Tag Archives: Community Board 9

Ozone Park plaza getting makeover


| slicata@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/ Photos by Salvatore Licata

A pedestrian plaza in Ozone Park that has become a detriment to local business is getting a makeover, according to the community group charged with maintaining it.

Shortly after The Courier published an article on the forlorn plaza at 101st Avenue and Drew Street, the Bangladesh American Community Development and Youth Services (BACDYS) organization placed a sign in the plaza announcing a re-make of the plaza.

There have already been changes made. BACDYS has scheduled an event for the plaza on Aug. 21 and also added umbrellas and chairs to better accommodate locals.

The sign hung up in the plaza reads, “A new plaza is proposed here,” and there is a meeting planned by Community Board 9 to discuss further solutions.

“When Community Board 9 voted in favor of the pedestrian plaza, we did so with the understanding that we would monitor the plaza’s local impacts and keep an eye on whether it remained an asset to the community,” CB 9 chairman Ralph Gonzalez said. “With this meeting, we hope to give all sides of this discussion a seat at the table, and we are aiming to arrive at the best resolution possible.”

Local business owners complained about the plaza because of the number of parking spaces it took up on 101st Avenue and Drew Street.

The meeting will be held on Aug. 21 at Queens Borough Hall at 4:30 p.m. Expected to attend are representatives from Community Board 9; the Department of Transportation’s Queens Borough Commissioner, Dalila Hall; representatives from the BACDYS organization and merchants from the area who have complained about the plaza.

 

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CB 9 member Sam Esposito arrested for defrauding Social Security Disability Insurance: sources


| mhayes@queenscourier.com

File photo

Controversial Community Board (CB) 9 member Sam Esposito was arrested Tuesday in conjunction with an insurance fraud bust, said authorities and sources close to the board.

Thirty-two people were arrested for their participation in a “massive fraud” against the federal Social Security Disability Insurance Benefits (SSDI) program, Esposito included, according to Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance.

The longtime board member, a former cop, is accused of applying for and receiving SSDI benefits after claiming to suffer from a psychiatric condition that prevented him from working, according to the district attorney.

Vance said a handful of those arrested attributed their psychiatric problems to association with the September 11 attacks. A source said Esposito’s NYPD career ended because of a September 11-related trauma.

He was additionally collecting pension as an NYPD retiree. Although Esposito may have had limited physical disabilities that entitled him to state disability pension, this did not call for SSDI benefits, Vance said.

These benefits offer about $30,000 to $50,000 for each recipient.

Esposito is charged with grand larceny, a felony, and criminal facilitation, a misdemeanor. His father, Joseph Esposito, was also arrested as a “principal defendant,” according to Vance.

The CB 9 member was under fire after fellow board members accused him of being anti-Semitic in November. A vote was held to remove him from the board, but never came to fruition.

Esposito did not return request for comment.

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CB 9 members question whether BP will amend infighting issues


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

MAGGIE HAYES AND TERENCE M. CULLEN

Community Board (CB) 9 has grown infamous for its internal disagreements, leaving some members to wonder about oversight and to question whether they should seek help.

The borough president’s office oversees Queens’ 14 community boards. The question now is whether newly-elected Borough President Melinda Katz and her staff will amend the issues.

District Manager Mary Ann Carey said the borough president has recently called several board members in for interviews, including herself last week, regarding “everything,” but declined to specify what was discussed.

From September to November of last year, about 15 to 20 board members were “strongly discussing” having the borough president’s office intervene, but instead decided to “let it be” and “wait it out,” said an anonymous board source, who asked not to be named in fear of retribution.

“There has certainly been a lot of dissent regarding leadership,” the source said.

Now, the source “certainly hopes” Katz will intervene.

Another ranking board member, who asked not to be named, said the borough president’s office was aware of the problems with the board from local news coverage. Discussing matters of personnel issues with the press, however, would be inappropriate, the source said.

Katz’s office declined to comment. Katz oversaw community boards for three years when working for former Borough President Clare Shulman.

Last August, Carey was placed on six months’ probation after a battle with the board’s executive committee, which nearly ousted her in June of the position she has held for 30 years.

