Tag Archives: Councilmember Peter Vallone Jr.

Sports Star: Sierra Berkel, captain, Townsend Harris HS girls basketball team


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Liam La Guerre

Name: Sierra Berkel
School: Townsend Harris
Grade: Senior
Sport: Basketball
Position: Forward

Sierra Berkel is a senior on the Townsend Harris High School basketball team. Berkel is leading the team to its third straight undefeated regular season in the PSAL (12-0), currently averaging 15 points and 8 rebounds per game as of January 22. She has been captain of the basketball team since her sophomore year and is also captain of the school’s girls flag football team. She boasts a 93 percent average, and is a member of ARISTA, the National Honor Society. Berkel also volunteered in former Councilmember Peter Vallone Jr.’s office during his 2013 Queens borough president campaign. Berkel will be attending Haverford College next semester, and will be a part of the school’s basketball team.

Why are you motivated to do well academically and in extracurricular activities?
“My father passed when I was very young. My mother raised me and my twin brother all by herself. Knowing what strength is, I got that from my family. Being able to do well academically and excel in sports is all part of what my family has given me.”

What is your favorite class?
“I think my most interesting class was urban studies class. I took it at Queens College. I think that was pretty interesting, because it was about poverty in the city, causes and how to stop it. That really opened up my eyes.”

Why do you like sports?
“I think it’s really important. Definitely doing basketball I found I was more involved in the school. Also, serving as captain it definitely teaches you leadership and I think that definitely help lift my confidence.”

How did working in Peter Vallone Jr.’s office help you?
“I didn’t know much about the Queens Borough president and politics, but it’s really interesting and important. I learned too that you can make a change in your community. That was definitely a great experience, because you learn your voice is being counted.”

How difficult is it to manage all your extracurricular activities?
“My mother was a teacher, so the importance of education was stressed to me. Working hard and doing well in school is important, because I know it’s valued at my house. There are definitely some tired days, but I knew I wanted to be involved in everything.”

Any words for your coach?
I just wanted to emphasize how much of an impact my coach, Ms. Lauren Caiaccia, has had on me during my whole high school experience. She is a great coach, mentor and friend. She has definitely pushed me and helped me improve my game, as well as try things that I’m not as comfortable with to get better. So individually and holistically as a team, she is a great factor in the success.

 

RECOMMENDED STORIES

Community demands end to disruptive subway noise by Astoria school


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/ Photo by Angy Altamirano

Local elected officials and the P.S. 85 community in Astoria want to put a screeching halt to subway noise.

State Senator Michael Gianaris, Assemblymember Aravella Simotas, Councilmember Peter Vallone Jr. and Councilmember-elect Costa Constantinides joined community leaders, parents, teachers and students from P.S. 85 at a rally Tuesday to demand the MTA and Department of Education (DOE) alleviate noise problems created by the N and Q elevated subway line.

During the rally, speakers were constantly interrupted by a total of 16 trains that passed by in front of the school. Students, teachers and elected officials put up two fingers, a gesture used daily to pause school lectures, every time a train car passed.

“It is an unacceptable learning environment,” said Gianaris. “It’s been going on for decades and it’s something that shouldn’t be so difficult to fix as it apparently seems to be in the hands of the DOE and the MTA.”

Gianaris and Simotas sent a letter to both the MTA and DOE calling for the agencies to come up with noise reduction ideas, including installing soundproof windows, acoustic sound-absorbing tiles, rubber wheels on the trains, cushioning the rails with rubber pads, and putting up a sound barrier between the outdoor subways platform and the school.

“It’s hard enough to grab a child’s attention, but to have to do it over and over again is too much to ask. My father had acoustic tiles put in years ago, but times and technology have changed and more needs to be done,” said Vallone.

Vallone recently announced the MTA will be implementing a new technology on every train car on the N and Q subways lines, which will help reduce the noise of the air brakes at the lines’ last stop at the Astoria-Ditmars Boulevard station.

According to students and teachers, during rush hour trains pass by every two minutes and during normal hours, every five minutes.

“It’s not fair to take any time away from their education,” said Farhan Mahin, a fifth grader and P.S. 85 student council president. “We want quiet now. This is our cause and we will not stand for anything else.”

