Tag Archives: Councilmember Elizabeth Crowley

Local leaders unhappy over rumored Ridgewood Walmart


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Walmart

Local leaders pledged to stonewall Walmart amid rumors the retail giant is eyeing Ridgewood for its first New York City location.

The company has tried to open a location in the city for years, but resistance from public officials and civic leaders has forced it to reconsider. Recent reports have hinted that the company is looking at vacant lots and sites in Ridgewood, and public officials and community leaders are not happy.

“Walmart has a long, documented history of mistreating its workers and driving out local small businesses,” said Councilmember Elizabeth Crowley, whose district includes Ridgewood. “Bringing in this store would negatively impact both the commercial and residential areas in Ridgewood.”

Walmart’s opponents say the retail giant provides low-income, part-time jobs and forces small businesses to close because they cannot compete with the chain’s low prices.

Bertha Lewis, president of the Black Institute, a nonprofit organization that advocates for minority communities, said her group is gearing up for a war against Walmart to prevent a store from opening anywhere in the city. The group is planning to rally and boycott as well as ask public officials to step up pressure against the mega store.

It is not known whether Walmart is considering a full size, 182,000-square-foot “supercenter” or a smaller Walmart Express measuring about 15,000-square-feet for the city.
Lewis does not approve of either.

“If they put a Walmart Express, it’s like one little bed bug,” she said. “Then in a few blocks there’ll be another bed bug and another and before you know it we’ll be infested [...] We will bring the ruckus and we will bring the noise. We are not playing with these people and we are not afraid of them.”

Nevertheless, a 2011 NY1-Marist poll showed that 64 percent of Queens residents would like a Walmart in their neighborhood, with 76 percent of those supporters saying they would be likely to shop there.

Also last year, residents throughout the city spent more than $215 million at Walmart stores outside city limits. New York is also the top metro market for Walmart.com sales in the country, according to Steven Restivo, the company’s director of communications.

“New Yorkers want us here and residents continue to go out of their way to shop our stores outside the city,” Restivo said.

He added that Walmart creates jobs, citing Chicago, which has nine chains and employs nearly 2,000 people.

Restivo confirmed that the retail giant is still looking for a place to set up shop in the five boroughs, but did not specify whether Ridgewood was on the list.

This would not be the first time the company has tried to enter Queens. In 2005, the chain moved to include a store in Rego Park’s shopping center, but developer Vornado Realty Trust dropped the plans after opposition from the community, according to reports.

 

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Forest Park Carousel becomes official landmark


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photos by Johann Hamilton

The century-old Forest Park Carousel will be ridden for many generations to come now that it is an official New York City landmark.

The Landmark Preservation Commission (LPC) made the classic Woodhaven ride a city treasure and ensured its preservation with a unanimous 8-0 vote on Tuesday, June 25.

“This designation is long overdue, but now that it’s here, we’re thrilled,” said Edward Wendell, president of the Woodhaven Residents’ Block Association. The association is one of the groups that have been fighting to get the carousel landmarked.

“With the carousel landmarked, we know it will be around for posterity, which is exactly how it should be.”
The carousel was shuttered from 2008 to 2012. Last year, New York Carousel Entertainment LLC, which also owns the carousel in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, decided to buy and revitalize it.

The carousel joins a small group of landmarked rides operating in the city. The other two are the Cyclone roller coaster and Deno’s Wonder Wheel in Coney Island.

“This is great news,” said Shirley Sullivan, a local resident. “I actually thought the carousel was a landmark all along. I don’t see any reason why it shouldn’t be.”

But not all residents felt the same way as Sullivan.

“I know it’s been here for a while and everyone loves it and it has a lot of history,” said Mathis Johnston. “But I think the title of landmark should be saved for things with actual historical significance, not just things that have been around for a long time.”

The carousel was crafted in 1910 by master carver Daniel Carl Muller. In 1973, it was brought to Forest Park. The ride features vibrant horses, lions and tigers and paintings depicting settings in Woodhaven and other parts of Queens.

“Designating the Forest Park Carousel is a tremendous win for our community that once feared it may never spin again,” said Councilmember Elizabeth Crowley, who lobbied LPC to designate the carousel. “Preserving our history strengthens our neighborhoods.”

