Tag Archives: Colden Auditorium

Bill Cosby coming to Queens


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

Photo Courtesy of Erinn Chalene

Hey, hey, hey, Bill Cosby is coming our way.

On Saturday, April 6, one of America’s most beloved and respected comedians, will be taking the stage at the Colden Auditorium at Queens College to share his stories with anyone looking for a night filled with laughs.

“For me to perform at a college is usually an opportunity to speak and perform. I do not come out and do ‘educational questions;’ this is a performance,” he said. “You get Bill Cosby, the talking comedian who performs his own writings.”

No matter the generation gap or gender of his audience, Cosby has fascinated fans with his comedy routines, iconic albums and best-selling books. Cosby promises the upcoming show will be “hilarious” and will include the audience’s identification with the subject of conflicts at home, parenting, and relationships pertaining to the student.

“It’s not about the changing of a chair that the student sits in, or whether or not someone can record what the professor is saying or whether one has a computer or a number two yellow pencil,” he said. “It’s about the human beings.”

Having experience with raising five children with the former Camille Hanks, Cosby believes it is very important to bring such subjects out on stage and watch everyone laugh and have them know that the person talking to them knows something about their feelings.

“People come out saying things like ‘how did he get in my house?’” he quipped.

Cosby holds fond memories of Queens when the Huxtables made their move from Brooklyn to Astoria, spending many years filming “The Cosby Show” at Kaufman Astoria Studios and where later “Cosby,” a CBS comedy TV series, was also filmed for three years.

“Many times there are people who have shot their shows there and they always say ‘we were in your studio,’” he said.
Breaking television’s racial barrier with the series “I Spy” in the 1960s, Cosby became the first African American to costar in a television series while winning three consecutive Emmys. He also went on to create and produce the Emmy award-winning cartoon “Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids,” designed both to entertain and educate viewers.

With Cosby’s intent on portraying an American family, “The Cosby Show” was about a close-knit, upper middle class African-American family. The show conquered the number one spot for years, earning admiration for its contribution to American entertainment and culture.

In his current best-seller titled “I Didn’t Ask to Be Born, But I’m Glad I Was,” Cosby talks about everything from the Bible to being a grandfather.

For those not familiar with his style of performing, Cosby recommends they watch scenes from his recent appearances on “Late Night with Jimmy Fallon” or the “Late Show with David Letterman.”

Cosby’s performance is part of the Kupferberg Center for the Arts’ “Best of the Best Series.” Tickets are $35 to $65 and are available by calling the Kupferberg Center Box Office at 718-793-8080 or online at www.KupferbergCenter.org.

 

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Seinfeld comes home, performs at alma mater Queens College


| brennison@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of John Shearer

When Jerry Seinfeld emerged from behind the curtain at the Colden Auditorium, he was not only returning to his alma mater, but to the stage that helped launch his comedy career.

“This is where I started the whole damn thing,” Seinfeld said as he greeted the crowd at Queens College’s sold-out Colden Auditorium, his fourth of five shows in each of the city’s boroughs.

Seinfeld first landed on the Queens College stage in the 1970s as part of a student play.

“I was a reporter in the play and it wasn’t really supposed to be funny,” the Massapequa-born comedian remembered. “I came out and made the whole thing really funny and it wasn’t a comedy play.”

The director pulled him aside to remind him it wasn’t a comedy, Seinfeld said, “And I said, ‘Screw this acting thing, I’m going to [Manhattan comedy club] Catch a Rising Star.”

Between Catch a Rising Star and the Thursday, October 18 show, Seinfeld turned himself into a world-renowned comedian and co-creator of one of the most beloved sitcoms of all-time, “Seinfeld.”

Seinfeld, who helped write the show famously about nothing, still displayed the ability to riff on the frivolities of life, including a five-minute bit on breakfast and the magic of Pop-Tarts.

“Once there were Pop-Tarts, I did not understand why other types of food continued to exist,” Seinfeld joked. “My mother was shopping and preparing meals, I was like, ‘What are you doing, it’s over? You’ll never beat this.’”

Other topics touched on by the funnyman were marriage (“When you’re single you can oversleep a half hour and no one even notices”); energy drinks (“What does it even feel like to be in deficit of five hours of energy?”); and food (“Why is it that you can smell french fries through a three foot concrete wall?”).