According to Rebecca M. Bratspies, professor of law and director of The City University of New York School of Law Center for Urban Environmental Reform, a recent study revealed the sound noise in the P.S. 85 classrooms was close to 90 decibels, almost double the normal standard.

“The noise outside P.S. 85 is unfair to our children and does not supply them with a conducive learning environment,” said Constantinides, whose son attends P.S. 85. “We owe them better than the distracting environment they currently inhabit at PS 85.”

According to DOE spokesperson Marge Feinberg, P.S. 85 is a high-performance school which received an A on its recent Progress Report and some classrooms already have acoustic tiles.

“Instruction is not being disrupted,” said Feinberg. “Some classrooms have acoustic tiles. The 1st floor has five rooms with acoustic tile facing the front of the building. The 2nd floor has three rooms plus the auditorium facing the front of the building. The 3rd floor has two rooms facing the front of the building. They are all facing the side of the building exposed to the train.”

Terminal switches for the Ditmars Boulevard subway station are located right by the school making the noise problem at the site hard to fix, according to MTA spokesperson Kevin Ortiz.

“These switches are scheduled for replacement in the next capital plan (2015-2019).  In the meantime, we have dispatched crews to tighten any loose bolts or joints that may contribute to noise,” Ortiz said.

RECOMMENDED STORIES

Brakes put on Astoria-Ditmars subway noise


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Cristabelle Tumola

One local politician is putting a stop to train noise.

Councilmember Peter Vallone Jr. announced Monday that the MTA will be implementing a new technology on every train car on the N and Q subways lines which will help reduce the noise of the air brakes at the lines’ last stop at the Astoria-Ditmars Boulevard station.

“This deafening noise has been scaring little kids, startling our senior citizens and damaging our ear drums for too long,” said Vallone. “We commend the MTA for working to solve this problem and look forward to shopping, working and commuting near the Ditmars stations without having this constant ‘ear-sore’ above our heads.”

Vallone has been fighting since 2012 against the loud noise, caused at the last stop when the conductor applies the emergency brake to allow him or her to walk to the end of the platform and take the train the opposite direction.

Last year, Vallone sent a letter to MTA President Thomas Prendergast calling for action to be taken against the noise from the above ground trains. In response, the MTA had its Car Equipment Division inspect subway and track equipment on the subway line.

Based on the study, which showed the air brakes caused an increase in the surrounding area’s sound level, the MTA will now be installing “noise dampers” on all cars on the N and Q subway lines. This technology will still allow train crews to hear the brakes being applied.

 

RECOMMENDED STORIES

Vallone introduces legislation to remove Ed Koch from Queensboro Bridge name


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of NYC Mayor's Office Flickr/By Edward Reed

One local politician is taking the next step to bring the Queensboro Bridge back to the borough.

Councilmember Peter Vallone Jr. introduced legislation on Tuesday to reestablish the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge to its original name, the Queensboro Bridge.

The city renamed the bridge in 2011 after the former Mayor Ed Koch, who passed away on February 1. Vallone led the opposition against the renaming of the bridge in 2011, along with 12 other councilmembers.

Vallone’s bill instead calls to rename the Manhattan Municipal Building, located at 1 Centre Street in Manhattan, as the Ed Koch Manhattan Municipal Building.

“While I realize this bill will not pass before the end of my term, I wanted to start the process so that Queens elected officials who come after me can restore the Queensboro Bridge to its rightful owners, while simultaneously providing an appropriate honor for the late Mayor Koch,” said Vallone.

 

RECOMMENDED STORIES

Pol: Report crime stats for more parks


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

File photo

Here in the largest city in the country, crimes are only reported in 31 parks. Councilmember Peter Vallone Jr. wants to fix that problem.

Vallone, chair of the City Council’s Public Safety Committee, held a hearing on November 22 in connection with his proposed law that would require the NYPD to submit to the Council crime reports for all city parks and playgrounds larger than once acre.

The councilmember said the amendment will close a “loophole” from a bill he passed in 2006.

That legislation originally required the crime reporting of 20 parks, but was supposed to be extended to hundreds more over three years. But, according to Vallone, the NYPD didn’t need to make those increases if the technology wasn’t available to do it.

