Tag Archives: College

LIU Post: Education for the New Economy

By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Roth Hallw

A new economy is emerging from the challenges of recent years, and LIU Post is helping individuals and businesses position themselves to make the most of advancements and opportunities.

LIU Post (formerly known as the C.W. Post Campus of Long Island University) offers certificate, bachelor’s and master’s degrees and corporate training programs that promote new ways of thinking, the latest technology, and unprecedented convenience.

Rated a Best Regional University by U.S. News & World Report and located only 20 minutes by car from Queens, LIU Post offers more than 260 programs of study at located at 720 Northern Boulevard (Route 25A) in Brookville.  Courses are available on campus and online during the days, evenings, and weekends throughout the year.

“We are confident about the future, and we’re investing in academic programs that will make it possible to help businesses thrive in the new economy,” says Dr. Paul Forestell, provost of LIU Post, a campus of Long Island University, one of the largest private universities in the nation. “Whether in emerging fields or mainstay industries, a college education can help everyone achieve greater success and fulfillment.”

Business and Accountancy Education

Long known as a leader in business and accountancy education, the College of Management at LIU Post offers a constellation of programs and services for business, accountancy and taxation professionals.

The LIU Post School of Professional Accountancy was the first autonomous school of its kind in the nation. Founded in 1974, the School prepares students for careers as accountants, tax preparers and estate and financial planners. The School offers the M.S. in Accountancy with concentrations in professional accountancy or taxation as well as an M.S. in Taxation. Many courses are available in the blended format, which combines online learning with face-to-face studies.

Accredited by AACSB International, a distinction shared by only 5 percent of business schools worldwide, the LIU Post Master of Business Administration (MBA) is one of the New York metro area’s premier business programs. For the past nine years, LIU Post has been rated one of the “Best Business Schools” in the country by The Princeton Review.

“The business model for success in the 21st century is about freeing your thinking from out-of-date ideas and practices,” said Dr. Andrew Rosman, dean of the College of Management at LIU Post. “LIU Post helps you and your employees to gain more expertise in an area that is already familiar to them but may be changing as market conditions or technology evolves.”

Entering the Technological World

This September, LIU Post is launching a number of programs to meet technological advances of the 21st century.

The Mobile GIS Applications Development program, an online advanced certificate, can help businesses market their products using apps on wireless devices. They will learn how to create apps that pinpoint a client’s geographical positioning and responds with advertisements and tweets of sales and deals within close proximity of their business.

The M.S. program in Environmental Sustainability, the only degree of its kind on Long Island, trains private and public sector professionals to develop business strategies that take into account issues posed by climate change, development, population growth and energy consumption.

An online advanced certificate in Archives and Records Management, offered by LIU Post’s nationally recognized Palmer School of Library and Information Sciences, trains individuals to create and manage electronic records and archives. “Effective recordkeeping is important for all businesses,” said Dr. Gregory Hunter, the director of the Archives and Records Management Program and the Ph.D. in Information Studies at LIU Post. “Whether it is a corporation complying with Sarbanes-Oxley, a hospital implementing electronic health records, or a non-profit institution retaining records related to a grant project, the certificate program prepares professionals to handle and process vast amounts of information and maintain accessible records.”

Corporate Training

For more immediate and highly customized programs, LIU Post’s School of Continuing Education offers on-site training and continuing-education classes at local businesses. From weekly courses and seminars to professional institutes and workshops, LIU Post Corporate Training Programs cover human resources, management and supervision, training and organizational development, computer skills, financial planning, sales and customer service and business communication.

Adult Undergraduate Degree Completion Opportunities

LIU Post also offers a new undergraduate degree completion program for adult learners. This program caters to those who are over the age of 25 who are starting college for the first time or returning after a long absence to complete their bachelors’ degrees. The university offers five bachelor’s degree programs that can be completed entirely during the evening: business administration, health care administration, accountancy, psychology and criminal justice.

For more information about LIU Post, visit www.liu.edu/post or call the Office of Public Relations at 516-299-2334.

$1 Trillion in Student Debt

| brennison@queenscourier.com

The Courier/Photo by Billy Rennison

Here is what you can buy with $1 trillion: 5 million Lamborghinis, 15,000 private jets, 140 private islands and every team in baseball 16 times. Simply put, it is a lot of money.

