Tag Archives: Community Board 11

Community Board 11 to lose longtime leader, elect new chair


| mchan@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/File photo

Community Board 11 will lose a longtime leader and elect a new chair next month.

The Queens board will bid farewell to Jerry Iannece, who is term-limited due to the board’s bylaws. An election to replace him will take place March 3.

“It was an awesome ride,” said Iannece, whose term ends March 31. “It was exciting, exhilarating. It’s been a labor of love in many ways.”

Iannece was first appointed as board chair in 2002, stepping down in 2007 due to term limits. He returned to take back the board’s helm in 2009.

Under his leadership, Community Board 11 was at the forefront of a $125 million ravine improvement project at Oakland Lake. The massive upgrade, which was more than 10 years in the making, fixed a flooding problem in Bayside Hills.

“It saved Oakland Lake, and it saved the ecosystem,” Iannece said. “It’s sort of a textbook case of how a civic can identify a problem, employ their resources and get a problem solved.”

But after a roller coaster, decade-long tenure — and multiple failed bids for political office — the civic leader plans to step down for good.

“It’s an exhausting, full-time job without pay. I think my time as chair of Community Board 11 has come to an end,” said Iannece, who most recently ran for City Council in 2009 and suffered a devastating defeat in his bid for state Assembly in 2012.

“Running for office for a few years took a lot out of me,” the attorney said. “It just wasn’t meant to be, but it’s OK.”

Board members will nominate and then vote in a new chair at the end of the March 3 meeting, which starts at 7:30 p.m. at 46-35 Oceania St. in Bayside.

The board covers Auburndale, Bayside, Douglaston, Little Neck, Hollis Hills and Oakland Gardens.

“I think it’s always good to have fresh blood, to have someone with new ideas,” Iannece said. “We’ll find somebody that’s more than capable of filling my shoes and doing a great job.”

 

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111th Precinct bids adieu to beloved community affairs officer


| mchan@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Melissa Chan

For 10 years, Community Affairs Officer Gary Poggiali has watched 120 officers accept their “Cops of the Month” awards from the back of the room.

Now he has plenty of plaques to call his own.

Community leaders gave a final salute to the retiring, beloved cop with an armful of plaques and an earful of praises at a farewell party on December 3.

“Gary is one of the good guys,” said Community Board 11 Chair Jerry Iannece. “He deals with us and all the issues in the community, and he does it with humor. He does it with pride, and he does it really well.”

Poggiali has served close to 20 years with the NYPD. After one year in the police academy, he spent five years with the 73rd Precinct in Brooklyn, three working patrol for the 111th Precinct and then a decade in community affairs.

“I know this community better than the community I grew up in,” Poggiali said. “I’ve spent a lot of time here.

It’s just another page. My mother used to say, ‘When one door closes, another one opens.’”

The precinct’s Community Council and a number of elected officials thanked him for his service, while poking jabs at him for “always eating.”

“No matter what, Gary was always there for us, always friendly, always went the extra mile to help our office out,” said Assemblymember Ed Braunstein.

Community Council President Jack Fried credited the affable Poggiali for the success of the precinct’s annual National Night Out Against Crime.

“If it [weren’t] for Gary, they wouldn’t be half as big as they were,” Fried said. “Gary really put everything into it.”
Poggiali, 50, plans to move and work security jobs down south in March. The new father welcomed his son Ryan to the world about two months ago.

His last day with the NYPD is in mid-February.

“This was a big piece of my life,” Poggiali said.

“I’ll look back and tell my kids stories of how I ran the neighborhood, how I was the commanding officer,” he joked.

 

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Bayside activist may retire from community board


| mchan@queenscourier.com

Bayside activist Frank Skala may retire from Community Board 11 this year due to old age, the board said.

“He’s saying he just can’t continue. He’s been having to leave early. He’s slowed down a lot. I can understand why he’s doing this,” said Susan Seinfeld, the board’s district manager.

The ever-opinionated Skala, 76, has been on the board for at least a decade. Though he did not participate this year, he is well-known for dressing up as Santa Claus during Bayside’s annual tree lighting.

“He’s our character. He was the community’s character,” Seinfeld said. “You just expected him to say something out of the ordinary every month. That’s what we’ll miss at the meetings — the opinions.”

 

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Community Board 11 OKs Douglaston car dealership expansion


| mchan@queenscourier.com

Community Board 11 granted the East Hills Chevrolet in Douglaston permission to build a parking deck and expand its showcase to display six more new cars.

