Tag Archives: climate change

Queens’ Morning Roundup


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

morning roundup

TODAY’S FORECAST

Wednesday: Sunshine and a few clouds. High 67. Winds WNW at 10 to 15 mph. Wednesday night: Cloudy skies early, then off and on rain showers overnight. Low 52. Winds S at 10 to 15 mph. Chance of rain 40%.

EVENT OF THE DAY: Citizens’ Climate Lobby

The Queens-Nassau chapter of Citizens’ Climate Lobby will hold its monthly meeting at 6: 30 p.m. at Panera Bread in the Bay Terrace Shopping Center. Join us and help create the political will for a stable climate. Click here for more info or to submit an event of your own

Knockdown center denied liquor license

The Knockdown Center took a straight right to the chin courtesy of the State Liquor Authority (SLA). The SLA denied the Maspeth arts center’s license application at a full board hearing Tuesday. Read more: The Queens Courier

After hour-long debate, New York Senate passes bill to make yogurt state snack

The New York senate passed a bill that would make yogurt the state’s official snack, but not without a surprisingly spirited debate Tuesday evening. Read more: NBC New York

Pedestrian fatalities in city decreased by one-third during first four months of 2014

The number of pedestrians hit and killed by cars dropped by a third in the first four months of 2014, data obtained by the Daily News show. Read more: New York Daily News

Federal report: climate change is upon us

Climate change is a very real problem, according to a new federal report called the National Climate Assessment. Read more: CBS New York/AP

Unidentified 9/11 remains to be moved back to Ground Zero

The unidentified remains of those killed at the World Trade Center on Sept. 11 are set to be moved to a repository at ground zero this weekend, renewing a more than decade-long debate among grieving family members about the best final resting place for their loved ones. Read more: AP

 

Bloomberg presents plan to protect city against climate change


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

NYC Mayor's Flickr/Photo by Spencer T Tucker

Sandy not only showed New York’s City vulnerability to powerful storms; the superstorm also highlighted the future impact climate change could have.

Mayor Michael Bloomberg released the results of a 430-page report on Tuesday examining that very issue. The report contains 250 recommendations on how the city can further protect its neighborhoods and infrastructure against climate events.

“We’ve done a lot to attack the causes of climate change and make our city less vulnerable to its possible effects,” Bloomberg said during his announcement of the report, entitled “A Stronger, More Resilient New York.”

“But Sandy – which tragically took the lives of 43 New Yorkers — made it all too clear that, no matter how far we’ve come, we still face real, immediate threats,” he continued.

The report assesses weather-related threats such as hurricanes, droughts, heavy downpours and heat waves as well as rising sea levels that could result from climate change.

To mitigate the damage from such phenomena, the report makes recommendations for coastal protections. Several are specific to Queens.

Proposals for the borough include studying future surge barriers for Jamaica Bay, installing a dune system on the Rockaway Peninsula, setting up a storm surge barrier at Newtown Creek with gates and connecting levees and installing and raising bulkheads to protect the shoreline in south Queens.

The report also makes recommendations on flood resistant measures for buildings. Those include $1.2 billion in loans or grants for owners to reinforce their structures.

Further, the report calls for reducing flood insurance rates for homeowners through methods other than elevating people’s homes, and for creating more insurance price options.

Beyond flooding, the report looks at ways to strengthen the city’s healthcare system. Methods include making sure facilities are prepared to handle patients’ needs as well as power, telecommunications and other critical systems during disasters.

To read the full report, click here.

 

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Queens’ Morning Roundup


| ctumola@queenscourier.com


TODAY’S FORECAST

Tuesday: Overcast with a chance of a thunderstorm and a chance of rain, then a chance of a thunderstorm and rain showers in the afternoon. High of 79. Breezy. Winds from the SW at 10 to 20 mph. Chance of rain 60%. Tuesday night: Partly cloudy with a chance of rain. Low of 64. Winds from the WNW at 10 to 15 mph. Chance of rain 50%.