The number — which is much more jarring when written out, 1,000,000,000,000 — is also the amount of debt students in this country collectively hold from their college loans. It is a backbreaking number, and an amount many feel is devastating their future.
A degree has become a prerequisite for employment, and rising tuitions means, for many, that debt is a precondition for entry into the workforce, so students have decided to fight back.

A rally was held on April 25 in Union Square to coincide with 1T Day — the day student loan debt hit $1 trillion — to raise awareness about the crisis and to begin a movement toward free college education.

Hundreds of protesters wore placards around their neck declaring the size of their debt, from relatively small amounts, like Jessica K.’s $13,000, to immense amounts, like Francis Rogers’ $108,000.

“Trillion dollar day is a reminder that private banks are still very much in the predatory lending business; this time it’s students not homeowners,” said Professor Andrew Ross, an organizer with the Occupy Student Debt 1TDay campaign.
The histrionics of the event — there were super heroes and choruses and even “Sallie May” showed up — did not overshadow the frustration of the hundreds of thousands of students drowning in debt.

“I’m the first person in my family to go to college,” said Annie Spencer, a CUNY graduate student. “I’m now $80,000 in debt and don’t see a day when I won’t struggle to make ends meet. Those of us who took on this trillion dollar debt were sold the promise of a better life in exchange for carrying the burden, but the deck was stacked against us from the start.”

More than two-thirds of graduates leave college with student loan debt, according to a 2008 study. The average debt for these 1.4 million students is more than $27,000.
The students at the Union Square protest — and many other groups that have taken up similar fights — do not believe all college should be free or that, as a rule, loans should not be repaid. Their tenets are that public college should be free — as it had been in New York until the 1970s — and that student loans should be repaid interest free.
“The goal of these protests isn’t to renege on our responsibilities, it is to make the institutions making billions of dollars on the backs of students take some responsibility,” said Stephanie, a New York University graduate with $90,000 in debt. “They want us to default.”

More than 40 percent of students from the class of 2005 have faced default and/or delinquency, according to the Occupy Student Debt Campaign.
The demonstrations eventually made their way toward Wall Street, though not before parking itself in front of a bastion for tuition-free — for now — education, Cooper Union, where one dissenter, who identified himself as Jesse, stood atop the Peter Cooper Memorial.

For students that dream of a tuition-free college education, Copper Union is their Shangri-la — well, it was. From 1902 until today the college charged no tuition, instead relying on a generous endowment providing each student a scholarship — furthering the school’s founder Peter Cooper’s belief that education should be free, and for more than a century his ideal held true at the school bearing his name.

But, in April, the school announced that it would begin charging tuition for select graduate programs. This flew in the face of what many students felt the school stood for.
So, Jesse stood atop the school’s founder’s memorial with a sign reading, “No tuition, it’s our mission,” leading to a two hour standoff with police before he was taken down in a cherry picker and arrested.

Cooper Union’s shift toward tuition mirrors the nation-wide trend of exploding college costs. In the past five years tuition at public universities has increased 24 percent, and 17 percent at private colleges.

This has led — obviously — to a steep incline in the amount of debt students leave college with. Thirty years ago the number was $2,000, a full $25,000 below today’s amount. Inflation makes up only a small amount of the difference; $2,000 in today’s value is just under $5,000.
“I’m pretty much carrying a mortgage, I guess the American dream of owning your own home is out the window for me,” said Valerie Young, a 23-year-old with more than $100,000 in loans. “I can’t live in my degree.”

Indebted student’s plight has reached Capitol Hill where politicians are debating bills that would prevent student’s interest rates from doubling in July, an issue President Barack Obama has been speaking out against.

“When kids do graduate, the most daunting challenge can be the cost of college. At a time when Americans owe more in tuition debt than credit card debt, this Congress needs to stop the interest rates on student loans from doubling in July,” Obama said in his State of the Union address. “Of course, it’s not enough for us to increase student aid. We can’t just keep subsidizing skyrocketing tuition; we’ll run out of money. States also need to do their part, by making higher education a higher priority in their budgets. And colleges and universities have to do their part by working to keep costs down.”