“We can no longer allow the NYPD to hide behind a claimed lack of technology to avoid providing the public with this vital information. This bill will improve upon my original bill and increase the amount of parks covered from 31 to over 870, and publish this information on the web,” said Vallone.

Geoffrey Croft, president of NYC Park Advocates, doesn’t believe Vallone’s legislation goes far enough in “closing the loopholes” because it doesn’t cover the majority of the city’s recreation and green spaces.

According to the Parks department, there are more than 1,700 parks, playgrounds and recreation facilities in the five boroughs.

“If passed this law would continue to endanger the lives of the public, the police and PEP [Parks Enforcement Patrol] officers by not requiring the city track crimes on all park properties,” said Croft.

Vallone said he is also “looking for ways to include playgrounds and other areas smaller than an acre, but larger than a patch of grass.”

 

RECOMMENDED STORIES

Vallone: Develop Astoria Park Pool area into ice skating rink


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Councilmember Peter Vallone Jr.

Astoria Park could soon be the next site to go skating for the holidays.

Councilmember Peter Vallone Jr. sent a letter to Parks Department Commissioner Veronica White on November 19, asking the agency to develop the Astoria Park Pool area into an ice skating rink. The area being proposed for the rink is next to the pool and used for sprinklers during the summer.

“This area in the Astoria Park Pool would make the perfect space for an ice skating rink for the residents of Queens to enjoy during the winter months,” said Vallone. “With the addition of an ice skating rink to the existing skate park and upcoming amphitheater, Astoria Park will be a destination for every season.”

Vallone hopes an agreement could be reached for the Astoria Park Pool, like the one created between the Parks department and Open Space Alliance of North Brooklyn to maintain and operate the ice rink at the McCarren Park Pool in Brooklyn. The McCarren Park Pool uses its beach area, next to the main pool, for its skating rink.

 

RECOMMENDED STORIES

Councilmember Peter Vallone Jr. has tires slashed


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Councilmember Peter Vallone Jr.'s Facebook

Some tire slashing isn’t leaving one Astoria politician deflated.

Councilmember Peter Vallone Jr. woke up on Wednesday to find that two wheels of his car parked in his driveway had been slashed. A worker at a tire shop confirmed to Vallone that the tires had been cut.

According to the elected official’s Facebook account, his home has cameras installed that may have caught the suspect in action.

“I’m fully cooperating with the NYPD and hopeful that whoever did this is apprehended,” said Vallone.

The crime did not stop the councilmember from heading off t0 Astoria’s P.S. 70 shortly after the discovery to celebrate fall career day with the school’s students.

 

RECOMMENDED STORIES

 

LIC, Astoria best bet for hailing green cabs


| mchan@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of the Taxi & Limousine Commission

Queens taxi riders have the best shot at hailing a green cab in Long Island City and Astoria.

Nearly 900 new apple green cabs roam the northwestern edge of the borough, according to data from the Taxi & Limousine Commission (TLC).

City officials said more than 1,000 borough taxis have hit the streets since the first fleet of its kind rolled out in early August.

“Borough taxis have quickly proven themselves to be immensely popular, with almost 300,000 rides having already taken place,” said Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who proposed the plan in 2011. “The new taxis have been a hit with both riders and drivers, and they will become an increasingly common sight in communities that previously lacked taxi service.”

LIC and Astoria, near the western part of the Ravenswood Houses, have 223 wheelchair-accessible green cabs and 675 standard ones, TLC data shows.

The area also includes the strip of land bordering the East River, the Queensbridge Houses and a portion of the neighborhood north of Queens Plaza and west of Northern Boulevard.

“They are all over the place in Long Island City and Astoria,” said passenger David Gutierrez.

“They’ve just become part of the community.”

The 31-year-old LIC resident, who cruises to Astoria in a green cab for business almost every day, said he has no trouble spotting one.

“I like the green color,” he said. “You definitely can’t miss them.”

Neighborhoods with the lowest number of green cabs include Flushing, Far Rockaway, Forest Hills and Middle Village, according to TLC data. There is at least one street hail livery base in each of those regions but no licensed green cabs listed.

