Tag Archives: Councilmember Eric Ulrich

Councilmember wants poll site switch for Tudor Village voters


| mhayes@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Maggie Hayes

With the general election approaching, one candidate wants any and every voter at the polls.

The Board of Elections (BOE) rezoned Tudor Village voters two years ago from P.S. 63 in Ozone Park to P.S. 232 in Lindenwood. Councilmember Eric Ulrich, who is running for re-election, is requesting the BOE switch it back.

“The Board of Elections should be making it easier, not harder, for people to vote,” Ulrich said.

In order to get to P.S. 232, Tudor Village residents would have to cross the Belt Parkway. Ulrich said this task is “nearly impossible” without a car.

Ulrich said that since the change was made, voter turnout from the area has decreased and “residents remain concerned about their ability to make it to the polls in the future.”

Ulrich is running against Democrat Lew Simon in the November general election and wants the BOE to re-designate P.S. 63 as the Tudor Village voting site “as soon as possible” so residents can vote “without impediment in the upcoming election.”

“Tudor Village residents should be able to vote in their own neighborhood,” he said. “I hope the Board of Elections comes to their senses and reverses this decision before November.”

The BOE said as a result of a decision made by both Queens Commissioners, they have agreed to move forward in making the change and it will possibly in place by the general election.

 

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City Council overrides Bloomberg’s Community Safety Act veto


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Photo via Twitter / @MarkWeprin

The New York City Council voted to override Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s veto of the controversial Community Safety Act.

The act contains two bills, one that will create an inspector general to oversee the activities of the police department and have subpoena power, while the other bill will make it easier for people to sue the NYPD over racial profiling.

The racial profiling bill override passed 34-15 on Thursday and the inspector general bill override passed 39-10. The profiling measure will go into effect 90 days after the vote and the inspector general will be appointed by the new mayor in January.

Bloomberg expressed his disagreement with the override in a statement after the City Council meeting and vowed to fight the bills before they go in effect.

“Make no mistake; the communities that will feel the most negative impacts of these bills will be minority communities across our city, which have been the greatest beneficiaries of New York City’s historic crime reductions,” Bloomberg said. “It is a dangerous piece of legislation and we will ask the courts to step in before innocent people are harmed.”

Opponents of the bills believe that the NYPD doesn’t need to have another monitor and that the racial profiling bill will cause officers and the police department to be tied up in court, instead of fighting crime.

“The role to have permanent oversight of the police department belongs to the police commissioner, belongs to the City Council members who serve on the Public Safety Committee, which refused to pass these laws to begin with,” Councilmember Eric Ulrich said. “This is not going to lower crime; the only thing it’s going to lower is the moral of the police department.”

Councilmember Peter Vallone Jr., who was against the bills, missed the vote to move his daughters into the University of Notre Dame. “The city just became less safe,” Vallone tweeted.

Supporters of the bills believe that minorities were unfairly targeted by the stop-and-frisk policy and the bills were necessary to stop racial profiling.

“This vote for me is a very easy one,” Councilmember Mark Weprin said. “I have no choice but to vote what I believe in my heart. And I feel very strongly that this is a problem that needs to be addressed. This is a policy that needs to be reformed.”

Supporters also believe that the bill will improve relations between the cops and minorities.

“By reforming this policy, these residents will be less likely to second guess a police officer’s intentions and be more willing to help them in their investigation,” said Councilmember Leroy Comrie. “I am proud to vote with my colleagues in overturning the mayor’s veto and would like to thank them for helping to make this city a safer place to live.”

 

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Rockaway ferry service extended through January


| mhayes@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of the EDC

Ferry service between the Rockaways and Manhattan has been extended yet again, all the way through to next year, January 31, said Mayor Michael Bloomberg on Wednesday.

This is the third extension for the water travel service, which most recently was pushed through the summer to Labor Day.

Since its initial launch in November post-Sandy, Councilmember Donovan Richards said the ferry has become many residents preferred method of travel between boroughs.

“The ferry provides an affordable access means of transportation for residents, and it’s also helping our businesses survive,” said Assemblymember Phillip Goldfeder.

The ferry, operated by Seastreak, departs from Beach 108th Street and Beach Channel Drive and stops at Pier 11 in downtown Manhattan and charges $2 for a one-way trip. Since its beginnings, the service has allowed for more than 120,000 passenger trips, according to city officials.