EVENT OF THE DAY: A Mouse in the City: A Puppet Musical of ‘Ginormouse’ Proportions

Starting at 4 p.m. children ages 3-13 years old can enjoy a performance of “A Mouse in the City: A Puppet Musical of ‘Ginormouse’ Proportions.” The show follows the tale of a mouse on his journey to the big city. Taking place at the Flushing Library at 41-17 Main Street. Click here for more info or to submit an event of your own

Father and son attacked by pit bull mix

A father and son were viciously attacked by a pit bull mix in Queens. Read more: ABC New York

Huntley: I’m still AG Schneiderman’s target even though I’m prison-bound

Former state Sen. Shirley Huntley may be headed to federal prison, but she claims state Attorney General Eric Schneiderman isn’t through with her yet. Read more: New York Daily News 

New York City soda ban appeal heads to court Tuesday

The next step in the not-so-sweet battle over New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s war against obesity moves to a state appellate court Tuesday. Read more: AP

Sleeping guards at JFK raise major red flags about security

Protecting some of the world’s most strategically important sites in the New York area – including the airports, bridges and the new World Trade Center and memorial site – is a matter of vital concern and large sums of money. Read more: CBS New York

Scientists warn of larger flood zone, extreme heat for NYC

The projections paint an unsettling picture of New York’s future: A city where by the 2050s, 800,000 people could be living in a flood zone that would cover a quarter of the land, and there are as many 90-degree days as is now normal for Birmingham, Ala. Read more: AP

Federal government to comply with order allowing morning after pill for all ages

The federal government on Monday told a judge in Brooklyn that it will reverse course, and take steps to comply with his order to allow girls of any age to buy emergency contraception without prescriptions. Read more: CBS New York/AP

Queens’ Morning Roundup


| ctumola@queenscourier.com


TODAY’S FORECAST

Wednesday: Partly cloudy. High of 48. Winds from the SSW at 5 to 15 mph. Wednesday Night: Clear. Low of 36. Winds from the West at 10 to 15 mph.

EVENT OF THE DAY: Indians in the Caribbean

A photographic exhibition of arts, culture and nation building (1900-1950) at the Rajkumari Cultural Center in Richmond Hill, Indians in the Caribbean shows the life of arts and culture, scholarship and commerce, politics and civics in countries like Guyana, Suriname and Caribbean Islands like Trinidad and Tobago and Jamaica. Click here for more info or to submit an event of your own

Rockaway beaches to open Memorial Day weekend: officials
Residents in the Sandy-ravaged Rockaways packed into a community board meeting Tuesday night to discuss the future of their wrecked boardwalk. Read more: NBC New York

Park advocates slam U.S. Tennis Association expansion plan

Park advocates aren’t showing much love to a plan for a $500 million expansion of a premiere tennis center in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park. Read more: New York Daily News

Cuomo to press for wider curbs on gun access

Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo, pushing New York to become the first state to enact major new gun laws in the wake of the massacre in Newtown, Conn., plans on Wednesday to propose one of the country’s most restrictive bans on assault weapons. Read more: New York Times 

Quinn brushes off report that Bloomberg is eyeing other mayoral candidates

For some time now, it was unquestioned that New York City Council Speaker and mayoral hopeful Christine Quinn would have the backing of Mayor Michael Bloomberg. But that’s not a sure thing, according to a report. Read more: CBS New York 

More anti-Muslim ads go up in NYC subways

The group that equated Muslim radicals with savages in advertisements last year has put up another set of provocative ads in dozens of New York City subway stations. Read more: Wall Street Journal 

Brooklyn Nets player questioned in Philly sex assault claim

Philadelphia police are investigating reports of a sexual assault that may have involved a Brooklyn Nets team member. Read more: NY1 

2012 was hottest year on record in U.S., climate agency says

The year 2012 was the warmest on record for the contiguous United States, beating the previous record by a full degree in temperature, a government climate agency said on Tuesday. Read more: Reuters

Bloomberg endorses Obama for president


| brennison@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of the mayor's office

On the heels of the worst storm in the city’s history, Mayor Michael Bloomberg announced his endorsement of Barack Obama for president citing his leadership in climate change and potential to bridge both parties.

