Tag Archives: Christ the King High School

‘Model’ kid turned her cancer into her cause


| tcimino@queenscourier.com

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Soon you’ll be seeing a lot more of Carly Rose Nieves.

The 16 year old from Middle Village, who her mom calls “not your typical teenager” will soon be emblazoned on the fleet of 75 vehicles for the New York Blood Center (NYBC).

Part of the NYBC’s “rebranding campaign,” Nieves, a freshman at Christ the King High School (CTK), was one of eight from the greater New York area who sat for a photo shoot on March 31.

“It was fun, they were such nice people,” said the teen, who admitted she was “a little bit nervous at first.”

What sets Nieves apart, said her mom, is her heart.

Battling Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) — a cancer of the white blood cells that normally fight infections — since she was seven, Nieves received blood transfusions and underwent two years of intensive chemotherapy. Then, at age 12, she suffered a relapse of ALL. The relapse placed her in the high-risk category, which required additional intensive, high-dose chemotherapy.

Now Nieves — who regrew a full head of hair following the chemo — has been out of treatment for a little over a year and is in remission.

Her focus is school — she plans to pursue American Sign Language in college, since it’s her favorite subject — and helping others, as it has always been.

“She’s living and loving life,” said mom Lisa Cangialosi-Horner. “She is so selfless, she’s just amazing.”

While Nieves was fighting her own battle, she was also working to help the friends she made in the hospital, others who are ill — and to spread awareness about how important and easy it is to register and donate blood.

“I feel like I’ve always wanted to help,” said Nieves. “But after relapsing you look at things differently, It’s sad that there are kids suffering and spending half their lives in the hospital.”

To that end, the family has organized numerous blood drives at CTK and has raised thousands for Friends of Karen — an organization that supports critically-ill children and their families.

“She helped us regain entry to Christ the King,” said Harvey Schaffler, executive director of donor marketing for NYBC. “Now we have blood drives there twice a year.”

“I’m very proud of Carly, she’s an amazingly strong young woman,” said Cangialosi-Horner. “She thinks of others before herself, and she’s always thinking and praying for her friends in the hospital.”

Schaffler explained that the new campaign has received “enormously positive feedback” so far because “what really resonates for donors is envisioning the people they help.”

So Nieves’ image, along with the others featured — set to roll out by the summer — will not only draw attention to her own fight, but to that of those still in need of help.

For Nieves, who turned her cancer into her cause, seeing herself on a moving vehicle may be a little daunting at first.

“I may feel like a celebrity, but I’ll still probaly be in shock,” she admitted.

For more information about becoming a marrow donor, call 1-800-MARROW-2. It’s a simple process that takes just a few minutes of paperwork and a cheek swab.

To learn more about Friends of Karen, which will be hosting a gala fundraiser on August 2 at the Inn at New Hyde Park, go to www.friendsofkaren.org.

A mission born from a cause


| mchan@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photos by Mike DiBartolomeo

Fifteen-year-old Carly Rose Nieves is turning ordinary people into heroes, one pint of blood at a time.

For the second year in a row, the Middle Village teen — and her team of family members and friends — organized a blood drive and bone marrow registry at Christ the King (CTK) Regional High School.

The December 17 event brought in 75 pints of blood and 10 new bone marrow donors for the New York Blood Center.

“The lowest time for blood supply is the winter and holiday season,” mom Lisa Horner said.

Although this year’s drive brought in fewer pints than the previous year, Team Carly kept their heads up.

“I was kind of disappointed,” Lisa said. “But if we didn’t have the blood drive, there would have been 75 fewer pints.”

Last year, they collected 200 pints of blood, registered 54 people to be bone marrow donors and raised $3,000 for Friends of Karen — an organization that supports critically ill children and their families.

“I’m happy we got what we did,” said Lisa. “We were really expecting what we had last year, but it’s okay. I just wish it was more. I’m trying not to let it get me down.”

Carly has been battling Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) — a cancer of the white blood cells that normally fight infections — since she was seven.

She received blood transfusions and underwent two years of intensive chemotherapy. Then, at age 12, she suffered a relapse of ALL after three years. The relapse placed Carly in the high-risk category, which requires additional intensive, high-dose chemotherapy.

Now, Carly — who regrew a full head of hair following the chemo — is out of treatment and in remission. And after being out of school for three years, Carly is back as a freshman at CTK and she is “loving every minute of it.”

But she has not forgotten her mission — or the friends she has made in the hospital who are still suffering.

“Carly was just wondering where everybody was,” Lisa said of the lower turnout. “I was trying to be positive about it and just make her understand it’s more than what we had to start off with.”

Just like the resilient spirit of their soon to be 16-year-old daughter, Lisa and her family will keep pushing through with more blood drives and bone marrow registries.

“It’s a good thing and people don’t have to be afraid of it,” said Lisa. “I’ll just keep getting the word out.”

For more information about becoming a marrow donor, call 1-800-MARROW-2. It’s a simple process that takes just a few minutes of paperwork and a cheek swab. And to learn more about donating blood or organizing a blood drive, email lhorner67@gmail.com.

Queens Veterans Day Parade honors those who served


| rcasiano@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photos by Mike DiBartolomeo. The third annual Queens Veterans Day Parade drew 800 local veterans and their supporters to Middle Village this past weekend.

The third annual Queens Veterans Day Parade drew 800 local veterans and their supporters to Middle Village this past weekend to honor those who served in the Vietnam War.

Veterans from the Vietnam Veterans of America, Queens Chapter 32 and the North Shore Marine Corps League were joined by several community leaders and organizations on Sunday, November 6 for a parade and ceremony at Christ the King High School.

During the only Veterans Day parade in Queens, the community cheered on their Vietnam War vets, some of whom recall the criticism at home for serving in the then very unpopular war.

“It was great to be appreciated, but look how long it took,” said Pastor Toro, Jr., of Ridgewood, who was honored as one of the Grand Marshalls and is the president of the Vietnam Veterans of America, Queens Chapter 32. “I am standing up here for all the Vietnam War veterans. We have their backs.”

The ceremony capped the afternoon parade that had various groups march 10 blocks from Metropolitan Avenue and 79th Place to the high school.

School groups such as the Sunnyside Drum Corp. and the Sacred Heart Twirlers and many more supporters joined the Queens veteran groups as they marched. Councilmembers Elizabeth Crowley and Peter Vallone Jr. were also on hand to salute the veterans at the parade.

David Hills, a Marine from Forest Hills, stood on the sidelines with his wife, cheering on the classic cars, bag pipe music and his comrades who marched in the parade.

“It’s the biggest parade I’ve ever seen. It’s very nice,” said Hills, who is a member of the North Shore Marine Corps. As he watched, a committee member thanked him for his service with a handshake.

“It’s terrific,” he said of the acknowledgment. “We really appreciate it when they say that.”

The annual Queens Veterans Day Parade started three years ago out of a need from the community to salute their troops closer to home.

The parade was sponsored by the Catholic War Veterans Post 1172, Middle Village Chamber of Commerce and the Middle Village Property Owners and Residents Association.