“I haven’t said this too recently, but I want to thank Mayor Bloomberg for recognizing the struggles,” Goldfeder said.

He additionally said that there should be no concern over colder temperatures as fall and then winter approach.

“You look at ferry service across the city, and weather doesn’t affect ridership,” he said.

Goldfeder and Councilmember Eric Ulrich will host a press conference Thursday to call on mayoral candidates to support permanent ferry service.

Congressmember Gregory Meeks echoed this and said he hopes the city, based on its track record of previous extensions, will make “every effort to continue service beyond the January 2014 date.”

 

Updated Wednesday, August 21 at 3:35 p.m.

 

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Officials detail sand restoration plan for Rockaway Beach


| mhayes@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of NYC Mayor's Office's Flickr

Rockaway Beach is coming back, potentially better than before.

Mayor Michael Bloomberg joined the Army Corps of Engineers, city agency officials and various elected officials on Thursday, August 15 to detail the sand restoration plan for Rockaway Beach.

The plan’s first phase will replenish 600,000 cubic yards of sand, while the second phase restores 3.5 million cubic yards to the beach that Sandy washed away.

“Beaches are a crucial defense against flooding and coastal storms,” Bloomberg said. “Now we’re working hard to strengthen those defenses.”

The 600,000 cubic yards is being pumped from Beach 149th Street down to Beach 89th Street. Dredging material in the water, located at the Rockaway Inlet, will clear a navigation channel that “hasn’t been cleared in a long time” while also bringing in “good quality sand” for the beach, said Colonel Paul Owen of the Army Corps of Engineers.

The 3.5 million cubic yards will stretch down the peninsula to Beach 19th Street.

“There’s a lot to be done and there’s great work going on — and we have a lot more to do,” Owen said.

However, residents say the project is a long time coming. For years, groups such as the Friends of Rockaway Beach and various civic associations have advocated for beach protection.

“It’s unfortunate it took a natural disaster for so many people to wake up to the problems that we’ve been facing in Rockaway for so, so long,” said Assemblymember Phillip Goldfeder.

When the project is complete, estimated to be by next Memorial Day, Owen said the total will be more sand than the Rockaways has seen since about 1970.

A series of protective walls will also be installed from Beach 126th Street to Beach 149th Street, Bloomberg said.

“Together, these measures will not only reverse damage to the beach done by Sandy, they will make the beach stronger than it was before the storm,” he said.

The roughly $300 million project is funded by federal Sandy relief funds.

Community plans are also helping to rebuild the damaged boardwalk.

The Parks Department has hosted several meetings in various parts of the peninsula to discuss what is needed going forward.

Boardwalk designs will be presented to the community in September, with construction starting potentially by the end of the year, said Parks Commissioner Veronica White.

“When we open the beach next year, Rockaway will be better than ever and that is a day that I am truly looking forward to,” said Councilmember Eric Ulrich.

 

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Candidates come out to Rockaway Beach


| editorial@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Benjamin Fang

BENJAMIN FANG

Political candidates recently spoke at the Friends of Rockaway Beach forum, where they affirmed their commitment to address the needs of the Rockaway community.

Mayoral candidate Anthony Weiner headlined the forum for the district he once represented in Congress. Democratic mayoral candidates Comptroller John Liu, former Councilmember Sal Albanese and Republicans John Catsimatidis and Joe Lhota also made their cases to the voters.

Borough President candidates Melinda Katz and State Senator Tony Avella, Councilmember Eric Ulrich and his challengers Lew Simon and William Ruiz, and Public Advocate candidates Letitia James and Cathy Guerriero also addressed the packed room.

“We’re going to ask them to tell us their plans for our beaches, our boardwalk, our play areas,” said John Cori, co-president of Friends of Rockaway Beach and the organizer of the event. “We need to hold our elected officials accountable.”

The candidates talked about greater protection for the beach, improving transportation to and from Rockaway and giving the community a greater voice in City Hall.

Weiner, recently scandalized once more for “sexting,” slammed City Hall for creating “hipster-looking concessions” on the beach rather than restoring it. He also demanded extended ferry service, which is set to end by Labor Day.

“Rockaway might be this far away place to City Hall, but it won’t be if I’m mayor,” he said.
Katz then questioned the city’s readiness and response to Sandy, a topic the audience was hoping to discuss.

“Where are the double dunes that will protect the homes?” asked Katz. “Where’s the evacuation plan?”