The car dealership at 240-02 Northern Boulevard, originally constructed in 1954, needed to grow in order to be “competitive in the market” and “meet new standards of Chevrolet,” according to the building’s architect, Gerald Caliendo.

“In order to keep a dealership, you have to keep up with the Joneses and accommodate the look of the building,” Caliendo said.

The small automobile showroom can currently hold two cars. An expansion to the west of the building would allow a total of eight brand new vehicles to be displayed, dealership representatives said.

“We don’t really have a history of complaints with the business or site at all,” said Joseph Sollano, chair of the board’s Douglaston Zoning Committee. “It seems that what they’re asking for is somewhat minor and understandable.”

Construction, slated to take about four to six months, will be fenced off and contained within the property, Caliendo said. Dealership officials said it will not obstruct adjacent properties or traffic.

About 20 more parking spots for employees and customers would be created with the deck, officials said.

 

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CB 11 Transportation Committee denies speed bump request, recommends major highway change


| mchan@queenscourier.com

Two speed bump proposals were struck down and a major highway change was recommended during a Community Board 11 Transportation Committee briefing this week.

The committee denied a speed bump request on 36th Avenue between 218th and 219th Streets in an attempt to prevent pushing the traffic problem over to 38th Avenue.

“We concluded that it would not do any good to put speed bumps on those streets,” said Chris Petallides, who co-chairs the committee.

“When you’re trying to slow down traffic, you’re just transferring the problem to the next street,” he continued. “A truck will just conveniently move over the next street, rather than drive down the street with speed bumps.”

Another proposal for a bump on 36th Avenue between Bell Boulevard and Corporal Stone Street was also shut down.

Petallides and co-chair Bernard Haber said traffic at that location is caused by double-parked cars from a nearby school and not by speeding motorists.

The pair of consulting engineers did, however, suggest the board reach out to the state’s Department of Transportation (DOT) for a traffic study of the Long Island Expressway (LIE) exit on the southbound Clearview Expressway.

Traffic gets backed up on the Clearview past Northern Boulevard from motorists waiting to get onto the LIE, Petallides and Haber said.

The board’s Traffic Committee said the state DOT should widen or turn the exit into two lanes.

The committee also suggested removing obstructive advertisements on a problematic bus shelter at the northeast corner of Union Turnpike and Springfield Boulevard.

Drivers going west on Union, who are trying to turn north on Springfield, “cannot see a pedestrian crossing Springfield,” Petallides said, because the shelter hinders the view.

The committee chose to take the less ambitious route over getting rid of the entire shelter, which straphangers use to get out of the rain while waiting for the bus.

“If that works, fine. If not, we’ll remove the shelter,” Petallides said.

Members were also all in favor of removing overnight parking restrictions from 35-30 Francis Lewis Boulevard to 36-34 Francis Lewis Boulevard to free up spaces for nearby residents.

 

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Board votes to write Cuomo over plane noise


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Community Board 11 voted unanimously on a resolution to support a bill that would require the Port Authority of New York & New Jersey to conduct a noise study after the Federal Aviation Administration approved a new flight pattern over the area last year.

The bill would determine the effects of aircraft noise on Brooklyn, Queens, Long Island and New Jersey residents and would require the Port Authority to hold biennial public hearings.

It has already passed the New York State Legislature and has been introduced in the New Jersey State Senate. The legislation needs approval from both state governors and would require the bi-state authority to submit their findings to both state legislatures.

Community Board 11 Chair Jerry Iannece said he would begin drafting a letter to Governor Andrew Cuomo soon.

 

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Community to city: Preserve Udalls Cove Park


| mchan@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Melissa Chan

Queens preservationists and a local community board want the city to save some of the last remaining parcels of Udalls Cove Park from development.

Several acres of privately owned wetlands and wooded uplands in the park’s ravine have come under new threat, according to Community Board 11 and the Udalls Cove Preservation Committee.

“This week we have learned that the owner of most of that land now seeks to sell it,” said Walter Mugdan, the committee’s president. “That means the threat of development within the park boundary has arisen once more.”

Advocates say the cove’s salt water marshes and freshwater wetlands are a sanctuary for wildlife in the city.

An inlet of Little Neck Bay between Douglaston and Great Neck, it is home to a variety of animals including salamanders, muskrats and the occasional fox, nearby residents said.

