Tag Archives: Charity

Glendale food pantry runs out of food


| ejankiewicz@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Eric Jankiewicz


The cupboard is bare at a Glendale food pantry.

The Sacred Heart Roman Catholic Church is all out of food for Glendale’s needy, and the two women who run the pantry are asking residents to donate what they can.

“Everyday we hope people will come bring us food,” said Nancy Baer,  who along with Sister Margaret Raibaldi, runs the food pantry Monday through Thursday out of the church’s basement.

“This pantry has evolved over the years but our goal has always been to help the hungry,” Raibaldi said. “We never let people leave here hungry.”

While the church’s food stock often goes through low and high cycles, Baer and Sister Raibaldi said that this week’s low is worrying for them. They serve more than 100 families every week and a large group of single men, all of whom are from Glendale.

“We offer them what we can,” said Sister Raibaldi, but for this week what they have in store is a few pounds of whole wheat pasta and some canned vegetables that won’t make enough for one family meal.

The Catholic organization Knights of Columbus provides the Glendale pantry with hundreds of pounds of food during major holidays like Christmas and Thanksgiving but for the rest of the year, the pantry depends on donations from the community and the nearby St. Pancras Church in Ridgewood.

Among the crowd favorites are macaroni and cheese and tuna.

“And we definitely wouldn’t turn away a chicken,” Baer said.

Anyone who wishes to donate can call (718) 821-3285.

 

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Give back this holiday season


| Brandpoint@queenscourier.com

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The holidays are known for eliciting cheer, thanks and a sense of community as families come together to share some of their most treasured traditions, whether that’s gathering for a special meal, organizing an activity or finding a way to give back to those less fortunate. Last year, Americans gave $316 billion to charity according to Giving USA, but it’s not just financial donations needed. Many organizations depend on donations of time and kindness to get by.

No matter what you choose to donate, giving back feels good. Consider all the different ways you can expand your charitable giving this holiday season:

Make a financial donation as a gift

Consider making a donation to a charity of choice in the name of the person who has everything. Many organizations will provide you with a thank-you card recognizing the donation, which you can then put under the tree for the holiday celebration.

Choose gifts that give back

The holidays are a time when many companies make donations to charities. One such company is Hickory Farms, which will donate $5 to Share Our Strength’s No Kid Hungry campaign for every Party Planner Gift Box sold this holiday season, up to $500,000. This delicious gift box includes Summer Sausage, smooth and creamy cheeses, fresh nuts and crunchy snack mix.

“We are honored to be supported by Hickory Farms again this season. These kinds of partnerships enable us to scale and sustain our efforts to feed more children,” says Billy Shore, founder and CEO of Share Our Strength. “Just $5 can help a child in need receive up to 50 meals. Every donation makes a huge difference.”

Organize a drive

Food banks and clothing charities often struggle with providing enough sustainable food and warm clothing for those in need during the winter months. Have your family and friends ask coworkers and neighbors about donating to your local food bank or clothing charity. Send an announcement via email or post signs on doors a week in advance of your drive. This gives people a chance to collect additional items to be donated.

The holiday season is a time with endless opportunities to give back, whether it’s to an organization you’ve long been affiliated with or to a new cause that you’re just learning about. Giving back to others will help enhance all the emotions and warm feelings the holiday season is meant to bring.

Courtesy BPT

 

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Help make history: Vote for Queens sites to get grant money


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

The Courier/Photos

Five lucky historic Queens venues are in the running to win part of a $3 million grant to support their services and assist in their revitalization.

Through a partnership with American Express, the National Trust for Historic Preservation brought the Partners in Preservation initiative to New York City, which is a plan aimed at providing financial support to protect landmarks and significant sites across the nation.

The Queens sites that made the cut are the Louis Armstrong House Museum, the Queens County Farm Museum, Flushing Town Hall’s building, Astoria Park’s Pool and the Rocket Thrower sculpture in Flushing Meadows- Corona Park.

“We think it’s a terrific opportunity for us and we’re having fun with it,” said Betsy Enright, director of external affairs for the Flushing Council on Culture and the Arts, which manages events in Flushing Town Hall. “It’s all really for the people of our community, because we’re trying to make our building beautiful.”

Partners in Preservation has traveled around cities throughout the nation each year since 2006 and has donated $6.5 million to preserve American treasures.
With its first stop in the concrete jungle, the program selected 40 buildings or structures around the five boroughs.
Each of the sites submitted a proposal, including an estimated amount of money they require for their projects, and now depend on votes from residents to determine which sites will be funded.

Residents can vote online once per day until May 21, at partnersinpreservation.com. The four winners that receive the most votes will be awarded their grant requests and a special committee will decide how to divide the remaining money among the other sites, based on need and votes.
Flushing Town Hall asked for $260,000 to restore the large Romanesque windows surrounding the building, while the Louis Armstrong House Museum requested $250,000 to preserve the garden.

For some sites like the Queens County Farm Museum, which requires $255,000 to restore the farmhouse, the contest could give the organization more than just money.
“It would mean a great deal,” said Sarah Meyer, director of sales and marketing at the farm.

According to Meyer the farm was established in 1975 and isn’t as well-known or historic as other sites in the contest and doesn’t have as many financial supporters.
“It’s a grant that’s getting a lot of publicity,” Meyer said, adding, “hopefully, a lot more people will become more aware of the Queens County Farm Museum and visit here and support us.”

 

Click here to cast your vote

Car Show for a Cause


| aaltman@queenscourier.com


The East Coast Car Association, which is famous for its annual Toy Run, in conjunction with Knights of Columbus #569, hosted a car show for Autism on Sunday, April 29 at Flushing’s P.S. 177, the Robin Sue Ward School for Exceptional Children.

With hot rods and classics, as well as face painting, music by “Mike the D.J.,” a flea market, blood drive, raffles, barbecue, and even a 50/50, the day’s events raised $5,700. The FDNY Fire Saftey Unit was also on hand, as was the Flushing Volunteer Ambulance Corps and the a Child ID unit.

To learn more about the East Coast Car Association, which will host the Toy Run on November 18, visit www.eccatoysfortots.org.

St. John’s toy drive teaches life lessons


| amanning@queenscourier.com

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There was a local celebrity trotting around St. John’s University last week – one who has a golden complexion, lots of fur, and four legs.

It was Hooper, the beloved dog of Professor Jane Paley and the face of the annual Hooper’s Toy Drive, which is organized by Paley’s public relations campaign class.

Professor Jane Paley’s class goes above and beyond to practice the art of public relations. In 2008, she started the drive to help provide Christmas toys to inner-city children, while simultaneously teaching her students how to promote and fundraise.

Students are collecting unwrapped toys and monetary donations for the school’s Bread and Life organization, which provides food and a helping hand to the poor. Each group in the class has also picked an additional charity to donate to, one of which is St. Jude’s Children Hospital.

Last year’s campaign class collected 2,500 toys. Hooper’s Toy Troopers, as this year’s class has coined themselves, is hoping to outdo that number. It is this competitive spirit combined with a collective altruistic mindset that makes the drive work so well.

“This year I’m happy to be a part of it, and I’m looking forward to helping surpass last year’s amount,” says Ryen Mills, a senior, who added that there is no greater feeling than to see a child smile just as she and so many of her classmates did during the holiday season.

For more information, visit www.facebook.com/hooperstoydrive. If you would like to donate, visit www.hooperstroopers.weebly.com.