 

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Pols push for sewer upgrades as Queens homes take on water


| mchan@queenscourier.com

Photos courtesy of Jim Gallagher

An outdated sewer system is leaving large swathes of Queens vulnerable to serious flooding, according to a pair of elected officials.

“Year after year, Queens residents have been fighting the trauma and financial burden of flood damage to their homes and lives,” said Assemblymember Nily Rozic. “We cannot continue to let our working families weather the storm alone.”

For decades, poor infrastructure in Fresh Meadows has caused basements and garages to flood with sewage during heavy rainstorms, local leaders said.

“If we have a torrential downpour, all the water gets backed up,” said Jim Gallagher, president of the Fresh Meadows Homeowners Civic Association.

He added that sewer pipes in the neighborhood can only handle about an inch and a half of water per hour. Any more rainfall causes water to pour into homes.

The problem also extends to Glendale, where rainy weather shut down the flood-prone Cooper Avenue underpass last weekend.

The closure between 74th Street and 69th Road was due to “construction and the anticipation of flooding,” according to city alerts. It lasted from Friday afternoon to Saturday night.

Last August, three residents were caught in a deluge there. Cars were submerged under several feet of water and emergency responders had to rescue the trio.

A spokesperson for Councilmember Elizabeth Crowley said the city’s Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) plans to add new catch basins to the underpass, but the department has not committed to major infrastructure improvements.

Thousands in southeast Queens say they have also been suffering from mold spores and flooding since the city took over the water supply in 1996.

According to DEP spokesperson Christopher Gilbride, the city has “invested hundreds of millions of dollars upgrading the sewer system in Queens” over the last decade and will continue to make improvements.

But Rozic and Public Advocate Bill de Blasio last week said they wanted the department to speed up the sewers upgrades and reexamine reimbursement policies for homeowners until then.

“Put simply, severe weather is the new normal,” they wrote in a joint letter to DEP Commissioner Carter Strickland.

The pair urged the department to make flood-prone neighborhoods a priority in capital plans and expedite short-term flood mitigation measures like street landscaping to reduce storm runoff.

“After the wake-up call Sandy delivered, there’s just no excuse for inaction,” de Blasio said. “We can’t keep leaving families high and dry.”

Yolanda Gallagher of Fresh Meadows shows how high flood levels reached in Utopia Parkway homes after a storm last August.

 

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Community activist Craig Caruana kicks off Republican run in District 30 Council race


| mhayes@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Craig Caruana

The race to represent District 30 on the City Council is on, with community activist and Middle Village native Craig Caruana throwing his hat in the ring for the Republican ticket.

Caruana is a member of organizations including the Knights of Columbus at Resurrection Ascension Parish, the Kiwanis Club of Glendale and the Juniper Park Civic Association.

Top issues on Caruana’s website include discretionary spending, stopping the increase in property taxes, bringing more healthcare options to the district, enhancing education, increasing small business support and reforming street parking.

“Someone has to start taking responsibility for the issues that are affecting all of our lives,” Caruana said.

The activist hopes to bring tax dollars back to the district and restore funding to civic and volunteer groups, schools, fire houses and police stations. He is also seeking to fight water rate increases by the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP).

“DEP plans on increasing our water rate for years to come,” Caruana said. “Politicians should be telling us this plain truth, instead of pretending to be surprised year after year.”

Councilmember Eric Ulrich said his fellow Republican will bring passion to the 30th District.

“District 30 needs a fighter right now,” he said. “I know that when he’s voting on legislation that’s going to impact our quality of life, that he’s going to be the strongest advocate.”

Caruana faces incumbent Democrat Councilmember Elizabeth Crowley.

 

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Glendale underpass fix will ease flood problem


| mhayes@queenscourier.com

A deteriorating Glendale underpass is getting a makeover. Come summer, it will be safer for both cars passing underneath and trains chugging overhead.

However, the community says there are still issues in the area that need to be addressed.

The Department of Design and Construction (DDC) took on the current $6 million capital reconstruction project in January 2012 on behalf of the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) and the Department of Transportation (DOT). As of February, 65 percent of the work had been completed.

For the project, DDC is rebuilding the underpass’ retaining wall and installing new sidewalks along with six catch basins underneath.