Board member Sam Esposito defended Carey and said that Chairperson Jim Coccovillo “restlessly continued on his quest to harass and intimidate the staff.”

In November, Esposito dodged his own removal from the board after allegations he made anti-Semitic remarks. Coccovillo attempted to redo the vote that kept Esposito, but it never came to fruition.

“Plenty of people were ready to boot him as chair if he tried to kick Sam off the board again,” said another member, who spoke on the condition of anonymity.

Coccovillo was absent from the January meeting, and Carey revealed the chair had given her a performance report, in which she failed every category.

She then alleged that she and her staff work under stressful conditions because Coccovillo was always watching over their shoulder, and that he subjected them to “harassment.”

Coccovillo could not be reached for comment.

In March, CB 9 will have a vote for new leadership. Multiple sources said there is no chance Coccovillo will be reelected.

“I think we need a change in both the leadership and the office staff,” one source said.

 

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City Council passes Ozone Park rezoning


| mhayes@queenscourier.com

Photo Courtesy of the office of Councilmember Eric Ulrich

The City Council passed a change in Ozone Park’s zoning map Tuesday to reflect the neighborhood’s building patterns.

Now, the zoning mandates will reinforce the area’s one- and-two-family residential homes and direct new residential and mixed-use developments to more commercial locations.

“The new zoning enacted into law today will protect Ozone Park from overdevelopment and help create a more livable neighborhood,” said Councilmember Eric Ulrich, who was born and raised in Ozone Park.

“It will also spur new modest development, especially in the commercial districts, thereby creating jobs and increasing property values,” he continued.

The rezoning is bounded by Rockaway Boulevard, Atlantic Avenue and 101st Avenue to the north; the Van Wyck Expressway and Lefferts Boulevard to the east; the Belt Parkway to the south; and the Brooklyn borough line to the west.

This marks the second largest rezoning in Queens, changing the map for roughly 530 blocks in Ozone Park. The vote was prompted by concerns from Community Boards 9 and 10 as well as local civic organizations and elected officials.

“Out of character structures and overdevelopment has become far too common in our communities,” said Councilmember Ruben Wills. “That is why it was important that we undertook these aggressive measures to protect the integrity of our neighborhoods.”

 

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CB 9 chair demands do-over after vote to keep board member


| mhayes@queenscourier.com

The problems keep coming for Community Board 9.

James Coccovillo, the board’s chair, wants a do-over after a recent vote to keep on board member Sam Esposito.

At the November meeting, Esposito called for a public vote in order to avoid the board going into executive session to call for his removal. Coccovillo obliged, and Esposito was saved with a 34-10 vote.

Esposito was the subject of rumors within the group after he clashed with three other members. He was accused of being anti-Semitic, but said he “isn’t anti-anything.”

Late on November 18, Coccovillo distributed a press release, unbeknownst to the majority of the board, stating the last meeting did not adhere to CB 9’s bylaws and the issues raised then will therefore have to be dealt with again in December.

“I would not have known about it had I not seen it on Twitter,” said one board member.

The chair met with members of the borough president’s office, who confirmed Coccovillo “wrongfully allowed CB 9 bylaws to be bypassed, a fact that needs to be rectified to sustain the confidence and trust of the board as well as the public.”

Esposito maintains his innocence and said the problem lies within his support for District Manager Mary Anne Carey, who Coccovillo attempted to remove from the board in June.

“[Coccovillo] did so without the knowledge of any other members of the board,” Esposito said. “He restlessly continued on his quest to harass and intimidate the staff from the time he became chair until now. What we are doing is protecting these girls who have worked tirelessly through the years.”

Consideration for the removal of Esposito from CB 9 will be addressed again at the December 10 meeting.

 

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Community Board 9 votes to keep member after accusations of anti-Semitic remarks


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Maggie Hayes

LIAM LA GUERRE AND MAGGIE HAYES

Controversial Community Board 9 member Sam Esposito is here to stay, which sent several other members walking out the door.

A vote to remove Esposito from the board was shot down at the November meeting, 34 to 10.

Rumors of infighting circled the board for months, beginning in June with the potential removal of District Manager Mary Ann Carey.

“I would like the board not to be as divided as it is, and concentrate on the issues,” Carey told The Courier prior to the vote.