“It’s one of the last salt marshes in the city of New York at least on the north shore,” said CB 11 chair Jerry Iannece.

Neighbors of the city and state owned portion of Udalls Cove at Virginia Point said they fear development near the deep-wooded ravine will ultimately spread to other parts of the park.

“Everything is connected, like in nature,” said resident Chris DeGeorge. “Once one property is developed, it’s like Pandora’s box. I don’t want it to have a cascading effect.”

Mugdan and CB 11 sent letters to the mayor, calling for the city to buy five of the last remaining privately owned 15 parcels. The five connected lots total to about 1.4 acres.

“It just makes sense that we go out there and try to buy this property before a developer goes out there and puts houses on it,” Iannece said.

More than 80 percent of the ravine’s 14.25 acres has already been bought and saved from development since the 1980s, according to the groups.

Several acres were almost developed into 18 houses in 2004, Mugdan said, until the city bought and put the land into its Udalls Cove Wildlife Preserve.

The city’s Parks Department, which manages the preserve, said it wants to work with the community and its elected officials to complete the purchase of the rest of the property.

“Strengthening Udall’s Cove Park is a priority for the administration and we are exploring every possible means of preserving these parcels,” a department spokesperson said.

Supporters said Udalls Cove Park should remain a “unique” part of the borough.

“That separates us,” said DeGeorge, who likes to kayak in his backyard salt marshes. “When I have people over, they never believe this is Queens.”

The property owner did not return calls for comment as of press time.

“You need to preserve all of it to keep it in its pristine condition,” Iannece said, “and let nature do what nature does best.”

 

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Star of Queens: Janet McEneaney, president of Queens Quiet Skies, Community Board 11 member


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Janet McEneaney

COMMUNITY SERVICE: Janet McEneaney works as an attorney, arbitrator and mediator and is a professor on the adjunct faculty at New York University, where she teaches law and business subjects, in addition to her work with the community. After experiencing some neighborhood problems shortly after McEneaney arrived in Bayside, she began a civic association.

In 2008, State Senator Tony Avella appointed McEneaney to serve as a member of Community Board 11. In 2012, after noticing an increase in noise from airplanes, McEneaney organized Queens Quiet Skies.

“Queens Quiet Skies has worked with Congressmembers Steve Israel and Grace Meng, Senator Tony Avella, Assemblymember Ed Braunstein, many other elected officials and representatives of aviation community groups and municipalities in Queens, Brooklyn, Nassau County and northern New Jersey,” explained McEneaney. “Together we have pushed to established a Community Aviation Roundtable, to increase the number of noise monitors on the runways at our local airports, to convince the FAA to implement a current environmental study rather than relying on a study from 2007, as they plan to do, and to have the Port Authority conduct noise compatibility studies in our communities around the airports.”

BACKGROUND: McEneaney was born in Brooklyn, lived in Rego Park for 25 years, then moved to Bayside where she has lived since. McEneaney received her J.D. degree from the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law and a Masters of Law degree from the University of Leicester School of Law in England.

FAVORITE MEMORY: “My best recent moment was when we received a letter from the entire Congressional delegation headed by Senators Charles Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand that endorsed the establishment of a Community Aviation Roundtable; that felt like a victory for everybody.”

BIGGEST CHALLENGE: McEneaney says her biggest challenge has been “to not get bogged down in interpersonal relationships and to always keep your eyes on the prize.”

INSPIRATION: “I’ve been thinking a lot about [advocate] Bella Abzug, she really was somebody who was committed to the welfare of ordinary New York people. There have been a lot of people who have worked very hard for the benefit of their communities, and they have been my inspiration.”

MELISSA FERRARI

 

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Community board chair fires back at Walcott over school employee threats


| mchan@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/File photo

The city’s schools chancellor chastised a community board leader after residents allegedly threatened his employees at a rowdy Bayside meeting last week.

“I would never allow anyone to be treated in this manner and would expect that you have the same standard,” Dennis Walcott said.

The head of the city’s public education system expressed his “extreme dismay” at a heated Community Board 11 meeting last Monday, when one male and one female resident allegedly verbally threatened two School Construction Authority (SCA) officials.

An older man approached Chris Persheff, the SCA’s Queens site selection manager, called him a liar and threatened to break his legs, The Courier reported last week.

After that, an unidentified person allegedly followed Persheff’s partner, Monica Gutierrez, by car until Gutierrez pulled into an empty lot, city reps said.