“The retaining walls were in a state of disrepair,” a DDC spokesperson said. “We’re building a brand new underpass with new concrete walls, and we’re also installing additional catch basins to help remove storm water more quickly.”

However, community members are concerned about the potential for excess storm water.

“I don’t believe [this project] is going to do anything near what needs to be done to solve flooding problems in the Glendale community during heavy rains,” said Gary Giordano, district manager of Community Board 5.

Giordano recalled two incidents in which the underpass area collected a significant amount of water, once reaching 12 feet.

Giordano said possible fixes include enlarging the sewer line or installing a retainer tank to hold storm water until sewer plants can handle it.

“These rains are getting stronger and more frequent,” he said.

The community has been in talks with Councilmember Elizabeth Crowley and the DEP to resolve the issue.

Still, community members are glad about the DDC project.

“Panels on top of the retaining walls in some areas were so deteriorated, you could see the steel beneath,” said Giordano. “You don’t want those falling down on the street.”

 

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Street signs unveiled in Ridgewood North Historic District


| mhayes@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of the Office of Councilmember Elizabeth Crowley

New street signs indicate that Ridgewood North is making history.

The area, constructed at the turn of the 20th century, consists of nearly 100 apartment buildings commonly referred to as the Mathews Flats. At the time of their construction, the buildings were seen as a step forward from the overcrowded, unsanitary conditions associated with Manhattan tenement housing.

The apartments are credited with transforming Ridgewood into a middle-class, urban neighborhood, according to Councilmember Elizabeth Crowley.

“The Mathews Flats are an important part of the city’s history,” she said. “This historic district designation ensures that the architecture and historical significance of these buildings will be preserved.”

The signs were unveiled on Thursday, April 18 at a ceremony with Crowley, Councilmember Diana Reyna, New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) Chair Robert Tierney, New York Landmarks Preservation Foundation Chair Christina Davis and community residents. The foundation funded the initiative.

“This is a very exciting day for the community to gather together and celebrate this historic district in their neighborhood,” said Davis.

The district, bound by Forest Avenue, Fairview Avenue, Gates Avenue and Woodbine Street, is the third historic area in Ridgewood. It gained the designation from LPC in September 2009. It was approved by the City Council the following month.

“The historical district designation recognizes the deep cultural legacy that exists in Ridgewood and will preserve this legacy for generations to come,” said Reyna.

The LPC is also considering a proposal to make Central Ridgewood a historic district, The area is bound by Forest Avenue, Fresh Pond Road, Woodbine Street and 71st Avenue. The project would protect about 940 intact brick row houses built by German Americans in the early 1900s.

 

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More shops, other changes coming to Atlas Park


| mhayes@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Macerich

A Glendale shopping center is scheduled for a makeover, ready for residents to enjoy this coming summer.

The Shops at Atlas Park, which has struggled in recent years, announced the addition of two popular retail stores, Forever 21 and Charlotte Russe. Construction has also begun to update the property’s signature Center Green open space.

“We are investing in The Shops at Atlas Park as an appealing centerpiece for this part of Queens,” said Liza Diaz, property manager for the site. “Our vision is to create not only a fine shopping destination with great dining options, but to establish a community gathering spot with the Center Green.”

Macerich, a real estate investment trust, acquired ownership of the mall in 2011. In the past, residents have expressed frustration regarding store selection, but hope for a revamped center still remains.

“Atlas Park has the potential to be a great economic engine for Glendale and the surrounding communities” said Councilmember Elizabeth Crowley. “Macerich has a proven record developing malls, and I believe the new stores and outdoor performance space will bring new life to Atlas Park.”

The center court area will include new, movable glass kiosks for seasonal and specialty merchandise, as well as a 10,000-square-foot area designated for community events and live performances. Roughly 100 new parking spots will be added to the area, intended to improve convenience for shoppers and diners.

Developers believe that the retailer additions are a “real fit for the dynamic community” of Glendale. This addition is just the first of many that Macerich hopes to make as it enhances the mall’s retail lineup, as well as other attractions.

“This community is looking for a retail, dining and entertainment destination that feels modern, comfortable and family-friendly,” said Diaz.

