Tag Archives: Community Board 7

Tennis officials, opponents talk on proposed expansion to National Tennis Center


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Terence M. Cullen

BY MELISSA CHAN & TERENCE M. CULLEN

While tennis reps continue lobbying for expansion in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, residents from around the borough came out in full force against the proposal Monday, February 11 at Community Board 7’s monthly meeting.

“Our parks were developed for the use of the public. It’s where the citizens can gather with their families and their neighbors to enjoy the beauty of nature,” said John Kelly, a Flushing resident who lives by Kissena Park. “These people […] look at the green spaces and have desires to make a buck for themselves at our expense.”

Unites States Tennis Association (USTA) officials have proposed building a new stadium at the Billie Jean King National Tennis Center. The project includes moving a connector road from the park within the center’s leased land and several courts south in order to ease foot traffic. It would also take away .68 acres more parkland than what is in USTA’s updated 1993 lease.

Several local residents said the land grab would be a steal of taxpayer property and money. “There is no reason to be intimidated by the USTA,” said resident Ben Haber. “There is no justification for the USTA’s request other than they want to make more money.”

Haber said sports arenas do little to boost the city’s economy. The taking, he said, would be as “worthless as a dead tennis ball.”

The development would also add to the air and noise population that plagues the borough, residents said.

“All this overbuilding is an unnecessary and unacceptable takeaway from the Flushing community,” said Elizabeth Lee of Flushing. “We need parks, not more stadiums, not more malls.”

But USTA officials and union workers spoke to the benefits of the project at a recent Community Board 9 meeting. They said thousands of union construction jobs would be created and an additional 10,000 tennis fans a day would visit when the U.S. Open is in session.

Jack Leone, a union electrical worker, said he has done work regularly at the Tennis Center for the past eight years. “We live in a tough economy,” Leone said. “So I am grateful for the regular work I get at the [National Tennis Center], which has a long history of hiring local union workers.”

Ted Newkirk, a project manager for union plumbers and steamfitters, said further expansions and maintenance thereafter would continue to provide jobs. “The National Tennis Center has a long history of hiring local union workers,” he said.

 

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Flushing fighting colossal church


| mchan@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Melissa Chan

Dozens of local leaders and incensed neighbors are striking down one Flushing church’s plan of building up to the heavens.

Senator Tony Avella led a protest on March 8, rallying against the building of a proposed “enormous and out-of-scale” religious facility at 145-15 33rd Avenue.

“You’d have a giant in the land of ordinary people,” said Tyler Cassell, president of the North Flushing Civic Association and member of Community Board 7.

Officials said there is currently an application before the Board of Standards and Appeals (BSA) that could potentially allow developer — The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints — to combine three vacant lots, building a site twice as large as is allowed by law. The proposed facility would be 23,097 square feet when only about 12,200 is allowed, officials said.

“This application is absurd and should not even be considered by the BSA,” Avella said.

The proposal was overwhelmingly opposed by Community Board 7, as well as Borough President Helen Marshall.

Still, if the application variance is granted by the BSA, a 50-foot tall chapel with a 94-foot steeple would be built in the low-density neighborhood predominantly comprised of single-family homes. Officials said the church would be 15 times the size of a single house on the street.

“The church is trying to build a monstrous facility in an area where it will be completely out of context with the rest of the neighborhood,” said Avella, adding that the church could appropriately build a facility of the proposed magnitude in Downtown Flushing — where zoning laws would not restrict it — or expand at its current location on Sanford Avenue.

“For a church to be this inconsiderate is beyond me. They’re not being a good neighbor by building here,” said Avella, who was chair of the zoning subcommittee when he said he fought to rezone the area to eliminate over-building.

The BSA has not yet scheduled a public hearing on the issue, although the proposal is slated to go before the board in April.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints did not return calls for comment.

“If this building receives its variances and is allowed to proceed, it will make a mockery of the community facility reforms that took place city wide in 2004 and will set a terrible precedent,” said lifelong area resident Paul Graziano, who also co-designed the North Flushing Rezoning. “Should this be passed by the BSA, suburban-like neighborhoods can expect outrageously large and out-of-context religious community facilities in the near future.”

CB7 rejects Mormon Church bid


| smosco@queenscourier.com

It’ll take a prayer.

The Mormon Church will have to re-examine its options after Community Board 7 (CB 7) unanimously rejected a request for zoning variances for a proposed church on 33rd Avenue in Flushing.