She also talked about investing in the Rockaways and building it “better than it was.”
Avella blasted both Katz and Councilmember Peter Vallone Jr., two leading candidates for Borough President, for their voting records while in the City Council.

Avella’s plan for the Rockaways includes giving the area a railroad line, getting rid of tolls and 24 hours of bus service.

Ulrich touted his record in the City Council and stressed how participatory budgeting gave way to success.

“In those four-and-a-half years, I’ve been able to secure, with your help, millions and millions of dollars in capital improvements and programming for senior centers, for schools, for libraries, to keep our firehouses open,” he said.

His challenger, Simon, gave an impassioned speech about the devastated community and the need to rebuild it.

“There’s no boardwalk. There are no benches. There’s nothing here!” said Simon. “I want to be chair of the Parks and Recreation committee. I want to make sure our boardwalk is built.”

Other candidates for mayor and public advocate also courted the Rockaway vote and spoke about focusing on the Rockaways if elected.

 

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Community concerned over newly opened skate park


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/File Photos

Concerns about London Planetree Skate Park have been rolling since the facility opened a month go.

At a recent Woodhaven Residents’ Block Association (WRBA) meeting, neighbors shared their worries about safety in the park, which attracts droves of local skaters.

Some attendees asked for improved lighting on the outside of the park, located on Atlantic Avenue. Others suggested there a crosswalk should be installed to make it easier for young skaters to cross the street.

Presently, a long median splits traffic on the avenue, but there are no traffic lights to stop vehicles. Residents also say the median island is high, making it difficult for small children and disabled people to cross.

“There were very few isolated reported incidents, but there is no cause for alarm,” said Councilmember Eric Ulrich, who praised the park for its safety and popularity.

Ulrich said cutting the median for a crosswalk would be difficult because the median sits on top of a LIRR tunnel and utilities. But as for the suggested lighting the councilmember has already contacted the Department of Transportation (DOT) to inquire about adding more lights around the park.

That came as welcome news to Woodhaven resident Janet Forte, who said she recently saw a car almost hit two skaters on Atlantic Avenue. Forte believes it was difficult to see the skateboarders because of low visibility at night and because they were not wearing any reflective equipment.

“There are a lot of adults and teenagers going there,” Forte said. “I think we need to be proactive and not reactive. I don’t want to see anyone killed.”

“It’s a beautiful skate park” said Alex Blenkinsopp, communications director of the WRBA. “We are confident that these won’t be persistent problems.”

 

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Attorney general investigating Sandy charity money


| mhayes@queenscourier.com

Sandy relief money is reportedly being kept under lock and key.

Attorney General Eric Schneiderman released a preliminary report on Wednesday, July 17 detailing how charities have spent more than half a billion dollars of Sandy donations. At least $238 million of the more than $575 million had not been spent as of April of this year, according to the report.

“All one needs to do is look around Breezy Point to realize what a travesty [this] is,” said Arthur Lighthall, president of the Breezy Point Cooperative.

Councilmember Eric Ulrich echoed Lighthall, saying “sitting on this money while so many people are still in need is an insult.”

The report also asks whether some of the funds reportedly spent on Sandy were actually used for non-storm-related purposes.

“We have a responsibility to the people who donated their hard-earned money to help our community rebuild to make sure that the contributions they made were used as advertised,” Schneiderman said.

The Attorney General’s Charities Bureau, which regulates all state charities, reviewed the Sandy contributions and found that 58 percent of donations had gone to storm relief efforts; 17 organizations reported potentially using funds for non-Sandy purposes such as preventing future disasters; and responding organizations granted half of the $336 million they had received to other organizations.

“This funding is urgently needed and we cannot accept that charitable donations are not being spent as intended,” Ulrich said.

Schneiderman’s Charities Bureau is heightening its review of Sandy fundraising and seeking more detailed answers from the responding charities, including a clearer account of how money has been spent and plans for remaining funds.

“My constituents are not assisted by monies collected for victims of Sandy that are not distributed,” said State Senator Joseph Addabbo. “These funds are useless unless given to those who [are] truly in need.”

 

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Zimmerman verdict reaction felt from Florida to Queens


| mhayes@queenscourier.com

From television to the streets to social media, people all over the nation — and the borough — are reacting to the not-guilty verdict in the George Zimmerman trial.

The trial against Zimmerman in the killing of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin lasted roughly three weeks. In the end, on Saturday, July 13, the defendant was acquitted of second-degree murder based on reasonable doubt.