 

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Firefighters help fellow FDNY members still recovering from Sandy


| mhayes@queenscourier.com

Photos courtesy of the Friends of Firefighters

Firefighters, despite their ever-heroic actions, were not spared during Sandy’s rage.

Many active and retired members of the FDNY lost their homes during the storm, and the Friends of Firefighters (FoF), a nonprofit group that offers wellness services for firefighters and their families, opened up an additional location in Glendale to care for those in need. But nearly four months after the storm, the group is still supplying families who lost everything with essential items.

“[Firefighters] are out there every day, putting their lives on the line for us,” said Meghan Zichelli, operations manager at FoF. “Most of them, their homes were affected by Sandy, so it makes our mission even more important; to help this community that’s out there helping us.”

When the storm hit, FoF’s base site in Brooklyn was severely damaged. The group needed an additional site to distribute donations to FDNY families in need.

Initially, they collected donations in a volunteer’s home, but with the mountainous influx of items, they quickly outgrew the space.

Councilmember Elizabeth Crowley contacted Macerich, the owners of the Shops at Atlas Park in Glendale. Macerich donated the space previously occupied by Stein Mart to FoF, and volunteers are still there today.

“The families need even more assistance during this rough time,” said Zichelli. “To make the help convenient for them and easily accessible is very important.”

FoF has helped over 400 firefighters and their families since the storm, and will continue to do so. The same volunteers work the site, and Zichelli said that provides a sense of comfort and familiarity for the families who keep coming back for more.

“They’re still coming to get anything from baby diapers and formula, to bleach and cleaning supplies, to shovels and other tools,” she said.

The Glendale site is currently open every Thursday and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. for both donation drop-offs and pick-ups. To learn more, call FoF at 718-643-1240 or visit friendsoffirefighters.org.

 

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Study to see if power lines should be underground


| mhayes@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of the Office of Elizabeth Crowley

When storms rip through the borough, areas such as Middle Village are subject to countless power outages. But new legislation could provide a solution.

The bill, recently passed by the City Council, allows the Office of Long-Term Planning and Sustainability (OLTPS) to conduct a study to determine whether power lines can be moved underground, protecting them from high winds and fallen trees.

“It doesn’t take a severe storm for [residents] to experience power outages,” said Councilmember Elizabeth Crowley, who has been fighting for this cause since 2010. “Personally, I don’t think there even needs to be a study.”

Crowley also sees this issue as a “tale of two cities,” in which Manhattan has had underground power lines for years, and Queens received the short end of the stick.

“Manhattan is treated differently than the rest of the city,” said Crowley. “People pay the same amount [for maintenance], but get different services.”

Power lines around Glendale as well have literally sparked problems: Crowley recalled a home that caught fire because of overhead electrical wires. Above ground lines can also disrupt the integrity of surrounding trees, which are often cut to make space for the wires. That makes the trees weaker and more susceptible to falling down in a storm, she noted.

There is no set timeline for the study. If approved, Crowley hopes this could also spur power companies to move lines in areas citywide.

 

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Final redistricting lines released


| tcullen@queenscourier.com

Queens_Feb6

The final district lines that will go before the City Council were released on Monday, February 4, with moderate changes to the map that was released just two months ago. The new maps were released two days before the Districting Commission was to vote on the lines and discuss the changes district-by-district and borough-by-borough.

Several neighborhoods opposed the lines released in early December, mainly insisting the plans would divide neighborhoods and certain demographics. Independent residents and civic organizations made their unhappiness known at several hearings.

The Woodhaven Residents’ Block Association (WRBA) opposed the December map, as the neighborhood would continue to be divided between two councilmembers. The district currently represented by Councilmember Elizabeth Crowley was essentially flipped with that represented by Councilmember Eric Ulrich.

Members spoke out against the lines at a January 14 hearing. WRBA President Ed Wendell said he was disappointed, but realized at this point change probably would not have come. He said the WRBA would “have to work twice as hard to get our elected officials’ attention.”

Kris Gounden, an Ozone Park resident who’s been active in the West Indian community, said he was disappointed that parts of South Ozone Park were still incorporated into the 32nd District, despite pleas by residents.

“We want someone that’s born of us,” he said. “That looks like us. That’s more likely to speak of our own interest.

 

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Record low fire fatalities, ambulance response time in 2012


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

In 2012, there was a record low of 58 civilian fire deaths in New York City.

