Tag Archives: City University of New York

Immigration hotline offers free, confidential information


| editorial@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of New York Daily News

Thousands of people will be able to receive free, confidential citizenship and immigration information this week thanks to the New York Daily News and City University of New York’s 12th Annual Citizenship NOW! hotline.

Running from Monday,April 28, through Friday, May 2, between 9 a.m. and 7 p.m., the hotline has more than 400 trained volunteers who can answer questions in English and Spanish as well as many other languages, such as Mandarin, Cantonese, Korean, Russian, Bengali, Haitian Creole, French, Italian, Polish, Yiddish and Arabic.

In partnership with Univision and WABC-TV, the weeklong event includes on-air promotional announcements, live coverage and special news segments.

The largest program of its kind in the country, Citizenship NOW! was launched in April 2004 to address the lack of access to information about immigration.

Since its inception, nearly 124,000 callers have sought information from the call-in.

The Citizenship NOW! hotline is led by attorney Allan Wernick, who is also a professor of Law at Baruch College and writes the twice-weekly “Immigration” column for the Daily News. Additionally, Wernick writes the nationally syndicated column, “Immigration and Citizenship” and is the director of the CUNY Citizenship Now! project.

“With immigration reform stalled in Congress, the Daily News/CUNY Citizenship NOW! call-in is of special importance this year,” Wernick said. “Volunteers will provide callers with information on how immigrants can qualify for legal status and U.S. citizenship under existing laws. Immigrants can’t wait for Congress, they need help now.”

To reach the hotline, call 646- 746-9636 for English,646-746-9634 for Spanish and 212-221-2419 for the TTY number.

 

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Holocaust survivor shares experiences through art


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Angy Altamirano

As visitors walk through the Queensborough Community College (QCC) Art Gallery, they are taken through the experiences of Rosemarie Koczÿ, who at three years old had her life turned upside down.

Koczÿ was born in 1939 in Recklinghausen, Germany and three years later was taken to a concentration camp together with her family. At a young age, Koczÿ witnessed death, loss and the struggle to survive.

Years later, still having the hardships she shared with many others strong in her mind and making it as a survivor of the Holocaust, Koczÿ began keeping records of the memories through different methods of artwork. The artist began with creating tapestries then moved to drawings, paintings and sculptures. Koczÿ died in 2007. Since September, QCC has had close to 140 pieces of Koczÿ’s art, created over nearly 30 years, on display in an exhibit titled “Art As A Witness” at the campus’ historic Oakland Building.

The series of close to 100 drawings, done with ink on paper, involved in the exhibit are called “I Weave You A Shroud.” Koczÿ used each of the drawings to remember those she saw suffer and die while in the concentration camps.

“They are burials I offer to those I saw die in the camps where I was deported…” Koczÿ wrote in an initial description of her series. “In the Jewish burials the dead are washed; a woman washes the body of a dead woman, a man washes the body of a dead man. The body is then wrapped in a shroud. Sewing a shroud is an act of respect and a rite.”

The exhibit also features wood sculptures and paintings titled “Standing Man,” where Koczÿ honors an unknown prisoner who ultimately gave his life to help and protect her in the camp.

Some of the pieces are owned by the QCC Art Gallery of the City University of New York, other paintings are loaned by the Stichting Collectie de Stadshof in The Netherlands, drawings from the Musée Création Franche in France and sculptures are from private collectors.

One of Koczÿ’s sculptures is permanently on display at QCC’s Kupferberg Holocaust Resource Center and Archives, while another piece, a tapestry made in 1975, is hung above the main desk in the admissions office.

QCC is located at 222-05 56th Avenue in Bayside and “Art As A Witness” is free to the public and will be up until Sunday, January 5.

The QCC Art Gallery is closed Monday and opened Tuesday and Friday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Wednesday and Thursday 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., and weekends noon to 5 p.m.

 

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First city ROTC program in decades comes to York College


| mhayes@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Jerry Speier

New cadets are being trained for a future serving the country right at York College, in the first city ROTC program in decades.

Last September, the CUNY school took on an ROTC program for young, hopeful cadets.

“I’ve wanted to be an officer all my life,” said junior Jerome Tabaosares. “I wanted to go to school close to home, and as soon as I found out [York] offered ROTC, I jumped right in.”

York’s ROTC program is the first offered at any CUNY college since 1960, and includes a three-credit course comprised of Military Science 101, 102 and 202, as well as Military Custom and Courtesies, Army Ethos and more. An appreciation breakfast was held on Wednesday, January 17 in honor of the growing program; the

York cadets, faculty and also Army members were in attendance.

Tabaosares, a first generation New York native, comes from a long line of Filipino marines and knew that he wanted to follow in the footsteps of those before him. A nursing major, he intends on taking his ROTC experience and continuing on to the Nursing Corp of the Army, hopefully as a Nursing General.

“I’d like to add [something] new to our family,” he said. “If my relatives can do it, so can I.”

Colonel Twala Mathis, U.S. Army Cadet Commander and Second Brigade Commander, addressed the young cadets, commending them for their participation in ROTC.