Last year, Zimmerman, a member of the neighborhood watch in his Florida community, said he saw Martin walking at night acting suspiciously. Zimmerman, who was armed, pursued Martin. After an exchange, the details of which took center stage at the trial, Zimmerman shot Martin in what he said was self-defense.

Congressmember Gregory Meeks, a former prosecutor, said he understands “in detail” how the criminal justice system works and that no matter the case’s circumstances, “neither the presentation of the evidence or the evidence are always accurate predictors of a jury’s decision.”

“Our justice system says we must abide by a jury’s decision,” he said. “But abiding by a jury’s decision does not require that we agree with it.”

Similarly, Congressmember Hakeem Jeffries denounced the verdict.

“Once again, the court system has failed to deliver justice in a racially-tinged matter that involves the killing of an innocent, unarmed African-American male,” he said.

Councilmember Eric Ulrich was one of many who took to Twitter to share their views on the verdict and spoke in favor of the courts.

“[The] Zimmerman verdict is proof that innocence until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt is still the cornerstone of the justice system,” he said. “The rights of the accused cannot be compromised by the court of public opinion. Everyone is entitled to a fair trial.”

Ulrich also said he was “extremely disappointed with the amount of race baiting [sic] and political pandering” on the social media site.
Protestors flooded city streets Sunday night following the verdict to express their opposition to the acquittal.

State Senator James Sanders held a panel discussion analyzing legal aspects of the trial and events that led to the murder, including how to move forward to “ensure that an injustice like this does not happen again.”

Jeffries, Meeks and other elected officials held a press conference on Monday, July 15 to request the Department of Justice consider prosecuting Zimmerman for civil rights violations. The NAACP has called for the same measure.

 

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Redone London Plane Tree Park opens to skateboarders


| tcullen@queenscourier.com

SKATE 03

It was a great day to skate in Queens.

The newly redone London Plane Tree Park, on the border of Woodhaven and Ozone Park, opened on Sunday with a ribbon cutting by officials and skateboarders.

The $1.6 million project, which started about a year ago, included full renovations, more greenery and exercise equipment around the park.

“It’s a great design,” said Assemblymember Mike Miller. “It’s a lot of green space that’s good for other people who just want to come and sit. It’s a great day.”

Borough President Helen Marshall allocated $1 million toward the project, with Councilmember Eric Ulrich pitching in the additional $600,000.

Deputy Borough President Barry Grodenchik, who is also Marshall’s Parks liaison, credited the beep’s work in helping to make the city’s parks some of the best.

“The borough president has done her share and I like to think she has done more than her share,” he said. “She has allocated over $183 million to the parks. We are delighted to work very closely with parks to make sure things happen on a timely basis.”

Ulrich said while the project was three years in the making, people in the neighborhood had wanted something better for London Plane Tree for quite some time.

“There really wasn’t a full utilization of this space,” he said. “Many of the children and the young adults who enjoy skateboarding were forced to play in the Pathmark parking lot, much to the dissatisfaction of the people on 95th Avenue.”

Community Board 9 Chair Jim Coccovillo touted what parks can do not just for skateboarders, but the whole community.

“Be safe, that’s what the park is here for,” he said. “You meet people, you make lifetime friends. And with that, you keep the community solid and safe.”


Community Board 9 chair Jim Coccovillo, Queens Parks Commissioner Dorothy Lewandowski, Councilmember Eric Ulrich, Deputy Borough President Barry Grodenchik, Assemblymember Mike Miller and Community Board 9 Parks Committee chair Richard Smith cut the ribbon on the revamped London Plane Tree Park.

 

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American Softball starts second season helping developmentally disabled of Queens


| tcullen@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photos by Terence M. Cullen

Randy Novick asked which hand the player threw with.

He held up his left hand, which was already gripping a softball. Novick, patient and personable, found a glove that fit. As he adjusted it for the player’s hand, Novick recalled a visit to the man’s group home and how much he had enjoyed it.

It was just another Saturday as American Softball entered its second full season after Novick revived it last year. The league works with five group homes for mentally disabled people throughout Queens. There are about 50 players who all get a chance to hit, run the bases and play the field.

“The players are just happy to play because the rules are, there are no  rules,” he said. “It’s nice to get to see the players do something they normally wouldn’t do.”

This year, it was easier to get started for Novick. Last season, he had problems finding a field and getting funding.