But at the November 12 meeting, the main point of issue was Esposito.

Multiple board members alleged Esposito made anti-Semitic remarks following a lunch meeting, in which said members felt their food was not “glatt kosher,” a higher standard than average.

Esposito shot back at Wallace Bock, Jan Fenster and Evelyn Baron. Bock responded, and wrote a letter to have Esposito, who has been on the board for decades, removed.

However, Esposito claims he was being targeted for his longtime support of Carey.

“I am in no way prejudiced against anybody,” he said. “All they are trying to do is get back at me for sticking up for Mary Ann Carey. This has nothing to do with the board.”

At November’s meeting, as the vote for removal approached, Esposito and Chair James Coccovillo screamed back and forth across the room.

“This is personal, Jim. This is about Mary Ann,” Esposito said, standing from his seat.

Coccovillo said he was adhering to “a demand” for Esposito’s termination.

“Do you want to sit down? There’s a little sign of aggression when you stand up,” he said. “There’s no reason for yelling out.”

After the votes were counted and Esposito was off the chopping block, he turned to his neighbors and said, “of course we won.”

Wallace Bock then stood up and addressed Coccovillo.

“I cannot in good conscious consider to sit on a board that condones the behavior of Sam Esposito. I resign,” he said.

Fenster and Baron followed him out the door, but offered no comment on their own resignation.

 

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Cops pull back some Forest Park patrols


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

The NYPD is pulling back some of its police presence in Forest Park months after beefing up patrols following an August rape cops connected to five other sexual assaults in the park between March 2011 and this summer.

Police decided to remove eight cop cars that were patrolling the area after there were no additional sex crimes reported in the six weeks following the rape, the 102nd Precinct’s commanding officer, Henry Sautner, said at the most recent Community Board 9 (CB9) meeting. He said the resources for the coverage could not be maintained on an ongoing basis.

Sautner said there will still be two officers assigned to patrol the park. They are also utilizing auxiliary officers through their 56-member auxiliary program, with two to three operations per week in Forest Park.

“They’re the police officers and I believe they know best what they are doing,” said Mary Ann Carey, CB9 District Manager.

But Carey said she would like to see more Park Enforcement Patrol (PEP) officers, for which the community has been lobbying.

A Parks Department spokesperson said this fall new PEP substations in Forest Park and in Rockaway will be opening “allowing [them] to more easily patrol the parks of western and southern Queens, respectively.” The substations, said the spokesperson, were made possible due to Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s Fiscal Year 2014 budget, which also doubled the amount of city-funded PEP officers that are available for patrols.

 

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Ozone Park rezoning plans on the table


| mhayes@queenscourier.com

The map in Ozone Park could soon be changing to allow the community to welcome new development and reinforce its “residential character.”

The Department of City Planning (DCP) proposed a rezoning of the neighborhood in response to the community’s concerns that the existing zoning doesn’t “closely reflect established building patters,” according to the DCP.

Community Boards 9 and 10, local civic organizations and elected officials were among those who voiced their concerns.

“Now more than ever, Ozone Park demands a smarter and more flexible blueprint that protects the character of the residential parts of the neighborhood and strengthens the commercial districts to stimulate economic development,” said Councilmember Eric Ulrich.

The proposed rezoning area is bounded by Rockaway Boulevard, Atlantic Avenue and 101st Avenue to the north; the Van Wyck Expressway and Lefferts Boulevard to the east; the Belt Parkway to the south; and the Brooklyn borough line to the west.

Currently, the area consists of three residential zones which have been left unchanged since 1961. This existing zoning has allowed the development of three-to-four story, multi-family attached houses and apartment buildings.

DCP said this layout does not reflect the “scale and character” of the desired one-and-two family homes, both attached and separate, that are typically found within Ozone Park. Existing zoning additionally doesn’t distinguish the scale of buildings along most of the area’s commercial corridors and prohibits development of larger buildings.

The proposed rezoning is intended to “reinforce neighborhood character and established building patterns,” direct new housing opportunities, allow for a mix of uses to major corridors and prevent commercial encroachment into residential areas.

“As someone who was born and raised in Ozone Park, it will give me great pleasure to participate in the public review process and to vote on its final approval when it reaches the City Council,” Ulrich said.