The SCA officials were pitching a plan to build an elementary school for 416 students at 210-11 48th Avenue when the May 6 meeting grew contentious.

They plan to file a police report and might take legal action against the alleged belligerents, Gutierrez said.
The altercations occurred after the meeting had adjourned.

In a letter, Walcott said Community Board 11 Chair Jerry Iannece “enabled this behavior by not drawing any boundaries to the abuse.”

He said the proposed new school would alleviate overcrowded facilities in the area. But enraged residents said it would destroy their quality of life, worsen parking and traffic congestion and lead to dangerous crossing conditions for students.

Iannece fired back in a letter, defending his decade-long, “impeccable” reputation for fairness and order.

“As an uncompensated volunteer who has spent countless hours for the betterment of my community, I take personal offense by your remarks,” he said. “It is an affront to me and to all community board chairs, [who] do so much for our city.”

The community board’s education committee said bringing P.S. 130 back to their district would relieve area school congestion. The 200-01 42nd Avenue school is located within District 26, but has mostly served students from District 25 for at least two decades.

Moving the school back to its original district has long been deemed unviable by education officials.

Iannece invited the schools chancellor to review the meeting’s recorded minutes, which he said include a “poor presentation” by the SCA officials.

The two residents’ identities were not known as of press time.

“Although I can appreciate your desire to protect the staff,” Iannece said, “misplaced anger, compounded by erroneous accusations, doesn’t help.”

 

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City may take legal action after contentious Bayside community board meeting


| mchan@queenscourier.com

The city might take legal action after two school construction officials were threatened Monday at a contentious community board meeting.

Bayside residents were enraged at a proposal by the city’s School Construction Authority (SCA) to build a 416-seat elementary school at 210-11 48th Avenue.

They said it would destroy their quality of life, worsen parking and traffic congestion and lead to dangerous crossing conditions for students.

But two attendees took it too far, said Monica Gutierrez, one of two SCA representatives who pitched the application at the May 6 hearing.

Gutierrez said a woman in her 60s approached the pair of speakers after the meeting adjourned and verbally threatened them. Someone then allegedly followed Gutierrez in a car until she pulled into an empty lot.

“She said, ‘You’ll have what’s coming to you. You’ll see,’” Gutierrez said. “When you threaten somebody, there are repercussions. They’re not above the law. They acted very barbaric.”

An older man also approached Chris Persheff, the agency’s Queens site selection manager, at the end of the meeting. The man called Persheff a liar and threatened to break his legs, according to the manager.

“I’ve done this a lot,” he said. “Usually the audience can sort of separate whatever I’m saying with the issue at hand. I’ve never had this personalized before like this.”

Gutierrez said the angry resident “tried to be all up against” Persheff. She said she grabbed the man and told him to calm down.

“It’s too vulnerable of a position to be in,” Persheff said. “It’s just unacceptable.”

Community Board 11 Chair Jerry Iannece said emotions were high, but the threats were uncalled for.

“The residents are very frustrated. They’re skeptical about what they don’t know,” he said. “But I don’t condone violence in any form. There’s no place for intimidation.”

Gutierrez said the city may take legal action against the alleged verbal assailants.

A spokesperson for the city’s Department of Education said the department is “taking appropriate action.”

Schools Chancellor Dennis Walcott expressed his “extreme dismay” of the fracas in a letter to Iannece. He said the community board chair “enabled this behavior by not drawing any boundaries to the abuse.”

“I would never allow anyone to be treated in this manner and would expect that you have the same standard,” Walcott said.

Persheff said he would file a police report but had no further comment.

The two residents’ identities were not known as of press time.

“We’ve been in bad neighborhoods, low economic areas, and they treat us with respect,” Gutierrez said. “Yes, they voice their minds, but they respect people.”

“It’s sad,” she continued. “These people are adults, and that’s how they are treating people. We’re just out there trying to do our jobs.”

 

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Bayside residents oppose school in place of Keil Bros Garden Center


| mchan@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Melissa Chan

Build a school, say Bayside residents, just not in our backyards.

Community Board (CB) 11 voted against a controversial proposal to build an elementary school in the place of a popular garden center after enraged residents who live near the 210-11 48th Avenue site vehemently opposed it.

“This area is saturated with schools, and we can’t stand it anymore,” said resident Mandingo Tshaka. “Hell, no. That’s all I’m going to say.”