Burning Mad

“My future is going up in flames with each loan bill I’m getting and can’t repay because I don’t have a job, and the interest just keeps pushing the bill higher,” said Frederick Iman after he lit his student loan bill on fire. “So I might as well burn my bill, too.”
Iman was not the only protestor to turn their bills to ashes, others joined in sending smoke signals that they are here to end predatory loan practices.
Though the economy shows signs of recovery, college graduates unemployment rate is still well above the average and a recent Rutgers University study found that only half of graduates between 2006 and 2010 graduates have found full-time jobs.
“[Lenders] are making money off every graduate and even more money when we can’t find jobs,” said Mark, an unemployed graduate of Miami (Ohio) University who lit his loan bill. “Someone has to stand up for us, it might as well be us.”
It is not only the Occupy Student Debt Campaign and its supporters that are attempting to reform lending practices for students.
Student Loan Justice (www.studentloanjustice.org) is another organization that is dedicated to returning standard consumer protections to student loans. The group has created a Student Borrower Bill of Rights that aims to bring these standard protections back. Currently, student loans are not forgiven in bankruptcy proceedings — the only type of loan that applies to.

The EDU Debtors Union (www.edudebtorsunion.org) believes that students in debt are akin to factory workers.
“Factory workers go to work every day and transform capital into profit by making products,” EDU says. “Students transform capital into profit when interest and penalties are added to a principle loan.”

This method becomes unacceptable, they say, “when there are abuses to the many for the benefit of the few without a method of recourse.”
So EDU has started a union. They believe debtors can benefit from union representation. Large numbers, they believe, represents a better chance for students to negotiate better repayment methods with lenders.

This is a tactic that the Occupy Student Debt Campaign also believes holds power.
The campaign is circulating a petition that students pledge to stop making loan payments in hopes of restoring free public college education if 1 million students sign the pledge.

No End in Sight

Marches, protests and refusals to pay aid in shining a light on student’s plight, but the bills will continue to come. Without government intervention, change will be difficult. There are bills in Congress that aim to help students, but according to govtrack.us, they have little hope of passing.

“Because there are so many student loan lenders and types of loans, a general debt strike will not necessarily hit the heart of the beast,” EDU wrote in a blog entry. “To organize a debt strike effectively, you have to start with specific lenders otherwise the impact of the strike will not be felt.”

Only a few thousand have signed the Occupy campaign’s petition, well short of the million they need before the debt strike, and some are concerned about ruined credit.
I don’t want to pay back these loans — and honestly I can’t — but I’m worried that not paying anything will just ruin my credit for life,” said Michelle Condon. “[Lenders] practices must change and I will continue to fight, but unless we all band together and refuse to pay, what difference will be made?”

These campaigns are lighting the fire, but if the flame is suffocated with default notices and compounding interest, what is the next step?

“We just need to get the word out,” said Ryan Lindner, a graduate of Cortland University. “My credit is already crap, they can’t make it worse. I refuse to recognize them until they recognize my basic rights. I will not pay.”

Steve Lavin to undergo cancer surgery today

| brennison@queenscourier.com

Photo Courtesy of St. John's University

St. John’s Coach Steve Lavin will undergo surgery today to treat his prostate cancer which was diagnosed last fall.

Lavin, entering his second year on the Johnnies sideline, coached the Red Storm to their most successful season in a decade last year. It was only after the season that the school announced that the 47 year old had been diagnosed with an early stage of the disease during the season.

“The advantage of early detection is that we were afforded the time to research all options,” said Lavin. “After weighing treatment options with the experts at Sloan we have decided surgery is the best path to take for my particular prostate cancer condition.”

Lavin is expected to return to his coaching responsibilities after a short recovery period. The season kicks-off on October 15 with the team’s first practice following a tip-off event the prior night.

Memorial Sloan-Kettering’s chairman of the Department of Surgery, Peter T. Scardino, M.D. will perform the surgery. Scardino said that the coach should make a quick and full recovery. It is also highly likely that this treatment will eradicate the cancer, the doctor said

Lavin has involved himself with organizations promoting cancer research and awareness for the past decade, including Coaches vs. Cancer and The V Foundation for Cancer Research.

As part of the Coaches vs. Cancer Suits and Sneakers weekend, Lavin wore white Nike Air Force Ones during the Johnnies upset of Duke to help raise awareness and support the American Cancer Society. Claiming comfort and not superstition, Lavin continued to sport sneakers during games for the remainder of the season.

The Johnnies enter the season looking to build on their success of a year ago when a senior-laden team reached the NCAA tournament. The year’s team features just one returning player – junior guard Malik Stith – and includes seven freshmen.