Community Boards 9 and 10 are now reviewing the proposal, which will also be reviewed by the borough president and the borough board. It will then go to the City Planning Commission and the City Council.

 

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Community Board 9 district manager says she’s willing to work with probation committee


| tcullen@queenscourier.com

Mary Anne Carey says she is not holding any grudges.

The longtime district manager of Community Board 9 has been placed on six months’ probation after a battle with the board’s executive committee, which came to the brink of ousting her.

There was speculation about the board voting to remove Carey at its June 11 meeting, during which members went into executive session. This forced the public, the media and Carey to wait outside as the board had a nearly hour-and-a-half discussion on removing the tenured manager.

In the end no vote was taken, a source close to the board said. Members instead decided to put Carey on probation until December.

A committee will be set up to monitor Carey’s management of the board office.
Carey said she is planning to stay put until she believes she can no longer serve the board.

“At this point, I’m certainly going to work with the committee and do whatever they want us to do,” she said. “When I’m ready to retire, they will be the first to know.”

She said some members of the board approached Carey earlier this year and suggested the 30-year manager retire amid allegations of mismanagement in the board’s office.

The complaints included a perceived lack of communication and dated technology in the office.
Carey, addressing this criticism, said her office got little funding and was not able to keep up with what seems like constant updates.

“Any kind of training, nobody’s told us we need any kind of training,” she said. “We can’t spend $10,000 or $15,000 to get somebody to program the computers. Nothing can be done overnight.”

Alex Blenkinsopp, one of the members who planned to vote Carey out, said his colleagues on the board changed his mind. He added he believes changes will be made for the better of the board.

“We’ve come 30 years with her,” he said. “We can afford to give her another six months. I’m confident that everyone will be on the same page about what needs to be done and that all CB9 members will be aware of whether those goals have been met.”

 

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New train engines to improve Queens air quality


| mhayes@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Assemblymember Andrew Hevesi's Office

Antiquated, high emission train engines have been a great concern for residents in the industrial areas of southwest Queens. But now, an upgrade is on the way.

Freight trains passing through areas of Community Board 5 and 9 have been running past residential homes for years, causing the track’s neighbors to question any potential health risks.

“This is a quality of life issue,” said Mary Parisen, chair of Civics United for Railroad Environmental Solutions (CURES).

CURES has worked feverishly to ensure upgraded locomotive engines for the area, and through work with Assemblymember Andrew Hevesi and a coalition of elected officials, managed to secure $3 million in this year’s legislative budget to upgrade engines.

“This is the first win in what will be an ongoing fight to protect the health of countless families in Queens,” Hevesi said.

“With New York State’s recognition that outdated trains can be severely damaging to communities they pass through, we have taken the first step toward fixing this problem.”

The funds will kick off a pilot project that will upgrade the first of a number of antiquated, high- emission trains.

The trains, owned and leased by the LIRR, are currently equipped with “archaic” 1970s engines, and operate throughout the city and Long Island, carrying waste and cargo near residents’ backyards, schools, parks and beaches.

However, after the upgrade, there is expected to be an annual reduction in nitrogen oxide, a known byproduct of diesel engines, by up to 76 percent, or 120 tons of emission over 10 years, according to Hevesi’s office.

After years of work advocating for modernized engines, Parisen said that she and the other members of CURES are “ecstatic” simply because they no longer need to convince agencies and the government that the upgrade needed to be done.

“They all acknowledged that this needs to happen, now it’s just a matter of how we’re going to do it,” she said.

The allocated $3 million is going to the LIRR and the MTA, Parisen said, and they are going to upgrade however many trains they can with the amount.

“The locomotives now are doing the most damage to the most densely-populated areas,” she said. “We need to make sure the neighborhood gets the best locomotive possible.”

The coalition plans to continue petitioning the state until all necessary fleet upgrades have been completed, said Hevesi’s office.

 

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Toxic chemicals worry Ozone Park residents


| tcullen@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Terence M. Cullen

The cleanup of polluted soil in Ozone Park has some residents worried toxic chemicals have spread throughout the neighborhood.

