Tag Archives: College Point

West Nile spraying in Queens this week


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of James Gathany/CDC

On Wednesday June, 12 and Thursday, June 13 there will be West Nile spraying in Queens to help reduce the mosquito population and the risk of the disease in the following areas:

Alley Pond Park: Alley Creek Marsh (areas inside Alley Pond Park)

Linden Hill/College Point: Abandoned Flushing Airport (Marsh areas bounded by Whitestone Expressway to the east; 20th Avenue to the north; 130th Avenue and Ulmer Street to the west; and Ulmer Street and 28th Street to the south)

Edgemere, Somerville: Dubos Point and Edgemere Park (Marsh areas bounded by Norton Basin to the east; Mott Point to the north; Grass Hassock Channel to the west; and Beach 65th Street, De Costa Avenue and Almeda Avenue to the south)

The spraying will take place between the hours of 6 a.m. and 7 p.m. In case of bad weather, the application will be delayed until Thursday, June 13 and Friday, June 14 during the same hours.

West Nile virus has not yet been detected anywhere in New York City this season, according to the Health Department.

VectoBac™ CG, VectoMax™ CG/FG and/or VectoLex™ CG/FG – all containing naturally occurring bacteria—will be used for this spraying. These larvicides are used throughout the mosquito season to treat mosquito breeding sites, and are approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the New York  State Department of Environmental Conservation.

Photo courtesy of NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

Call for middle school to replace St. Fidelis in College Point


| mchan@queenscourier.com

More than 200 residents in College Point have signed a petition calling for a middle school to replace soon-to-be shuttered St. Fidelis School.

“With St. Fidelis closing, we didn’t see it as a crisis but an opportunity,” said Andrew Rocco, president of the College Point Civic and Taxpayers Association. “People are flooding into College Point for the quality of life and great neighborhood. Why should we not have basic infrastructure like a middle school?”

The century-old Catholic elementary school at 124-06 14th Avenue will close this month due to declining enrollment and increased operating costs, The Courier previously reported.

Neighboring parishes will take in St. Fidelis students in the meantime, said Thomas Chadzutko, superintendent of Schools for the Diocese of Brooklyn.

But local leaders are pushing the city’s Department of Education (DOE) to consider replacing the pre-K through eighth grade institution.

“The population in College Point is increasing dramatically,” said State Senator Tony Avella. “The community has been asking for a middle school for the last five years.”

The lawmaker added that area students have to travel outside their neighborhood to attend junior high. It took some seventh and eighth graders two hours to get to and from J.H.S. 194 when the city temporarily took away yellow school bus service in 2010.

A DOE spokesperson said St. Fidelis is still being reviewed for a potential lease.

It could become another elementary school to ease overcrowding at College Point’s two existing pre-K through fifth grade facilities. However, local leaders say a middle school would be more helpful.

“We’re getting things put into our neighborhood that service the entire city, yet we can’t have basic infrastructure needs,” said Rocco, pointing to the new police academy and waste transfer station at College Point.

Community Board 7’s education committee does not have an official stance on the issue. But Chairperson Arlene Fleishman, a former District 25 school board president, said the district needs more elementary school seats. She rejected the idea that College Point needs a middle school because students currently have to go outside their neighborhood.

“All our children, no matter where they live, have to travel to middle schools,” she said, “and high schools are even further.”

Darren Kaplan of College Point said the area would ideally get both a middle and elementary school to accommodate new members of the growing population.

“The middle school situation is ridiculous,” the 52-year-old father said. “It’s a mess.”

Rocco said congested elementary schools now will only lead to overcrowded middle schools later.

“It’s not rocket science,” he said. “It’s pretty obvious. If the two elementary schools have kids packed in trailers outside, then there’s going to be a need for a junior high school because that’s next.”

 

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College Point stabbing suspect sought


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of NYPD

Police are asking for the public’s help in identifying and locating a man wanted for a College Point stabbing in March.

The  suspect stabbed the 22-year-old victim multiple times in front of 20-17 124th Street around 8:50 a.m. on March 24, fleeing in a light colored auto, according to the NYPD.

The victim was taken to the hospital where he was treated for his injuries.