He said he hopes the league can one day expand citywide or even across the country.

Novick, a Howard Beach resident, credited State Senator Joseph Addabbo and Councilmember Eric Ulrich for supporting his efforts. The organizer recruited coaches from counselors to childhood friends who wanted to lend a hand.

Addison John, a counselor at Services for the UnderServed, said clients normally start looking forward to the game by the middle of the week. Services for the UnderServed provides support for individuals with mental illness and other challenges.

“They love it,” John said. “As Friday comes, they’re ready to go.”

The coaches include Dore DeQuattro, a musician and lifelong friend of Novick’s. DeQuattro said he has enjoyed being able to give personal attention to the players. He added while his band regularly plays for the developmentally disabled, the league lets him get to work with individuals on a one-on-one basis.

“I just love these guys,” he said. “I love to give them a little extra personal attention.”

 

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Cross Bay Diner back in business after Sandy closure


| tcullen@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photos  by Terence M. Cullen

Order up!

The Cross Bay Diner reopened on Friday, May 24 after being closed nearly seven months due to Sandy damage.

The diner’s reopening marks another step forward for the community as fewer businesses remain shuttered due to the storm.

Michael Siderakis, the owner of Cross Bay Diner, State Senator Joseph Addabbo, Councilmember Eric Ulrich and community members Frances Scarantino and Frank Gulluscio cut the ribbon to mark the popular eatery’s reopening.

Cross Bay Diner owner Michael Siderakis and State Senator Joseph Addabbo.

 

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Juvenile Diabetes Walk-A-Thon raises $70,000 toward cure


| tcullen@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Terence M. Cullen

They are $70,000 closer to a cure.

On Saturday, May 18, the Fifth Annual South Queens Juvenile Diabetes Walk-A-Thon to Cure Diabetes, organized by the International Society of Saints Cosma and Damiano, raised $70,000. All of the funds will go directly to juvenile diabetes research.

The Howard Beach Kiwanis Club, one of many organizations involved, donated a $500 check to the cause.

The walk was emceed by KTU’s own Goumba Johnny. The kickoff featured fun and games for all ages at the Ave Maria Catholic Academy in Old Howard Beach.

“We’re going to walk for a cure for diabetes and it starts here,” the host said. “And we’re doing it every year until we find a cure.”

Walk organizer Joe De Candia said this year has been tough for everyone in the neighborhood because of Sandy, but the community still came out to give their support.

“Everybody knows the devastation this area has gone through in the last six months.” De Candia said.

“And it was a little tough for everybody to get through, but this is a worthwhile cause we all fight for.”

Co-organizer Joe Mure said the day was about the children who suffer daily from the disease, and promised those present a cure was on the way.

“I promise you,” he said. “We’re working, we’re taking a step closer to finding a cure and hopefully we’ll be there one day soon.”

Councilmember Eric Ulrich applauded the work of De Candia and Mure for organizing the walk and looked forward to the day juvenile diabetes is no longer a problem.

“But until that day comes we must do everything that we can,” he said. “We must walk, we must raise awareness and we must fund the necessary research to find a cure.”

 

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Six months after Sandy, Charles Park gets clean-up


| tcullen@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/File phoot

Frank M. Charles Memorial Park is getting spruced up.

With Sandy debris lingering nearly six months after the storm, Councilmember Eric Ulrich has partnered with the Doe Fund to help clean up the community park, which is run under the auspices of by Gateway National Recreation Area.

Nine “men in blue” from the Doe Fund, which finds work for homeless men and women, will help remove debris in what is considered a neighborhood park, although it’s under the National Park Service (NPS) umbrella.

Ulrich said he reached out to George McDonald, president and founder of the Doe Fund, after coverage of the park’s worsened condition following the storm.

“This was a reaction to the published newspaper reports about the terrible conditions in Charles Park,” Ulrich said.

The councilmember said further pressure had to be put on NPS to secure that Charles Park and other parts of Gateway get the same attention that parks across the country do.

“It’s an absolute disgrace,” Ulrich said of the delayed clean up, adding it should not have taken a storm like Sandy to bring the park’s conditions to the public eye. “The federal government has to live up to their obligation.”

McDonald, who partnered with Ulrich to bring workers to Broad Channel after the storm, said the program won’t only clean up the park, but give the crew a second chance.