Last year was a banner year for public safety, say officials.

In 2012, the FDNY had the fewest civilian fire deaths and fastest average ambulance response times for life-threatening medical emergencies in New York City history, announced Mayor Michael Bloomberg and Fire Commissioner Salvatore Cassano.

“With record low number of murders and shootings and the fewest fire deaths in our city’s history, 2012 was a historic year for public safety,” said Bloomberg.

Last year there were 58 fire deaths, a decline of 12 percent compared to 2011, four fewer fatalities than the previous record set in 2010, and a 43 percent decline since 2001.

There were not working smoke detectors in most of the fire deaths in 2012, and the top causes were accidental electrical fires, smoking, incendiary fires and cooking related.

Structural fire response time in 2012, at 4:04, was two seconds higher than the previous year, but that was partially due to Superstorm Sandy, said the FDNY.

During the storm, there were 21 serious fires that destroyed around 200 homes and businesses, including more than 120 homes in Breezy Point.

At 6:31, EMS response time improved despite a 3.4 percent increase in call volume, breaking the record low set in 2010.

Councilmember Elizabeth Crowley, chair of the City Council’s fire committee, stressed that these records might not have been set without efforts from the city council to fight the mayor’s proposed closing of as many as 20 fire companies.

“We can’t afford cuts to firehouses, and I will continue working with my colleagues to ensure the FDNY receives the required resources to keep us safe,” said Crowley.

 

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Civic Virtue statue leaves Queens


| tcullen@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Terence Cullen

The controversial statue, officially called “Triumph of Civic Virtue,” which stirred debate for the last few years, was hoisted from its pedestal on Queens Boulevard just before 5 p.m. on Saturday, December 15 as bystanders looked on — many of whom were saddened by the action.

It has been moved to Green-Wood Cemetery in Brooklyn effectively leaving the borough on loan to the cemetery. Many have opposed the move for several reasons, particularly though for its artistic value and the manner in which it was moved.

A week before the move, which took close to 10 hours of preparation, Councilmembers Peter Vallone and Elizabeth Crowley joined with Community Board 9 and Triumph of Civic Virtue to rally against the move. The coalition alleged that those opposed had purposely been stymied from attending a November 13 hearing on the move to Green-Wood.

And just days before, Community Board 9 voted to oppose the planned move, also citing that the aged statue was a work of public art, given to Queens more than 70 years ago and should be preserved as such. The statue should have been restored and kept in Queens, said Community Board 9 chair Andrea Crawford.

See more photos of the statue’s removal

    

BOE mailers gave wrong poll sites


| tcullen@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Councilmember Elizabeth Crowley's office

Some mailers sent out by the Board of Elections (BOE) last month telling voters they had new stations may have given the incorrect address, officials said.

Mailers had originally been sent out to inform voters that some stations had changed in correspondence with new district lines. A number of these sites were wrong.

The BOE was under pressure to get the mailers out between August 1 and 5, said BOE spokesperson Valerie Vasquez, and some voting sites were incorrect as a result.

“In these instances, poll site change notices were immediately sent to every voter affected informing of their correct poll site,” she said. Councilmember Elizabeth Crowley said she noticed the flub right away and immediately called the BOE to find out what had happened. Her staff has been reaching out to voters to encourage them to call the BOE to confirm their new ballot site.

“A week from now, voters from all over New York City may be going to the wrong polling site because the Board of Elections mailed them the incorrect information,” she said.

Crowley was one of several Queens officials to sign a letter from Public Advocate Bill DiBlasio that insisted the BOE remedy the mishap as soon as possible.

“If we can’t even get people to the right poll site to vote, we are really up the creek,” DiBlasio. “The Board of Elections has to make this right. Fast.”