End Zone Industries will begin a long-awaited project to remove just a few inches of tainted soil from under eight storage bays under the abandoned Rockaway Beach LIRR line. The bays are between 101st and 103rd Avenues, from north to south, and 99th to 100th Streets, east to west.

Company representatives briefed Community Board 9 about the project at its April 9 meeting – with some board members upset about the project.

David Austin, project manager for AECOM, a consulting firm for End Zone, said major construction will take about three to four months. The “dirty dirt,” Austin said, would be securely removed from the garage bays in bags and transferred to a landfill on sealed trucks. There will also be air monitors running about 12 hours a day, should any contaminants make it into the air.

But board member Etienne David Adorno said he was worried that the monitors would only alert officials, not do anything to prevent or clean up.

“So if there’s a contaminant released into the air, then all it tells us is ‘Hey, a contaminant was just released into the air,’” he said. “So it doesn’t really do us any good once it’s in the air.”

A system of pipes would also be installed to take spoiled air out of the soil, through a filtration system and back into the ground, Austin said.

But concerns over a spread chemical, Trichloroethylene (TCE), business disruption and other concerns had board members skeptical about the project. TCE is an organic chemical that’s been used in cleaning solvents, paint thinner and pepper spray, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Dr. Vincent Evangelista, whose podiatry office is nearby the cleanup, expressed concern over the TCE-tainted brown water about 30 feet under the surface. Evangelista asked Austin and End Zone representatives if the contaminated soil, deemed by End Zone to be non-hazardous, immediately stopped outside of the allotted bays.

Austin acknowledged the soil could have spread to other parts of the neighborhood, but most of it has not been tested.
“There’s always unknowns when you dig underground and into dirt,” he said.

Testers only examined the soil under the eight bays, as required by the state’s Department of Environment Conservation (DEC).

It’s a matter the board would have to take up with the DEC to get the rest of the neighborhood tested, Austin said.

 

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Queens’ Morning Roundup


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

TODAY’S FORECAST 

Monday: Partly cloudy. High of 68. Winds from the North at 5 to 10 mph shifting to the SSW in the afternoon. Monday night: Overcast with a chance of rain. Low of 54. Winds from the South at 5 to 10 mph. Chance of rain 30%.

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At 1:30 p.m. at the Central Queens Y in Forest Hills, writer, artist and civil rights activist Marione Ingram will discuss her memoir on her experiences during the Holocaust. Following World War II, Ingram emigrated to the U.S. and set up a Freedom School in Mississippi during the 1960s. $6 suggested donation. Click here for more info or to submit an event of your own

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Votes split on USTA expansion


| tcullen@queenscourier.com

Rendering courtesy of USTA

The votes are in on the much-debated expansions to the Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, and the results are mixed.

Half of the six voting Community Boards are in favor of the US Tennis Association (USTA) moving 0.68 acres out of its current property — so long as the organization meets certain conditions set by each board.

Board 6 voted 21-6 and Board 8 26-8 in favor on Wednesday, March 13; Communty Board 3 voted 33-1 against the next night. The six advisory decisions will now go to Borough President Helen Marshall, who has 60 days to decide on the expansions. Marshall’s decision then goes to the City Council and the City Planning Commission.

Marshall will hold a forum on the plan April 4 at Borough Hall. The Borough Board, led by Marshall, will vote on the plan April 8.

Two boards voted against the proposal last week, one of which could switch to yes if USTA meets nine regulations — similar to those set by other boards — including setting up a conservancy for the park. Community Board 7 voted yes, but with eight conditions, on March 11.

Each board has recommended USTA discount court prices for seniors and children, and invest in the park’s crumbling facilities.

“Community Board review was the first step in a multi-layered governmental review process that also includes the borough president, City Planning, City Council and State Legislature,” said Tennis Center Chief Operating Officer Danny Zausner. “We look forward to continuing our dialogue as we move through the different phases.”

Parkland advocates against the plan, however, say they’re going to continue informing residents of the downside of the plans. “I think the community boards’ vote will have no impact whatsoever on the BP’s vote or the City Council members,” said NYC Park Advocates president Geoffrey Croft. “They seem perfectly willing to give away additional parkland to this private business for concessions.”

