Tag Archives: computers

Queens Morning Roundup


| brennison@queenscourier.com

TODAY’S FORECAST

Friday: A chance of light rain after noon. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 48. Chance of precipitation is 40%. Friday night: Rain likely, mainly after 9pm. Patchy fog after midnight. Otherwise, cloudy, with a low around 45. Chance of precipitation is 70%.

EVENT of the DAY: Free First Fridays

The Noguchi Museum is pleased to announce the continuation of our First Friday Film Series through the winter months. Visitors can enjoy extended evening hours from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. with free admission, cash bar and special programming.  Click here for more info or to submit an event of your own

Relatives and friends remember subway-push victim at Queens funeral

Relatives and friends are saying a final good-bye to a New York City man who was shoved onto subway tracks as a train rolled into a station. A handful of mourners gathered Thursday for the funeral service for 58-year-old Ki-Suck Han at the Edward D. Jamie Funeral Chapel in Flushing, Queens. Read more: NY Post

George Zimmerman sues NBC, claiming the station edited his 911 phone call to make him sound racist

George Zimmerman sued NBC on Thursday, claiming he was defamed when the network edited his 911 call to police after the shooting of Trayvon Martin to make it sound like he was racist. The former neighborhood watch volunteer filed the lawsuit seeking an undisclosed amount of money in Seminole County, outside Orlando. Read more: Daily News

Accused subway ‘killer’: I blame victim

Accused killer Naeem Davis, with a chilling, dead-eye stare yesterday, was hit with murder charges for tossing a Queens dad into the path of a subway train in Midtown, authorities said. Davis, 30, allegedly confessed to the grisly crime — but coldly blamed his victim, Ki Suk Han, 58. Read more: NY Post

Two armed thugs tie up, rob Queens Realtor of $75,000 in cash

Two bandits burst into a Queens real-estate office Thursday and tied up the owner before swiping $75,000 in cash from a desk drawer, police sources said. The 59-year-old owner of Pistilli Realty on 30th Ave. in Astoria was in his third-floor office when he heard a commotion about 8:30 a.m., the sources said. Read more: Daily News

Point Breeze Fire Department receives outpour of support after heroic rescue during Sandy

The Point Breeze Volunteer Fire House is a hub of relief activity as the community tries to recover after Hurricane Sandy. During the storm, flood waters swallowed streets and fires engulfed homes across Breezy Point. Read more: NY1

MTA boss Joseph Lhota: Sandy subway woes still affecting 500,000 commuters

Subway service is still screwed up for approximately 500,000 riders because of the damage Hurricane Sandy brought down on the system, MTA Chairman Joseph Lhota said Thursday. Some riders are enduring longer and more crowded trips because their stations or line segments are still out of commission while others have longer waits because their regular trains are coming less frequently, Lhota said. Read more: Daily News

Mac Computers to be Made in the USA

One of the Mac line of computers will be manufactured in the USA next year, Apple CEO Tim Cook announced in an interview with Brian Williams on NBC’s Rock Center. Read more: Forbes

Tech tips for college-bound students and their parents


| ara@queenscourier.com

(ARA) – Just 30 years ago, textbooks, paper and pencils were the main supplies college students needed. In today’s digital world, where more teachers are using technology to deliver a better learning experience, college-bound students need to equip themselves with the latest technology to make the most of their college experience and give themselves an academic edge. But how do students and parents know which technologies can get the job done, and how can they best use them to their advantage?

“From viewing lectures online and getting help from a digital tutor to using one of more than 20,000 education-specific apps now available, today’s college students have many options when it comes to technology,” said Brian Kibby, president of McGraw-Hill Higher Education. “Finding the right tools can enhance the learning experience and improve student performance in class – sometimes by a full letter grade or more. These tools have great potential to help students master course material and prepare them for success not only in the classroom, but after graduation.”

Here are some important tech tips for college-bound students and their parents:

1: Get advice and choose the best fit for you.

There is no single piece of technology that’s right for every college student. It’s important to think carefully about your individual needs and purchase only what works best for you. However, it can be helpful to ask current college students which devices they have found to be the most useful. Talk to recent grads about what it takes to be successful in college and what, if anything, they may wish they had done differently in regard to studying and technology. Their answers might be surprising and help steer you in the right direction.

2: Try before you buy.