Anyone with information in regards to this incident is asked to call Crime Stoppers at (800) 577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit their tips by logging onto Crime Stoppers website or can text their tips to CRIMES (274637), then enter TIP577. All calls are strictly confidential.

 

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Petco, other shops overcome Sandy setbacks


| tcullen@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photos by Terence M. Cullen

As the days and months since Sandy tick by, businesses in south Queens are rising from the rubble and returning to normalcy.

There was “paws” for applause on Saturday, April 27 as the Howard Beach Petco reopened. It had closed six months ago due to damage from Sandy.

Animals both big and small—all the way down to crickets—were evacuated before the storm, according to general manager Victor Aponte. He regularly communicated with his corporate affiliates. They decided to move the animals and their habitats to other locations in Queens and Brooklyn.

By the time flood waters from Sandy had ebbed back into Jamaica Bay, Petco and many other Cross Bay Boulevard businesses were considerably damaged. Aponte said floors had to be ripped up and the whole shop was inspected for mold.

Before the storm, there were 15 staffers at Petco, many of them living in the community. They were not only worried about damage to their homes and properties. They also had concerns about their jobs. However, staffers were relocated to other stores in Utica and College Point.

Now that the store has reopened, staff and community members couldn’t be happier, Aponte said.

Shoppers and their four-legged friends came to the store all day Saturday, making use of special bonuses and grabbing giveaways.

Rich Naimoli of Ozone Park said he had been shopping at another pet store on Cross Bay Boulevard, but it did not compare to the variety and help at Petco. He added that he and his wife, who own three dogs, were thrilled the Howard Beach pet shop was up and running again.

“I’m just happy they’re back,” Naimoli said.

Aponte said while Petco was part of a corporate chain, he and the staff have tried to make it a community place where residents can get one-on-one help. There are now 17 staff members in all. The reopening, he said, was another step toward normalcy half a year after Sandy devastated the area.

“It’s just exciting to get the neighborhood back to where we were before the hurricane,” Aponte said. “We really feel we’re a neighborhood store.”

According to State Senator Joseph Addabbo’s office, eight businesses are still closed on Cross Bay Boulevard. Some were able to bounce back just weeks after floodwater caused thousands of dollars worth of damage. For others, it’s been a major struggle.

It remains to be seen whether 7-Eleven and Jennifer Convertibles will reopen, However, Cross Bay Diner is slated to come back.

Joe DeCandia, owner of Lenny’s Clam Bar, was back in business less than a month after the storm. He worked practically around the clock on repairs. Now, he said, the popular eatery along with most of the boulevard is in good shape.

“We’re doing pretty good,” he said. “We’re up and running. We’re doing okay, thank God.”

 

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650 workers escape police academy fire without injury


| mchan@queenscourier.com

Above photo by Dominick Totino Photography/Additional photos by Melissa Chan

A fire broke out at the future Queens police academy Tuesday while more than 600 workers were on site, authorities said.

Flames erupted at 128-11 28th Avenue in College Point around 1:30 p.m., according to the FDNY.

Police and fire officials at the scene said the building’s exterior suffered the brunt of the blaze. There was minimal damage inside.

“We had a significant fire outside that was extending to the inside of the building,” said FDNY Deputy Assistant Chief Robert Maynes. “Once it got inside, we would have had a catastrophic amount of damage.”

There were 650 workers at the construction site when the fire began, a law enforcement source said, but none were hurt.

The exterior atrium’s enclosure was scorched and a small number of outside panels at the north side of the building will need to be replaced, according to a police source. The cost of the damage is yet to be determined.

Construction of the $656 million police academy is not expected to be delayed, the NYPD said. The first phase of the plan is still on track for completion in December.

About 175 firefighters responded to the blaze. The cause of the fire is under investigation.

 

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Court rules in favor of waste transfer station


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/File photo

They lost their bid to block the birds.

The Friends of LaGuardia Airport could not prevent a waste transfer facility, which will bring flocks of seagulls near the airport, from being built.

The U.S. Second Circuit Court of Appeals ruled in favor of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) on Tuesday, April 9 on jurisdictional grounds rather than on the merits of the case, said Ken Paskar, president of Friends of LaGuardia.

“I’m concerned that [the] decision would have people believe that the court ruled on the merits and interpret that to mean that the transfer station is safe,” said Paskar.

