and new conduits to accommodate relocated fare collection equipment.

Although the project is close to completion, the MTA continues to work on the “upgrade and modernization” of the “7” line. Project updates can be viewed at http://www.mta.info/nyct/service/building7update.htm.