Heather Bartone of Astoria said Steinway Street is a “green cab central,” but she is often left stranded in Flushing, where she works.

“I rarely see any in Flushing, so instead I have to take a regular taxi back home,” said Bartone, 41.

City officials announced Tuesday a new website called www.borotaxis.org, created to let New Yorkers suggest new green cab locations.

The new taxis are licensed to pick up street hails anywhere in the city, except in certain parts of Manhattan and at airports.

They charge the same fare as yellow cabs and must also have taximeters, a TLC permit number, credit card machines, roof lights and rate information printed on its front driver and passenger doors.

The TLC said it has already finished selling its first 6,000 borough taxi licenses allotted this year.

However, Mayor-elect Bill de Blasio has been a staunch opponent of the new taxi plan, going so far as to say he would fire Taxi & Limousine Commissioner David Yassky, according to reports.

Councilmember Peter Vallone Jr., who chairs the Public Safety Committee, said the commission has not yet cracked down on pockets of illegal hail activity as promised.

“It seems the green cabs are just sitting outside train stops with livery cabs that are still illegally picking up passengers,” he said. “That wasn’t the deal.”

A TLC spokesperson said the commission would soon beef up enforcement after more than doubling its field strength over the past two years.

 

RECOMMENDED STORIES

 

Costa Constantinides wins City Council District 22 race


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/ Photo by Angy Altamirano

Costa Constantinides is making history and will now serve the community he has called home his whole life.

The lifelong Astoria resident has been elected to fill Peter Vallone Jr.’s seat in City Council District 22 and represent Astoria, Long Island City and parts of Jackson Heights. With 100 percent of the precincts reporting, he won the race with 66 percent of the vote, according to unofficial results.

“The voters have spoken,” said Constantinides. “I feel very humbled about the weight of what this means and the faith the people of this district have put in me.”

His win marks the first time since 1974 that a member of the Vallone family does not hold the seat in District 22. Before current Councilmember and term-limited Peter Vallone Jr. was elected to represent the district, his father, former Speaker Peter Vallone Sr. held the seat.

Constantinides celebrated his victory together with his wife, four-year old son, family, friends and supporters as the Democratic winner in the general election on November 5 at Raven’s Head Public House in Astoria. He was also joined by State Senator Michael Gianaris, Assemblymember Aravella Simotas and Michael DenDekker.

“I’m looking forward to representing each and every one of the 160,000 constituents of this district and making sure that government works for them and that they have a voice in City Hall that is going to fight for them every single day,” he said. “That’s why I decided to run for City Council.”

According to Constantinides, he is the first Greek American to be elected into the City Council.

In September, Constantinides took the win against attorney John Ciafone and longtime Community Board 1 member Constantinos “Gus” Prentzas in the democratic primary.

In 2009, he was elected to serve as the Democratic District Leader for the 36th Assembly District, Part A. He also served as Legislative Director and Deputy Chief of Staff to Councilmember James F. Gennaro where he assisted on key legislation.

Some of the main areas Constantinides hopes to address when taking the seat in January are better environmental protection including reducing traffic congestion, expanding open space and investing in clean energy. He also hopes to improve schools for the children in his district and plans to clean up the streets, by prioritizing the increase of corner garbage pickups and funding a street sweeping program like the Doe Fund.

“The things that we talked about resonated in this campaign and I feel we have a mandate now to get those things accomplished,” he said.

Constantinides was running against Republican Daniel Peterson, Green Party candidate Lynne Serpe, Independent Danielle De Stefano and Populist Party candidate Gerald Kann.

“I’m looking forward to fighting for the people in this district,” said Constantinides. “The next step is to go out there and start fighting.”

Queens pols face Bronx rivals in first Battle of the Boroughs Bowl


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photos by Liam La Guerre

Politicians turned into playmakers for a special touch football game.

Queens and Bronx politicians faced off in the first ever Battle of the Boroughs Bowl at Monsignor McClancy High School in East Elmhurst Sunday.

The touch football event was organized to raise money by collecting donations, with all proceeds going to the United Service Organizations (USO) and the Wounded Warriors Project.