The North Shore Marine Transfer station is under construction in College Point and is expected to be completed later this year. The waste transfer station is located approximately 2,206 feet away from one of the major runways at LaGuardia.

With the station expected to handle 3,500 tons of residential garbage daily, Paskar believes the station will become a “bird magnet” for seagulls looking for food, and will lead to an increase in the danger of gull strikes in the air.

Even with the court’s decision, Paskar is looking to follow other legal options, including filing a motion for re-consideration on the court.

“Friends of LaGuardia must continue its fight to protect the traveling public from the risks of bird strikes in and out of LaGuardia Airport and the greater NY Metro area because the FAA, Port Authority and the City of New York are clearly not,” said Paskar. “It’s a long shot. We’re asking the court to look at their own decision and be consistent.”

The FAA did not respond as of press time.

 

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Community contributes to College Point family following tragedy


| mhayes@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Daniel Rinaldi

People the world over are helping one College Point family racked by tragedy.

The Malave family was driving home from a spring break vacation in Florida on Saturday, March 30 when they were reportedly hit by a driver heading down the wrong side of the road. Christian Malave, 11, was killed in the crash, and his parents Carlos and Hilda, and older sisters Melissa and Aly, were severely injured.

Days later, longtime family friend Daniel Rinaldi got the idea to raise money for the Malaves, potentially to help pay for their medical bills and funeral expenses. On Monday, April 1, Rinaldi set up a website with a fundraising goal of $1,000. A little more than a week after the crash, with the Malaves still in a Florida hospital, donations at home reached over $40,000.

“We’re still climbing,” said Rinaldi. “There’s no indication of slowing down or capping it.”

At the beginning, Rinaldi, 25, received donations from his immediate Queens community. Eventually, that spread to the entire state and now several donations have come in from overseas.

“I look at that picture of the family, and it’s been my motivation. I think it has been a lot of other people’s motivation in wanting to give back, too,” said Rinaldi. “They say, ‘You know what, this could have been me, my family; this could have been my little kid.’”

More than 600 people have contributed to the Malave fund. Rinaldi hopes that the money will further provide for the family and give them time to recover, whether they need to pay for a physical therapist or simply put food on the table.

In the span of just one day, the fund collected over $2,000.

“Money should be the very last thing this family must worry about at this time,” said Allison O’Hagan on the fundraising site. “DONATE DONATE DONATE!”

Promotions for the Malave fund have been done primarily via social media – the site has been shared more than 3,000 times on Facebook, and 500 times on Twitter. Rinaldi said he sent out a few emails requesting help, but that the entire project has been done without any banks or big corporations.

“It’s just regular people willing to give up the money they may have spent on their lunch,” he said.

The family, well-known in their neighborhood, is said to be one of the most wonderful families you could ever meet, and the youngest Malave was a pleasure to be around.

“Christian was a beautiful little boy. He had a smile that just lit up a room,” said Tracy Salerno on the Malave fund website. “Always polite, always respectful. Be very proud of the little man that you raised.”

The community has no plans of stopping their efforts anytime soon. The College Point Five Guys on 14th Avenue donated 10 percent of every purchase from Thursday, April 11 to the Malave fund.

“If we can take some stress away, and show them there are good people out there, we can make a difference,” said Rinaldi. “It’s about trying to help a family that didn’t deserve this to happen to them.”

If you would like to contribute, visit www.gofundme.com/2gy7cc.

 

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City Council strips Dan Halloran of funding power


| mchan@queenscourier.com

DAN HALLORAN

The City Council has voted to strip disgraced Councilmember Dan Halloran of his committee assignments and power to allocate funding.

Halloran faces federal charges for allegedly playing a key role in a conspiracy and bribery scheme to rig the mayoral election, authorities said.

Power to distribute funds in the 19th District now falls to Speaker Christine Quinn’s office and the Council’s entire Queens Delegation, according to Councilmember Leroy Comrie, the delegation’s chair.

“The entire delegation will be working closely, regarding funding, in consultation with his staff and all of the groups,” Comrie said. “It will be a delegation collaborative effort, working with the community and all the groups that have requested funding.”