The owners of Keil Bros Garden Center and Nursery have struck a deal with the city to sell their entire Bayside property, including a home next to the store, for an undisclosed amount.

Ronald Keil, vice president of the family-run business, cited “the changing nature of the retail world” and “increasing costs of doing business” as reasons for the sale.

“Basically, it’s an uncertain economy,” he said.

Residents said the 416-seat school would destroy their quality of life, worsen parking and traffic congestion and lead to dangerous crossing conditions for students.

“It’s really a disaster in the making,” said Toby Pagano, 64, of Bayside. “I would be horrified, but not surprised, if there was an accident.”

There are 21 elementary schools in the district and 12 within CB 11’s jurisdiction, according to Susan Seinfeld, district manager of Community Board 11.

Local educators said the majority of them are heavily congested, with registration growing every year.

At least three schools have had to put classrooms in space originally meant for libraries or music, Seinfeld said.

“There’s an opportunity for a school to be built,” P.S. 41 Principal Sari Latto said. “We’re hoping that will alleviate some of that overcrowding.”

No designs for a new school have been laid out yet, according to School Construction Authority officials. The site selection process began in 2008 and honed in on the disputed site last month.

According to Keil, the city approached his 83-year-old business within the last two years. He said he and his brother are exploring options to continue the store in another part of Queens.

The garden center will be open for regular business for the rest of the year.

CB 11’s advisory vote now heads to the City Council for a final ruling.

“I do get the need for new schools,” said resident Carol Shriver, 55. “I understand that. But this is wrong. This is just the wrong place to build a school. They’re just asking for trouble.”

 

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Star of Queens: Ted Teng, chair, Youth Services Committee of Community Board 11, state committeeman of 25th Assembly District


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Ted Teng

COMMUNITY SERVICE: Ted Teng is prone to say “in any way you can” when talking about giving back to the community.

Teng, who immigrated from Taiwan to New York City at age 2, has been the chair of the Youth Services Committee of Community Board 11 for the past three years and state committeeman of the 25th Assembly District since last September.

One of the CB 11 initiatives closest to Teng’s heart is the fight to keep the Beacon Program in Bayside alive. The program, which offers free after-school and summer school services to more than 700 students, is currently under threat of being shut down.

Teng’s favorite part of the job is advocacy for the community’s children and his “conversations with individuals who find themselves to be voiceless.”

“I love the fact that I can give a voice to these people,” he said.

BACKGROUND: A volunteer emergency medical technician, or EMT, for years since his college days at Stony Brook University, Teng has been known to pull over while driving to assist car accident victims. His experiences as an EMT first taught him the value of giving back.

“From there I learned the importance of helping the community in any way I can,” he said.

Outside of his volunteer work, Teng is the founder of Advanced Teaching Initiative, an after-school academic center that also runs weekend programs and summer camps.

FAVORITE MEMORY: Looking back on his most memorable moment working with the community board, Teng spoke of a letter by a Beacon Program participant. She wrote about what the program meant to her.

“The thing that spoke with me was the program’s not just about academics,” he said. “It’s social skills, arts and crafts. It really gives children a chance to learn new things.”

BIGGEST CHALLENGE:  Teng said one of the biggest challenges facing the board is “getting the public to know the problems we have.” He said he hopes the future board will work on stronger outreach to “bring more voice and more press involvement.”

INSPIRATION: Teng said his two young children inspire him more than anything else.

“A lot of it is the ability to show them that especially in this area where I grew up, [it’s important to] go back to your roots and give back to it,” he said. “You do what you can. If you’re in the position to help, you should help. I was very fortunate. I was put in a very fortunate position to make a difference.”

-BY ROSA KIM

 

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Bayside rallies to save after-school program


| mchan@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Melissa Chan

A community rallied in Bayside to save a beloved Beacon program from another year of budget cuts.

“This feels like déjà vu. Year in and year out, we have more and more budget cuts,” said Assemblymember Nily Rozic. “We cannot balance budgets on the backs of our students.”

The after-school enrichment program at M.S. 158 Marie Curie is slated for closure at the end of the school year. It was saved from the chopping block by the City Council last year after the Department of Youth and Community Development tried to shut down seven Beacons across the city.

“These types of cuts go on year after year. It’s a continual battle with the city to restore the funding,” said State Senator Tony Avella. “We have a fight on our hands, but the community stands behind this Beacon center.”

Beacon has been a “support system” for 20 years and the only program within Community Board 11, said Martenia Miller, site director of the school’s Beacon program.