“This is the absolute best leadership training in the nation,” she said. “Today’s service members are part of a unique team, working together for a single purpose.”

During what Mathis called “one of the most turbulent times in our nation’s history,” she said it was young cadets like those at York that will continue to ensure the safety of our country.

“ROTC is about developing strong leadership skills for life,” said Marcia Keizs, president of York College. “With this preparation, our participating students are enhancing their abilities as leaders.”

 

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Queens’ Morning Roundup


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

TODAY’S FORECAST

Wednesday: Clear. High of 82. Winds from the West at 10 to 15 mph shifting to the NNW in the afternoon.Wednesday night: Partly cloudy in the evening, then clear. Low of 64. Winds from the NW at 5 to 10 mph

EVENT of the DAY: Michael Jackson Birthday Bash 

“Do you Remember the Time” when you first saw the King of Pop’s slick moves literally glide across the dance floor? Do you remember singing the lyrics to “Billie Jean” at the top of your lungs? Or maybe, you laid in bed at night visualizing all the moves in the “Thriller” video. Either way, the music lives. On August 29, it is officially Michael Jackson Day at Resorts World Casino New York City. With MJX, the premier MJ Impersonator, and DJ Spinna on the ones and twos, it will be a night to remember.Click here for more info or to submit an event of your own

Dumping stops in Queens neighborhood

The work to restore this stretch of land along the Van Wyck Expressway is finally underway. It’s a welcoming sight for residents near 116th Avenue who remember what the area used to look like. Read more: NY1

Chain ladder breaks as kin flee fire

A Queens family desperately trying to escape a raging fire tearing through their home tried to use a chain-link ladder to escape — but it suddenly broke, forcing the five people to jump two stories Read more: New York Post 

Suspect charged with killing homeless man in Woodside

Police have arrested and charged Ramiro Martinez with the stabbing death of Enrique Morales Martinez on a street corner in Woodside, Queens on Sunday afternoon. Read more: NY1

CUNY considers constructing a Queens hotel

The City University of New York has retained Cushman & Wakefield Inc. to help the school determine if it should proceed with a plan to build a hotel in Long Island City, Queens, in order to expand its hospitality program. Read more: Crain’s New York

Isaac makes second landfall, levee overtopped in Plaquemines Parish

The center of Hurricane Isaac made a second landfall over Port Fourchon, La., early Wednesday, overtopping a levee southeast of New Orleans, knocking down trees and cutting power to more than 400,000 homes. Read more: ABC News

Republican convention is in full-throated roar

The Republican National Convention is finally in full-throated roar, cheering presidential nominee Mitt Romney’s name at every turn in a long-sought show of unity and mocking the man he is out to defeat in November. Read more: AP

Venus Williams an easy winner in return to the U.S. Open, beats fellow American Bethanie Mattek-Sands, 6-3, 6-1

Bethanie Mattek-Sands, the American wearing a black cap over blue hair, blitzed compatriot Venus Williams early in their first-round match Tuesday, taking the first two games of the opening set. Read more: New York Daily News

 

Power must be wielded wisely


| editorial@queenscourier.com

In light of the current Congressional impasse over federal government subsidies of student loan interest rates, it would seem to be a prophetic fulfillment of the statement that “they have held students hostage with tens of thousands of dollars of debt on education, which is itself a human right” (Occupy Wall Street Declaration, NYC General Assembly, September 29, 2011, “New Politics,” XIII (4), Winter 2012, p.9).

Graduate students pursuing degrees due to the scarcity of employment for college graduates are now no longer able to receive federal subsidy for interest on direct loans; only unsubsidized loans are available. Interest rates, if determined by market forces of “corporations, which place profit over people, self-interest over justice, and oppression over equality” (ibid), may double.

St. Thomas Aquinas, the Angelic Doctor of the Roman Catholic Church, morally condemned all forms of loan interest: “To take usury for money lent is unjust in itself, because this is to sell what does not exist, and this evidently leads to inequality which is contrary to justice” (“Summa Theologica,” Pt. II, II Q. 78, Art. 1).

The City University of New York, founded as City College, implemented free education for all students at one point, yet now charges tuition and fees which are financially burdensome for working and middle-class students. If the bill is not paid on time, the Registrar at Queens College, for example, in a stroke of arrogance, cancels the student’s registration.

The Communist Manifesto (Karl Marx & Frederick Engels, 1848) is correct public policy: “Free education for all children in public schools” (No. 10).

Occupy Wall Street is ideologically correct that America is a corporatist political economy, with corporations wielding political power not by the people, of the people, and for the people. OWS, a nascent counter-hegemonic movement, although thoroughly dialectical in ideology to this Fascist order, needs organization as a Social Democratic political party independent of Republicans and Democrats in order to effectively achieve adaptive social and economic reforms within the American corporative hegemony.

Contrary to Leninist focus, socialist revolutions are not inevitable historical processes since, according to the Italian Communist Party founder Antonio Gramsci, the function of the dominant hegemony naturally adapts and incorporates alternative ideologies.

But the Chinese “Tao Te Ching” said, “the right means in the wrong hands become the wrong means.”

OWS appears to be the wrong hands.

Joseph N. Manago
Briarwood