Bayside and College Point residents in Halloran’s district recently voted to create kayak and canoe launches in Little Bay Park and restore a cultural institute as part of the city’s participatory budgeting process.

Halloran’s spokesperson Kevin Ryan said the Council will “most likely honor” the votes despite the funding freeze. But sources said the $1 million initiative could be in jeopardy.

“We’ll try to do as much as we can to keep the participatory budgeting,” said Comrie.

Meanwhile, a handful of state elected officials are fighting for a hand in allocating the district’s city funds.

“I have a real problem with someone from outside the district placing money,” said State Senator Tony Avella. “We know the district better than anyone else. We want to make sure the groups that deserve the funding in this district get the proper funding. That would be terribly unfair if the groups are disenfranchised.”

Avella and three assemblymembers who represent parts of the district have placed calls to the Speaker to be part of the decision making process.

“That’s not okay in my opinion,” Avella said. “None of them know the groups in this district.”

 

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Police arrest man connected to citywide grand larceny spree


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

suspects

Authorities have arrested a man tied to a robbery spree where the suspects trick victims by telling them they have a flat tire, then steal property from inside their vehicles.

Mario Gutierrez, 50 of College Point, has been charged with grand larceny for four out of 13 incidents that occurred in Queens.

Two additional robberies in Brooklyn and one in Manhattan are connected to those crimes.

 

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Two Queens teens accepted to US Air Force Academy


| mchan@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Melissa Chan

Two Queens teens have gotten their wings.

Seamus McCaffrey and Alan Mook have been accepted to the United States Air Force Academy. They are the only two in the borough who were given the elite nod this year.

“This is a dream come true,” said McCaffrey, 18, a senior at St. Francis Preparatory School. “It’s something surreal because I get to do what I want to do through serving my country. It’s a tremendous opportunity.”

McCaffrey, of Glendale, said he had his sights set on the skies since he was old enough to learn about planes.

“I’ve always wanted to be a pilot. Going to the Air Force was the only thing I really had in my mind,” he said. “I have a love for flight.”

The aspiring fighter pilot soared academically, with a cumulative 90 average, while leading as senior class president and playing on the school’s varsity football team. McCaffrey also serves as a sacristan at Sacred Heart Church in Glendale.

“He worked very hard for what he wanted. He put everything into it,” said his mom, Antoinette McCaffrey.

The trailblazer will be the first in his family to attend college, as well as enter the military, when he leaves for the Academy on June 26.

Meanwhile, Mook, 18, will be the second airman in his family. He joins his brother, Kevin, who is a junior at the Academy.

“It was all worth it,” said the College Point teen.

Mook, who graduated from Holy Cross High School last year, said his application was originally rejected by the Academy, but he was offered a scholarship to attend a prep school in New Mexico for one year.

Alan Mook (Photo courtesy of Holy Cross High School)

“When I was denied at first, it was very disappointing,” he said. “But I had another chance to get back in. I’m getting a degree from one of the best schools in the nation. Nothing beats that.”

Graduates of the free four-year program at the Colorado school agree to serve in the Air Force for at least five years.

Last year, three Queens students were given the green light by the Air Force Academy. McCaffrey and Mook beat out about 12,000 applicants this year, Academy officials said. Only about 1,200 get accepted annually.

“The candidates that have been getting in have been really reflecting the diversity of Queens, which is outstanding,” said Major Andrew Mattson, the academy’s Queens admissions liaison officer. “These are people taking on significant leadership roles. They are just great Americans.”

 

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Queens Argentinians proud of new pope


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy The New York Daily News

BY MAGGIE HAYES AND ANGY ALTAMARINO

The world has been watching Pope Francis, from the moment he was chosen to head the Catholic Church, to his first Sunday mass and the day of his first tweet.

“Popes not only head the church, but they are a moral compass for the world at large,” said Dr. Patrick McNamara from the American Catholic League. “They are the blanket moral leader of the world. People of all religions recognize that.”

When the papal conclave chose Archbishop Jorge Mario Bergoglio of Buenos Aires, Latin Americans around the world rejoiced. Latin America represents roughly half of the world’s Catholic population, and Queens residents hope that he can bring a new leadership to the church.

“I speak with my Argentinian heart when I say that God has blessed the whole world with Pope Francis, a being of light and so necessary for these difficult times the world is going through,” said Ivonne Sigaud, a Buenos Aires native living in College Point.