“For the past 25 years, New Yorkers have been so generous to The Doe Fund and to the ‘men in blue’—helping their fellow New Yorkers to re-establish their careers and become fathers to their children,” McDonald said. “We are grateful for the opportunity to give back. I thank Councilmember Ulrich for thinking of us.”

Community Board 10 recently voiced opposition to a proposal from Gateway and NYC Parks Department that listed Charles Park as a possible site for concession stands, bike terminals or kayak launching bays. Board members first want the park to be cleaned up, and get more outreach from Gateway, before anything else comes in.

“It’s my understanding that Doe fund is volunteering labor to do it, which is certainly commendable,” said board chair Elizabeth Braton. “However, it does not remove the obligation of the Parks Service to provide continuous, ongoing maintenance at the facilities they are responsible for.”

 

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New York Families for Autistic Children opens center after Sandy setback


| editorial@queenscourier.com

Ribboncutting

BY LIAM LA GUERRE

Richard Henry moved to New York City two months ago in search of a new autism facility for his daughter.

Fortunately, he won’t have to look any further.

After a six-month delay following Sandy, about 200 parents, children, staff members and politicians attended the grand opening of the $5.9 million New York Families for Autistic Children (NYFAC) center in Howard Beach on April 7.

Henry, an Ozone Park resident, is only 10 minutes away from the center by car.

“My daughter will be really happy coming to a place like this, because she doesn’t have to travel long distance,” Henry, 62, said.

Last October, Sandy flooded the first floor of the facility, destroying walls, furniture and electrical equipment. It forced the center to close its doors about two weeks before it was even set to open.

The post-storm renovation cost a little more than $200,000, mostly to repair damages, but also to replace appliances, according to NYFAC president Andrew Baumann.

Baumann was able to pay for the damages by borrowing money from New York Community Bank. The building now has flood insurance, he said, which it did not before Sandy.

“It’s definitely a dream come true,” Baumann said. “It’s been a long, hard road.”

Assemblymember Phillip Goldfeder secured $100,000 in the state budget to help cover the cost of rebuilding the center. He believes the facility represents the community’s rebuilding as a whole.

“We’re not done here, there is a lot of work to do,” Goldfeder said. “But it’s just a tremendous symbol for the community of strength, unity, stability and that we’re going to come back.”

The entire building is self-sufficient and environmentally friendly, running only on energy from giant solar panels on the roof.

On the first floor, there are rooms for meetings, video and board games, showers, first aid, an instrument-filled music room and a fully-loaded kitchen.

The second floor has administrative offices, a 16-seat conference room, a training room, an evaluation room and a television studio, so the center can create its own shows.

“This is going to be a wonderful resource for the families affected by autism,” said Councilmember Eric Ulrich. “It’s going to be a one-stop shop for people to get support, to get the services they need … and to get help.”

The next step for the center is to build a gym above the parking lot. The $2 million project will include fitness machines, a basketball court inside and a volleyball court on the roof outside, Baumann said.

But for now the center is focused on providing services to people with autism.

“It was important that they opened their doors to those children and families in need of assistance,” said Senator Joseph Addabbo. “It was never a question of if it was going to open, it was when.”

Check out more photos from the NYFAC grand opening here

 

 

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Ozone Park project to fix crumbling infrastructure


| tcullen@queenscourier.com

A multimillion dollar project will rebuild some of Ozone Park’s crumbling infrastructure.

Councilmember Eric Ulrich announced the $45 million plan at the Ozone Park Civic Association’s March meeting.

The three-year project, starting in March 2014, would focus on new and upgraded sewage systems, street signs and traffic lights, according to Ulrich’s office. Final designs are expected to be completed this June, with a contract to develop the project planned for this December.

It would affect Albert Road from Cross Bay Boulevard to North Conduit Avenue and 150th Road from 95th Street to Centerville Street, according to the Daily News.

Ozone Civic President Howard Kamph said the project has been more than 30 years in the making and hopes it won’t be put off any more.

“It’s a project in need very badly,” he said. “I just hope they’re not delaying any longer than they’ve been delaying.”

Because of flooding and other problems, Kamph said potholes are normally fixed quickly but will wash out after only a few weeks. In the past the city would “just patch up the hole. Just come three weeks later and the potholes are open again,” he said.

“The people of Ozone Park have been waiting for this project for 30 years and I’m thrilled that their patience will finally pay off,” Ulrich said. “This project will do so much to make Centerville a better place to live and positively affect property values in the process.”

 

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