 

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Local boards mixed on National Tennis Center expansion


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Photos courtesy of USTA

BY TERENCE M. CULLEN AND MELISSA CHAN

Six community boards are lobbing back and forth on approving the proposed expansion of the Billie Jean King National Tennis Center.

The boards surrounding the park are required to vote on the .68 acres lost in the U.S. Tennis Association’s (USTA) plan to expand in the park. Their recommendations, which are solely advisory, then go to the Borough President, the City Council and the Department of City Planning.

So far, two community boards have voted against the expansion, and one has opted in favor of it.

Community Board 9 voted 22-20 against the plan, with one abstention, after a lengthy debate at its March 13 meeting. Board member Alex Blenkinsopp said he thought many voted against it to send a message that parkland should not be given up for expansion.

“I believe the majority of Community Board 9 voted the way we did because we’re concerned about the future of Flushing Meadows-Corona Park,” he said. “This would have set a worrying precedent. That land, once surrendered, will never come back. And I don’t think it’s unreasonable to want the National Tennis Center to live within its current footprint.”

Community Board 4 also voted down the expansion. However, it said it would approve it if the USTA meets nine requests, according to District Manager Christian Cassagnol. Some of the resolutions call for better park security, a $15 million trust fund exclusively for the park, and a $500,000 per year maintenance fund that would be overseen by members of different community boards.

Community Board 7 voted 30-6 in favor of the expansion, but members also had nine conditions. The board asked the USTA to establish a $15 million capital endowment fund and an annual $300,000 expense fund for sole Flushing Meadows-Corona Park maintenance.

All damaged trees, they said, must also be replaced within the park, and there must be substantial discount programs for seniors and children living nearby.

Community Board 7 also insisted National Anthem tryouts should be held in Queens. The USTA must also work with the Department of Parks to clean and maintain the property and mitigate traffic concerns.

“The reason why we voted [yes with conditions] is because we found out that even if they didn’t want to take our conditions, they came back to the table to talk to us,” said Community Board 7 Chair Eugene Kelty. “They had a meeting in our office. They asked us if they could come in and explain what was happening after the fact. They didn’t have to, but they did.”

Community Boards 3, 6 and 8 were scheduled to vote after The Courier went to press.

 

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Tennis officials, opponents talk on proposed expansion to National Tennis Center


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Terence M. Cullen

BY MELISSA CHAN & TERENCE M. CULLEN

While tennis reps continue lobbying for expansion in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, residents from around the borough came out in full force against the proposal Monday, February 11 at Community Board 7’s monthly meeting.

“Our parks were developed for the use of the public. It’s where the citizens can gather with their families and their neighbors to enjoy the beauty of nature,” said John Kelly, a Flushing resident who lives by Kissena Park. “These people […] look at the green spaces and have desires to make a buck for themselves at our expense.”

Unites States Tennis Association (USTA) officials have proposed building a new stadium at the Billie Jean King National Tennis Center. The project includes moving a connector road from the park within the center’s leased land and several courts south in order to ease foot traffic. It would also take away .68 acres more parkland than what is in USTA’s updated 1993 lease.

Several local residents said the land grab would be a steal of taxpayer property and money. “There is no reason to be intimidated by the USTA,” said resident Ben Haber. “There is no justification for the USTA’s request other than they want to make more money.”

Haber said sports arenas do little to boost the city’s economy. The taking, he said, would be as “worthless as a dead tennis ball.”

The development would also add to the air and noise population that plagues the borough, residents said.

“All this overbuilding is an unnecessary and unacceptable takeaway from the Flushing community,” said Elizabeth Lee of Flushing. “We need parks, not more stadiums, not more malls.”

But USTA officials and union workers spoke to the benefits of the project at a recent Community Board 9 meeting. They said thousands of union construction jobs would be created and an additional 10,000 tennis fans a day would visit when the U.S. Open is in session.

Jack Leone, a union electrical worker, said he has done work regularly at the Tennis Center for the past eight years. “We live in a tough economy,” Leone said. “So I am grateful for the regular work I get at the [National Tennis Center], which has a long history of hiring local union workers.”

Ted Newkirk, a project manager for union plumbers and steamfitters, said further expansions and maintenance thereafter would continue to provide jobs. “The National Tennis Center has a long history of hiring local union workers,” he said.

 

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