Before you make a purchase, spend some time with the equipment or program and see how it works. Think of the three things you’ll use it for the most and make your purchase based on those criteria. Before you decide to buy an iPad, try using one to type an email, take notes and view videos to see how comfortable it feels. If not, try another option. In addition to how a device functions, you should assess its portability and battery life since you’ll be using it frequently and in different locations.

3. When it comes to tech, put yourself in your professor’s shoes.

Once you’re on campus, don’t be afraid to ask professors for insights about which technologies will help you the most. Many college professors today use a technology called lecture capture that enables professors to record lectures and make them available for replay after class. Most colleges and millions of college students use digital course hubs that house everything from the course syllabus and e-book to interactive, adaptive quizzes all in one location.

4. Stay connected to your college finances.

If you understand how your college finances work, you’re more likely to take college seriously and get the most out of your education. Speak to your parents about yearly tuition totals and the cost breakdown of each individual class. Graduating college with the best grades and as little debt as possible is key to positioning yourself for success after college.

5. Use social media for academic and professional growth – not just to post party pictures.

College-age students are among the most active users of social media, but many are not aware of the academic and professional benefits. Learn more about how social media platforms like Twitter and LinkedIn can help build your academic network and market yourself as a professional. Your college’s career center should have plenty of info on how you can get started putting your best foot forward with a positive social media footprint.

Money-saving, laptop-buying tips for back-to-school shoppers


| ara@queenscourier.com

(ARA) – Remember when back-to-school shopping meant different needs for different age groups? Elementary school kids needed pencils and notebooks, middle schoolers picked up protractors and compasses, and high school and college students headed back to school with high-powered calculators.

These days, students of virtually every age have one need in common: a laptop.

While many toddlers are using computers to play educational games, once kids reach school, the computer becomes an essential learning tool. If you’ll be looking for a student laptop, the online shopping experts at FatWallet.com offer these tips to help you meet your budget:

* Stick with a laptop, rather than a tablet. While tablets have their uses, when it comes to the efficiency and versatility needed for school work, they can’t replace a laptop. Often, students can use a tablet in tandem with a laptop (or desktop) if your budget allows for both. Many elementary, middle and high schools do not allow tablets. Also, it may be difficult to find tablet versions of textbooks.

* Choose the right size and weight for your student. Your student’s laptop should be light and easy to carry in a backpack, but still large enough for a variety of uses. Models that are 15.6 inches or 17.3 inches provide big enough screens for work and study, while still weighing in the very portable 5- to 7-pound range.

* Any laptop with 250GB hard drive and 4GB DDR Ram is standard on today’s models and more than adequate for school use. Choose a hard drive with 7,200 RPM to increase performance cost effectively. If your student finds out that he or she needs additional memory, adding it is an easy, cost-effective, do-it-yourself upgrade.

* Today’s student will use their laptop for many graphic-intensive applications, like high-definition video streaming and light 2D gaming. Almost all newer laptops, even models with integrated graphics, have plenty of power for both. Unless gaming is the goal, you can save between $100 to $200 by opting out of the dedicated graphics card.

* Be confident of battery power. Most dual and quad-core laptops provide ample battery power for students’ daily activities without the need to lug a power cord along. And since students tend to use iPods or smartphones for email, listening to music and other simple functions, they’ll use less of their laptop’s battery power. Four to six-cell lithium-ion batteries are standard and very efficient.

* Don’t fall for upsells. You can save money on the initial purchase by opting out of bundled anti-virus protection, extended warranties or Word/Office Suite. You can find free, high-quality anti-virus and office productivity software online. And you may get a longer warranty if you buy directly from the brand versus a box store. Most defects will show up before the original warranty expires, so an extended warranty isn’t necessary.

* Be a diligent discount hunter. Your student’s school ID could score you extra savings from many of the major computer makers and software brands, like Apple, HP, Dell, Lenovo, Microsoft, Adobe and Sony. You should also look for timely bargains, cash-back rewards and exclusive online coupons from tech deal sites like FatWallet.com. The website works with most major sellers like HP, Dell, Best Buy and Newegg to help increase back-to-school savings. Ebates is another easy-to-use website that offers cash back discounts on a wide variety of back-to-school supplies.

* Buy with a credit card. Using a credit card for your laptop purchase offers you all the consumer protections associated with credit card use, plus some card companies, like Visa or American Express, will automatically extend your warranty an extra year.

A laptop is a back-to-school essential, but with a little planning and research you can purchase one for your student with as much confidence as you buy pens, pencils and notebooks, and save money by following these smart tips.