Many hope that Pope Francis can bring trust back to a church long plagued by scandal, while being a progressive leader that can conform with the modern times.

“I long for an urgent change in the [church], we need it in order to continue believing in it,” said Monica Insaurralde of Corona, also a Buenos Aires native. “I believe, hope, that this pope is the change.”

Also the first Jesuit pope, the Catholic community is wondering whether he will bring Jesuit attributes to his papacy. Typically seen as educators, Jesuits are known for open-mindedness when approaching everyday life.

“Jesuits were supposed to serve the pope, they weren’t supposed to become the pope,” said McNamara.“For a long time, [they] were seen as somewhat liberal. But I think he combines the best elements of progressive and traditional.”

Also the first pope of his name, Catholics around the world speculate he will draw inspiration from Francis of Assisi, a simple man known to empathize with and help the poor.

“[Pope Francis] was always a person who kept a low profile, a good man who was always on the side of humble,” said Hector Alberto Andrada from Buenos Aires, now living in College Point. “He walked the streets of Buenos Aires just like another citizen.”

Pope Francis reportedly never lived like the other Cardinals in Buenos Aires, but instead resided in his own apartment, took public transportation and actively worked with the people of Argentina.

“We are happy to know that they have trusted such a large mission to a simple man, recognized for his spirit of service,” said Fatima San Martin, a native of Misiones, Argentina. “They have put their eyes on South America, and specifically our Argentina.”

-With additional reporting by Anthony O’Reilly

 

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Queens pol wants to allow pet pigs in NYC


| aaltman@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photos by Alexa Altman

Despite citations, several swine owners are refusing to fork over the pork.

State Senator Tony Avella wants to overturn city guidelines prohibiting residents from owning domesticated pigs as pets after constituents squealed for support.

“I try to get the city to crack down on illegal construction, illegal contractors where workers have died, where neighboring property owners have been disenfranchised and they have to sue, and I can’t get the city to do as much enforcement on those serious construction sites as they are doing with one family with a very small pet,” said Avella.

“The city should be consistent with the level of enforcement it conducts across the board.”

Lou and Danielle Forgione picked up their porky pal after Danielle’s brother Peter was killed in a motorcycle accident in March 2012. Searching for a pet to lift the spirits of their six saddened children proved tricky when their six-year-old son Nicky displayed a severe allergy to pet dander. A pediatrician suggested they consider a pig. Ten months ago, the Forgione’s adopted Petey, named after Danielle’s late brother.

“[Petey] brings joy right back to us,” said Lou. “The kids were suffering in school. My wife was suffering from depression and anxiety. It brought the cheer right back to the family. He’s doing his job and he’s fantastic. You can’t ask for anything more.”

Since adopting Petey, the Forgiones have received several citations from the Health Department, including one that asked they “dispose” of their beloved pet. The co-op board of their Whitestone complex recently threatened to evict the family. Rather than relinquish Petey, the Forgione’s set their sights on more “pig friendly” pastures, selling their home and moving to Suffolk County.

“We really love him,” said Joseph, the Forgione’s 13-year-old son. “He’s a part of our family. He’s like a brother to me.”

Avella believes the rule against owning a pig is a Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) regulation, rather than a law that will need to be amended.

Navy veteran Nadine Darsanlal takes her 50-pound pet pig Wilbur to visit patients at hospitals and nursing homes and students at elementary schools. Darsanlal, who while in the service contracted bacterial meningitis that paralyzed her stomach and left her requiring the use a feeding tube and a pain pump, said she was “shocked” to discover the city outlawed ownership of the animal that brought happiness to her life and the lives of others.

“[Pigs] are gentler, they’re kinder, they’re more intelligent and they’re cleaner. They are just lovely animals to have,” said Darsanlal. “Not only does he help me out but I kind of want to give back and help others out.”

The College Point resident trained her precious piggy to complete small tasks, including retrieving items Darsanlal accidentally drops to keep her from having to painfully bend over. While Wilbur provides physical assistance, it’s the emotional support he gives that makes him more than just a pet.

“He’s a companion. He gets me up and going in the morning and helps me not think about my illness,” said Darsanlal. “It’s a lot that I’m dealing with, but I can deal with it because I’ve got my little baby.”