But Seinfeld also focused on Queens in the homecoming show. It was his first time back to the school since he received an honorary doctorate in 1994.

“I am so happy to be back in Queens. I love Queens,” he said.

Students and residents can easily identify with the grief Seinfeld remembered from his two years at Queens College: Parking problems and the misnamed Utopia Parkway.

“At what point was that a utopia?” said Seinfeld, who carried a double major while at the school, communication and arts and sciences.

“I took two majors because both of those are about half a major together.”

Following the 75-minute show, Seinfeld returned to the stage to take questions from the audience.

When asked for a favorite episode, Seinfeld said he gets foggy on which stories go with which episode, but rattled off a few treasured scenes: the golf ball in the blowhole of the whale, George accidentally poisoning his fiancée with toxic envelopes and Jerry stealing the rye bread from the old lady.

Currently, Seinfeld is filming an Internet show “Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee,” which is exactly what the name implies. Seinfeld will pick up a comedian in an exotic car and they’ll chat and quip while driving and sitting down for a coffee or meal.

Among those featured on the show was his “Seinfeld” co-creator Larry David, who rode in a 1952 VW Bug.

But those awaiting a reunion show will not be hearing “Seinfeld, party of four,” any time soon.

“When you sit in those director chairs, it’s just depressing,” Seinfeld said. “Yeah, it’s great, it’s great … it’s over.”

Jerry Seinfeld to perform stand-up in Queens


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Twitter/@JerrySeinfeld

The comedian and former television star will do stand-up shows in all the five boroughs this fall, including one on October 14 at the Colden Auditorium at Queens College in Flushing, reported Playbill.com. Tickets will go on sale to the general public on July 30 at 10 a.m.

Seinfeld, who went to school in Queens, has not performed a full show in New York City in 14 years.

Manhattan
Thursday, Oct. 4, 2012
The Beacon Theatre located at 2124 Broadway
Tickets are available online at www.BeaconTheatre.com or by calling  (866) 858-0008

Bronx
Thursday, Oct. 11, 2012
Lehman Concert Hall located at 250 Bedford Park Boulevard West
Tickets are available online at www.LehmanCenter.org or by calling (718) 960-8833

Queens (Flushing)
Thursday, Oct. 18, 2012
The Colden Auditorium at Queens College located at 65-30 Kissena Blvd.
Tickets are available online at www.KupferbergCenter.org or by calling (718) 793-8080

Staten Island
Thursday, Nov. 1, 2012
The St. George Theatre located at 35 Hyatt Street
Tickets are available online at www.TicketMaster.com or by calling (718) 442-2900

Brooklyn
Thursday, Nov. 8, 2012
The Walt Whitman Theatre at Brooklyn College located at 2900 Campus Road
Tickets are available online at www.BrooklynCenter.com or by calling (718) 951-4500

Queens College cuts ribbon on four renovated arts venues


| mchan@queenscourier.com

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A ribbon-cutting ceremony at Queens College marked the completion of renovations to the campus’ four arts venues and the start of a “renaissance” throughout the borough, said the school’s top official.

“Today is a landmark for our arts center,” said Queens College President Dr. James Muyskens. “There is no other way to describe Queens College’s vision of the future than to call it the Queens renaissance. Our aspirations are that high, our commitment is that fierce, and the impact we can have is great.”

Four arts venues within the Selma and Max Kupferberg Center for the Visual and Performing Arts — the Godwin-Ternbach Museum, Music Building, Goldstein Theatre, and Colden Auditorium — were officially reopened on June 11 after two years of interior and exterior renovations.

Renovations included redesigns and enhancements to the interior lobbies and facades, along with new landscaping and signage, and updated technical, HVAC and security systems.

“We believe that as part of this renaissance in Queens, we must expand our programs into the communities where our students and their families live and work. We can brighten so many lives by streaming live concerts and performances into schools, libraries and nursing homes by providing workshops, seminars and presentations off campus and so much more,” Muyskens said.

Officials at the institution also paid thanks to Max and Selma Kupferberg, the two benefactors who donated $10 million to the college in 2006 to support the arts.

“The borough of Queens is on the brink of perhaps the most exciting time in its history,” Muyskens said. “We are standing on the shoulders of a giant, and in this case those shoulders belong to Max Kupferberg.”