 

– With additional reporting by Melissa Chan

Queens’ Morning Roundup


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Rangel, Long, Meng, Jeffries, Velazquez Declared Winners In Primaries 

According to AP numbers as of 12:30 a.m., Meng had 51 percent of the vote with 89 percent of precincts reporting. Assemblyman Rory Lancman had 28 percent, Councilwoman Elizabeth Crowley had 16 percent and Dr. Robert Mittman had 5 percent. Read more: [NY1] 

Rapper 50 Cent Involved in LIE Crash 

Rapper 50 Cent is out of the hospital after an accident with a tractor trailer. The accident happened just before midnight Tuesday on the Long Island Expressway. A spokesperson for the rapper, also known as Curtis Jackson, said he was treated for minor back and neck injuries at New York Hospital Queens. Read more: [NY1] 

Congregation Ahavath Shalom Synagogue in Forest Hills loses relics in burglary 

Religious artifacts were swiped from a Queens synagogue sometime in the past week, and the thief is still on the lam, cops said. The four objects — including a silver pointer, Torah breast plate, silver-coated plate and a ritual wine cup — were discovered missing Monday from the Congregation Ahavath Shalom Synagogue on 113th St. in Forest Hills, according to officials. Read more: [New York Daily News] 

Students once again learn to cook with acclaimed chefs as web show ‘Culinary High TV’ debuts its third season

A Queens producer is in talks to turn a popular web series, that teaches at-risk teens how to cook in some of the city’s top restaurants, into a television show. The third season of “Culinary High TV” debuts Friday on the show’s website. Read more: [New York Daily News] 

 

Social Security at center of 6th District contention


| mchan@queenscourier.com

Rory Lancman

A congressional candidate — who dubbed himself the sole fighter for the Millionaire’s Tax last week — set himself apart from his Democratic primary opponents once more by saying he is “the only candidate” in the race with a real plan to save Social Security.

“Social Security is in crisis,” said Assemblymember Rory Lancman, who is vying for the heavily-contested and newly-redrawn 6th District seat. “There are other candidates in the race who don’t seem to believe so. They think it’s something that we don’t need to address right away. They don’t see the imminence of the problem.”

According to Lancman, Social Security will run out of money in 2033 and will only be able to make about three-fourths of obligated payments at that time.

He said his proposal to lift the exemption on Social Security taxes for individuals with incomes over $110,600 would force “high-income earners to pay their fair share” into the Social Security fund. Scrapping the cap, Lancman said, would guarantee the program’s solvency for the next 75 years.

“That is what is bankrupting Social Security,” he said before taking swipes at his two major primary challengers, Assemblymember Grace Meng and Councilmember Elizabeth Crowley. “The challenge facing Social Security is immediate and severe, and so far I’m the only candidate in this race that has offered a real plan to save Social Security without reducing benefits, raising the retirement age or privatizing Social Security altogether.”

Meng said her plans were geared towards reaching a long-term solution. She said while the fund would definitely be able to pay benefits until 2033, she agreed Congress needs to take action before that.

“The most important thing right now is to ensure that we do whatever we can to stimulate job and economic growth so that in the long run there will be more people paying into the fund,” Meng said. “My point is not that we’re not taking action — it’s that we have to do whatever we can to increase the funds right now.”

Crowley also fired back at her challenger, saying the cap lift would increase taxes on the middle class and small businesses — not high-income earners. She said her plan is to put people back to work and “keep Republicans from cutting Social Security.”

“Raising taxes on the middle class and on small businesses is exactly what we don’t need to help Social Security. I’m sorry that Mr. Lancman thinks that it is a good idea,” Crowley said.

Lancman received a blow of his own from a local religious leader who sent out a “special clarification” last week, saying he was not endorsing the candidate’s policies or run for Congress after his photo was published without permission or notice in Lancman’s recent legislative mailer.

Reverend Thomas Pettei, a pastor at St. Nicholas of Tolentine R.C. Church in Jamaica, declined to comment, but said the letter speaks for itself.

“What upset me was that this mailing included a picture of me with Assemblyman Lancman, standing in front of our church,” Pettei wrote in the letter. “I simply want to make it clear that in no way should this be interpreted as any kind of endorsement of the Assemblyman’s policies or of his current campaign for Congress.”

The mailer was titled “Keeping our Houses of Worship Safe” and referred to legislation Lancman has proposed. Pettei also pointed to disagreements the Catholic Church and Lancman have on several issues as a reason for his concerns.

Meng recently received the endorsement of the New York League of Conservation Voters and the Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus Leadership PAC, while Crowley gained boosts from the Uniformed EMTs, Paramedics and Fire Inspectors FDNY Local 2507 and Uniformed EMS Officers Union Local 3621.