“At the heart, the core of this little fun outing that we are having, where hopefully no one will be hurt, is a really serious intent, and that intent is to help our veterans,” said Assemblymember Mike Benedetto, who is chair of the Veterans’ Affairs Committee.

The lawmakers in attendance ranged from all levels of government, including City Comptroller John Liu, State Senator Mike Gianaris, Councilmember Jimmy Van Bramer, Councilmember Peter Vallone Jr., Assemblymember Mike DenDekker and many more.

“Off the field and out of the office it’s good to have a personal relationship with your colleagues,” said DenDekker, who helped organize the event.

In addition to playing for a good cause, many of the politicians competed for city bragging rights.

“It’s friendly, it’s a fundraiser for our veterans, but its also serious business,” said Councilmember Jimmy Van Bramer. “We’re obviously competitive people, we are used to winning. And I am anxious to demonstrate to the people of my district that I can play football even though it’s been 20 years.”

In the end, Queens lost to the Bronx, 20-19.

 

RECOMMENDED STORIES 

Costa Constantinides eyeing Vallone’s seat in 22nd Council District


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

File photo

After winning the Democratic primary last month, Costa Constantinides is ready to head into the General Election to fill departing Councilmember Peter Vallone Jr.’s seat in the 22nd Council District.

“I think Astoria has always been a great place to live, I had a wonderful childhood growing up here,” he said. “It’s a wonderful place and I just want to help continue to foster that same atmosphere.”

In 2009, Constantinides was elected to serve as the Democratic District Leader for the 36th Assembly District, Part A. He served as Legislative Director and Deputy Chief of Staff to Councilmember James F. Gennaro.

In September, Constantinides took the win against attorney John Ciafone and longtime Community Board 1 member Constantinos “Gus” Prentzas in the Democratic primary.

Some of the main areas Constantinides hopes to address if elected are better environmental protection, including reducing traffic congestion, expanding open space and investing in clean energy. He also hopes to improve schools for the children in his district, with introducing better technology and dealing with overcrowding.

Constantinides also plans to clean up the streets by prioritizing garbage pickups, funding a street sweeping program like the Doe Fund, and making sure there are enough enforcement agents to make sure the community stays clean.

“All these things are sort of interconnected with one another and I think when we deal with each individual problem we’re going to help our community move itself forward,” said Constantinides.

Constantinides will run against Republican Daniel Peterson, Green Party candidate Lynne Serpe, Independent Danielle De Stefano and Populist Party candidate Gerald Kann in the general election on November 5.

“This is a real opportunity to vote for the mayor. It’s going to decide our city government,” he said. “It’s important to make sure your voice is heard. So I really encourage every constituent to come out and be part of the process, whether they’re voting for me or not.”

 

RECOMMENDED STORIES

Mount Sinai Queens breaks ground on $125 million expansion project


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/ Photo by Angy Altamirano

Mount Sinai Queens is becoming the “hospital of tomorrow” as it breaks ground on its $125 million expansion project.

Hospital officials, community members and elected officials gathered on Monday, October 21 to break ground on the project that will help improve health care in the Astoria community.

“Today’s groundbreaking signifies more than just a new building for our hospital,” said Caryn A. Schwab, executive director at Mount Sinai Queens. “I’m grateful to Mount Sinai leadership, our elected officials, and the community partners with whom we worked most closely to make this project a reality.”

The expansion, which began in August, will include a larger state- of-the-art emergency department to be name the Starvos Niarchos Foundation. It will feature 35 patient bays, eight observation beds, an off street “drive-through” ambulance bay, a separate walk-in entrance and a new imaging suite.

The project will also bring seven new operating rooms and an expansion of the hospital’s outpatient medical services featuring a multispecialty medical practice, new primary care physicians, new specialists in cardiology, orthopedics and other departments, and integrated laboratory services.

“We’re going to be building the hospital of tomorrow,” said Dr. Kenneth L. Davis, president and CEO of Mount Sinai Health System. “In just a few more years, this part of Queens will be home to a state-of-the-art health care institution that will further enhance the quality of care and improve patient outcomes.”

Rendering Courtesy Mount Sinai Queens

New windows will be installed in the existing building and central air conditioning will be provided to all patient rooms.