More than 100 students take part in the enrichment program daily. Nearly 70 of them are on the school’s honor roll, Miller said.

Community Board 11 chair Jerry Iannece said the city mistakes the program as a luxury.

“This is a necessity,” he said. “Although we live in an affluent area with nice homes, lots of the kids who go to the Beacon program are kids who need it. We all have to rally our forces, circle our wagons and do everything we can to keep this program here.”

Beacon operates after school, on weekends, school holidays and throughout the summer. It focuses on leadership and skill growth, serving youth and adults.

There are 80 Beacon programs citywide.

Miller said the program at M.S. 158 boasts a talented chamber orchestra, a dance team, literacy classes and gym.

“Beacon helps kids get a place to stay, helps unemployment, helps kids socialize and become more active,” said Anna Poubouridis, 13. “In my opinion, those are some very important things.”

 

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Star of Queens: Paul Di Benedetto, president, Bayside Historical Society


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

QC03282013

BY ANTHONY O’REILLY

COMMUNITY INVOLVMENT: As president of the Bayside Historical Society, Paul Di Benedetto heads the board of directors and helps to define its mission.

The group, formed in 1964, works to archive and preserve Bayside’s history by maintaining those properties that have already been landmarked, as well as working to landmark other sites in Bayside. Di Benedetto said the group was originally formed to save Fort Totten and the Lawrence Cemetery. The two sites are now a NYC landmark and since then the society has been working to provide maintenance for both.

The society also works to educate people about Bayside’s history.

Di Benedetto has been president of the society for a year. He is also a member of Community Board 11.

BACKGROUND: Di Benedetto has been living in Bayside since 1995. He said he originally moved there because of its proximity to Manhattan, where he was working at the time, and fell in love with the historical houses in the area.

FAVORITE MEMORY: Di Benedetto says his favorite memory in working with the society is seeing the look of joy in children, and even adults, as they learn of the area’s history. “It’s great to see how they take [history] up too and how it relates to them.”

INSPIRATION: Di Benedetto said he didn’t like the fact that land developers would come in and destroy many of the homes in the area.

“I didn’t like the fact that developers and short-sighted people were coming and buying the houses,” he said. “They’d clear the properties and put all this asbestos in the air.” In working with the society, Di Benedetto hopes to halt, if not completely stop, this kind of development.

BIGGEST CHALLENGE: “It’s a lack of understanding,” Di Benedetto said about trying to get sites landmarked. “People are afraid for some reason.” Di Benedetto said he tries to get people to understand that by landmarking a site, their house or property is “locked in time.”

 

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Community board blocks developer


| mchan@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Melissa Chan

A notorious Queens developer has hit a roadblock in Bayside after a community board unanimously voted down a variance that would have allowed him to complete construction in the area.

Tommy Huang — whose properties have racked up a laundry list of complaints and violations, according to the city’s Department of Buildings (DOB) — was denied variance approval by Community Board 11, meaning he may not be able to finish constructing four single-family homes in Bayside.

The properties in question — located at 39-39 223rd Street and 39-01, 39-15 and 39-19 Mia Drive — have been a problem site for years, local leaders said. The 223rd Street site has accumulated 93 complaints and 46 violations from city agencies so far, according to the DOB.

The controversial builder’s “shoddy” developments have also been allegedly tied to the death of an immigrant worker last year in Elmhurst when a 20-foot faulty concrete wall constructed by Huang’s company collapsed on top of him, State Senator Tony Avella said.

“[He] is no stranger to the Queens community. He is infamous in engaging in unscrupulous building practices on a repeated basis, with his unsafe construction practices dating back almost 20 years,” said Avella. “Previous patterns of behavior are the best indicator of future behavior.”

According to Community Board 11’s district manager Susan Seinfeld, board members felt the work permits Huang received back in 2004 were obtained “erroneously and improperly to begin with.”

“It was a misuse of the zoning done purposely,” she said.

The development was also deemed an “interior lot” and not a “through-lot,” officials said, which means Huang may be violating zoning resolutions if he does not include a 30-foot rear yard as required for the site.

The variance application will still need to go through the borough president’s office and then to the Board of Standards and Appeals, Seinfeld said, but there is currently a stop work order on the homes, which are built but not completely finished.

“This was a recommendation to the Board of Standards and Appeals to please not approve the variance because it was wrong to begin with,” Seinfeld said.