With 11 congregations in Queens, and one currently in Flushing, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints proposed building a new structure that would include a worship area and community room on the ground floor, plus classrooms and office space on an upper level.

The Church needs three variances to build a 23,000-square-foot building on the land it owns at 145-15 33rd Avenue. A 12,000-square-foot structure is allowed there under current zoning. The plan also calls for a 94-foot steeple, which would end up being one of the tallest structures in Queens.

Officials at CB 7 said that this structure would not fit the character of the neighborhood and that the variances requested by the church go against zoning laws in Flushing.

Bishop John Wu, who leads the church’s worshippers on Sanford Avenue, said his congregation has outgrown its current location and expansion is sorely needed. However, CB 7 contends that the rejection is all about size — and he believes the church wants something that is too big for the mostly residential area.

“We looked at this application with a blind eye, and we determined that it did not meet the zoning laws,” said Tyler Cassell, a member of the zoning committee and the land use committee at CB 7. “Our fear is that if these variances are granted, it would be a precedent setting case and will open the door to other large community facilities to further invade our neighborhoods protected under the current zoning.”

Residents voiced their opposition to Borough President Helen Marshall during a public hearing Thursday, February 2. Marshall will make a recommendation within 30 days to the city Board of Standards and Appeals, which has the final say.

Whitestone waterfront for sale, development


| aaltman@queenscourier.com

Photos Courtesy of Massey Knakal Realty Services

House hunters searching for outer-borough bliss may soon find sanctuary on a scenic Whitestone cove, as 13 acres of waterfront property — the single largest building site in the borough — is now for sale.

The site, located at 151-45 6th Road, is currently overseen by real estate agent Stephen Preuss of Massey Knakal Realty Services. He is confident that sale price maximization will be possible over the next few months. Preuss alleges the property, which became available via short sale, has already been approved for the construction of 52 single-family homes by the City Planning Commission as well as the “proper community channels,” including Community Board 7.

“We shouldn’t have any problems picking up these plans and moving forward,” said Preuss.

According to Preuss, the land will most likely be purchased by a single developer rather than broken up into smaller plots, adding that the buyer may choose to build in phases as opposed to assembling the entire area at once.

Five of the 13 acres are submerged underwater, which, according to Preuss, the builder would most likely convert into a marina or boat slips.
“It’s one of the most desirable areas in the borough,” he said.

The average waterfront home in Whitestone sells for $2 million, according to Preuss.

State Senator Tony Avella supports the development so long as it adheres to the current plan of 52 single-family homes. Straying from this, Avella threatens, will meet “fierce opposition from the community and me.” As the land is currently an industrial site, Avella believes the addition of a well-thought-out housing complex will be an asset to the community, rather than a detriment.

“A lot of work was put into this plan which will match the character of the neighborhood and set a precedent for future development,” said Avella.

College Point spa issue is a steamer


| aaltman@queenscourier.com

Local officials are not warming up to the idea of a luxury spa in College Point.

Community Board 7 voted overwhelmingly against the project, with 25 members against and only five in favor. Borough President Helen Marshall will now review the plan before it goes to the New York City Board of Standards and Appeals and a final decision is made.

“They usually take three weeks to digest the testimony and make a decision,” said spokesperson Dan Andrews.

According to Andrews, the building request was submitted by architect and engineer H. Irving Sigman of S&I Property Management, who presented the plans at a Land Use Hearing at the borough president’s office on Thursday, November 17.

The spa would be installed in a previously existing structure, and according to Andrews, would generate two-and-a-half times more tax revenue than is currently generated in College Point. The facility, to be located at 31st Avenue and the Whitestone Expressway, would potentially have amenities such as a rooftop pool, a yoga studio, a beauty salon and food store.

Andrews alleged that the main reason many board members opposed the spa was because of the rooftop pool, which would be open from 6 a.m. to midnight.

“We are currently making some revisions to our plans,” said Sigman. “There are some changes that are required in the design, and then we’ll submit those to a public hearing.”

Sigman alleged that there was concern among board members about the soil and the foundation surrounding the potential building site. According to Sigman, they felt that the ground was too weak to support such an endeavor. Sigman also alleged that the board was concerned about the credentials of the possible builder, Kwang Park, who is new to construction but has previous business experience. The board asked about Park’s background and a resume was presented at the meeting.

Sigman believes that the spa would be good for the area, boosting business and providing for the community.

“It’s available to everyone and it’s in good proximity to residential areas. We think it will attract a lot of customers,” said Sigman.

Within the next few weeks, the borough president and the community board will review the information and the fate of the luxury spa will be determined.