“The people of Western Queens are fortunate to have a hospital that is adapting the changes taking place in medicine today, and that will soon be offering a new level of 21st century care as we create this spectacular new building,” said David L. Reich, president and COO of The Mount Sinai Hospital.

Once it is completed, it is estimated that the expansion will create close to 460 construction-related jobs, 340 additional jobs and 160 staff jobs, it will also add approximately $166 million to the local economy, officials said.

“As other hospitals are closing and being cutback, this one is growing and being added to,” said Councilmember Peter Vallone Jr., who has provided funding for the hospital through the City Council throughout the years. “Medicine keeps progressing and we have to stay up with that and that’s what this is about, staying up with the new needs of this growing community.”

The expansion project is expected to be completed by 2016. NK Architects and Davis Brody Bond were the architects. Skanska USA is the builder on the project. 

 

Recommended Stories

Green Party candidate Lynne Serpe has ‘22 Ideas for District 22’


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Photo Courtesy Lynne Serpe

One candidate is ready to turn Astoria green.

In June, Lynne Serpe announced she would be running to fill departing Councilmember Peter Vallone Jr.’s seat in the 22nd Council District, serving Astoria, Long Island City and parts of Jackson Heights.

Serpe ran against Vallone for City Council in 2009. She is currently the project consultant for the Greening Libraries Initiative at Queens Library and an independent election administrator. She is also an active member of Two Coves Community Garden and the co-founder of Triple R Events: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle.

Some of the ideas Serpe hopes to bring to Astoria if she gets elected are affordable housing and sustainable development, healthy schools and neighborhoods, clean energy and a green economy, and fair elections. Serpe has created a list called “22 Ideas for District 22” which can be found on her website at serpeforcouncil.org/22ideas.

“Clean air, clean water, clean energy and clean streets are not partisan issues – they affect the quality of life for all of us,” said Serpe.

Serpe will run against Democrat Costa Constantinides, Independent Party candidate Danielle De Stefano, Republican Daniel Peterson and Populist Party candidate Gerald Kann.

 

RECOMMENDED STORIES

Astoria celebrates Italian heritage at 36th Annual Christopher Columbus Day Parade


| editorial@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Councilmember Peter Vallone Jr.

Astoria got together this past weekend to celebrate the 36th Annual Christopher Columbus Day Parade.

On Saturday, October 12, together with Councilmember Peter Vallone Jr., former Speaker Peter Vallone Sr., Assemblymember Aravella Simotas and other local officials, the procession marched from 34th Avenue down to Astoria Boulevard and 33rd Street.

The Grand Marshal of the parade, which is presented by the Federation of Italian American Organizations of Queens, Inc., was Minister Natalia Quintavalle, Italian Consul General of New York.

 

RECOMMENDED STORIES

City Council OKs Hallets Point development


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

File Photo

The development that would bring thousands of residential apartments, retail space and parkland to the Astoria waterfront at Hallets Point has gotten the final thumbs up.

The City Council voted on Wednesday, October 9 to approve the plan presented by Lincoln Equities Group, the company behind the estimated $1 billion complex called the Hallets Point project.

According to Councilmember Peter Vallone Jr., the City Council came to an agreement with developers to cut the “community supportive project” down to half its original size.

The new deal also includes $500,000 in city funded research to see the feasibility, engineering and design of a proposed ferry service in order to take the large number of incoming residents to and from the peninsula of Hallets Point.

“It’s going to bring development to an area that sorely needs it,” said Vallone.

The development group initially announced in 2012 it would build the seven multifamily residential towers made up of 2,200 units on the waterfront presently home to the NYCHA Astoria Houses.

Twenty percent of the apartments are expected to be affordable housing. The complex will also include retail space featuring an affordable supermarket, a bank, drugstores and restaurants.

Along with the building, the plan is expected to include a 100,000-square-foot public park, outfitted with pedestrian walkways and bike paths winding along the waterfront, giving the community better sight lines of the waterfront. The project will also create a spot for a K-8 public school.

In May, Community Board 1 voted unanimously to approve the plan. The City Planning Commission unanimously approved the plan in August and in July Borough President Helen Marshall approved the plan as well.

Construction is expected to begin in late 2014 or early 2015.

 

RECOMMENDED STORIES