Bloomberg said Hurricane Sandy “brought the stakes of Tuesday’s presidential election into sharp relief,”  in an op-ed for Bloomberg View and re-published on his website.

“Our climate is changing. And while the increase in extreme weather we have experienced in New York City and around the world may or may not be the result of it, the risk that it might be – given this week’s devastation – should compel all elected leaders to take immediate action,” he wrote.

“One sees climate change as an urgent problem that threatens our planet; one does not. I want our president to place scientific evidence and risk management above electoral politics.”

Bloomberg cited New York’s PlaNYC, which has cut the city’s carbon footprint by 16 percent in the last five years, and C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group as examples of local governments making progress where the federal government has not.

The mayor said that as governor of Massachusetts, Mitt Romney had “a history of tackling climate change,” but has since reversed course.

“I believe Mitt Romney is a good and decent man, and he would bring valuable business experience to the Oval Office. He understands that America was built on the promise of equal opportunity, not equal results. In the past he has also taken sensible positions on immigration, illegal guns, abortion rights and health care. But he has reversed course on all of them, and is even running against the health-care model he signed into law in Massachusetts,” said Bloomberg, a Democrat turned Republican turned Independent.

He said he has found the past four years disappointing and that if the 1994 or 2003 version of Mitt Romney ran, he would have received his vote.

Despite his disappointment, Bloomberg said Obama achieved several victories including, Race to the Top, his health care law and women’s rights.

“When I step into the voting booth, I think about the world I want to leave my two daughters, and the values that are required to guide us there. The two parties’ nominees for president offer different visions of where they want to lead America,” Bloomberg said.

The mayor said that the Obama that ran in 2008  as a “pragmatic problem-solver and consensus-builder” devoted little time to developing and sustaining a coalition of centrists as president.

“Presidents Bill Clinton and Ronald Reagan both found success while their parties were out of power in Congress — and President Obama can, too,” said Bloomberg. “If he listens to people on both sides of the aisle, and builds the trust of moderates, he can fulfill the hope he inspired four years ago and lead our country toward a better future for my children and yours.”

 

 

City council concerned over climate changes


| mchan@queenscourier.com

Photo Courtesy of Councilmember James Gennaro

The City Council unanimously voted last week to pass a bill which would allow a task force to address rising sea levels and a recent increase in high-intensity rain storms throughout the five boroughs.

These long and short term problems stemming from climate change would be tackled by a panel of mayor-appointed climate impact scientists, according to Councilmember James Gennaro, who heads the Council’s Environmental Protection Committee.

“What we’re seeing more of now, more so than sea level rise, is the catastrophic impacts of these very high-intensity and frequent rain storms. We’re getting lots of intense weather events that are associated with the gradual warming of the atmosphere,” Gennaro said. “We’re seeing very intense rain storms on a frequency that we haven’t seen before.”

The task force was first created in 2008, under legislation penned by Gennaro, to help the city plan for wilder storms and higher oceans expected in the coming decades. By dealing with greenhouse gases, Gennaro said the bill first sought to reduce the severity of climate change. But this year’s “landmark” legislation, the councilmember said, is all about trying to adapt to it instead.

“Climate change is happening nonetheless,” he said. “We don’t control the fate of the climate around the world by reducing our own greenhouse gas. We’ll still be getting the effects.”

Gennaro said the panel — made up of private entities and representatives of city, state and federal agencies — would be called upon to bring “all of the best scientists together” to figure out the potential impacts of climate change in the city and develop protective policies around them.

Members of the task force, which will make recommendations no less than once every three years, will also brainstorm on infrastructure remedies, including the use of storm surge barriers, and improvements to the city’s sewer system, to make sure coastal parts of the city do not get flooded.

“Common sense policies,” Gennaro said, like where to develop complex buildings in the city away from future sea level complications, will also be considered by the panel.

“Last month was the hottest ever on record, and it’s only one example of the extreme weather New York City has experienced in recent years,” said Council Speaker Christine Quinn. “If this isn’t a call to action, I don’t know what is. We must act decisively now to address severe climate trends or we’re going to face tougher decisions down the road.”