 

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City Council candidate Austin Shafran gains second union endorsement


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

File photo

Austin Shafran has gained the endorsement of UFCW Local 1500 in his bid for City Council.

“This is a high-priority council race for our members, and we know that Austin is the candidate who will fight the hardest to strengthen and expand the middle class,” said Bruce Both, president of the state’s grocery workers union.

Shafran, the 32-year-old former mainstay in the Cuomo administration, is in a four-way Democratic primary race to unseat incumbent Republican Dan Halloran in the 19th District. He was the vice president of public affairs for the governor’s Empire State Development until he resigned to run for office.

“I am deeply humbled and honored to have the endorsement of a union whose members and leader have done so much for working families,” Shafran said. “Retail is one of the fastest-growing sectors of our local economy, and I plan to work closely with Local 1500 to improve the quality and quantity of retail jobs that are the backbone of a strong middle-class-first economy.”

Shafran also recently gained the support of the Teamsters Joint Council 16.

He will take on Democratic State Committee Chair Matthew Silverstein, former Assemblymember John Duane and attorney Paul Vallone — the son of former City Council Speaker Peter Vallone Sr. and brother of Councilmember Peter Vallone Jr.

The district extends from College Point to the borders of Nassau County.

 

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College Point Catholic school shutting its doors


| mchan@queenscourier.com

The final bell will soon ring for a Catholic elementary school in College Point, officials said.

St. Fidelis School, at 124-06 14th Avenue, will close its doors for good in June after more than a century of serving the community, according to the Roman Catholic Diocese of Brooklyn, which oversees Queens.

“St. Fidelis School will be fully operational until the last day of school, continuing to provide a quality education,” said Monsignor Denis Heron, an administrator at the school. “We place our trust in God and ask His guidance as we move into the future. We ask your understanding and cooperation.”

The nursery through eighth grade institution faced declining enrollment and increased operating costs, officials said in a statement.

Enrollment at St. Fidelis dropped to 144 students this year from 242 five years ago, the Roman Catholic Diocese of Brooklyn said. Parish schools in Brooklyn and Queens, who serve kindergarten through eighth grades, are identified as “at-risk” of closing when enrollment falls below 225 students.

Diocese officials also said the parish, which opened in 1857, does not have “the financial resources to bridge the gap” between the $3,400 tuition per student and the actual $6,119 per-pupil costs.

Neighboring parishes will take in students from St. Fidelis, according to Thomas Chadzutko, superintendent of Schools for the Diocese of Brooklyn.

Plans are also underway, Chadzutko said, to place faculty members seeking teaching jobs at another Catholic school in Brooklyn or Queens on priority lists.

 

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Cuomo administration mainstay resigns to run for Queens City Council seat


| mchan@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Austin Shafran

A former mainstay in the Cuomo administration has officially announced his intent to run for City Council.

Austin Shafran, 32, resigned from his post as vice president of public affairs for Empire State Development (ESD) on January 18 to enter what is now a four-way Democratic primary race for the 19th District.

“I’ve played a leading role in Governor Cuomo’s efforts to make government work better, cost less and produce more for taxpayers,” Shafran said of his ESD job, “and now I want to put that same record of results to work for the communities I grew up in.”

He will take on Democratic State Committee Chair Matthew Silverstein, former Assemblymember John Duane and attorney Paul Vallone — the son of former City Council Speaker Peter Vallone Sr. and brother of Councilmember Peter Vallone Jr.

The primary winner will likely face off with incumbent Councilmember Dan Halloran in the November election if no other Republican contenders surface.

Shafran is the Democratic leader in the 25th Assembly District. The ESD’s mouthpiece for nearly two years, he also served as senior advisor to the agency’s head, Kenneth Adams. Prior, he was a community liaison for former Congressmember Gary Ackerman and communications director for then-Councilmember David Weprin.

“Working with Congressman Ackerman and Governor Cuomo, I’ve developed the experience and the clear vision to deliver better schools and safer streets and an economy that works for middle class families,” Shafran said. “Those are things that we’ve been lacking in these communities for the past four years. We can do better.”

The district extends from College Point to the borders of Nassau County.

 

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