Tag Archives: cb10

Hamilton Beach street in disrepair, ignored by city, locals say


| slicata@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photos by Salvatore Licata

Hamilton Beach residents are furious that smooth streets in nearby Howard Beach are being repaved while, they say, the main artery into their tiny enclave has been ignored for years.

“It’s frustrating to drive into the neighborhood and see perfectly good streets [in Howard Beach] being ripped up,” Roger Gendron, president of the Hamilton Beach Civic Association, said. “104th Street was supposed to be a capital project plan but now we can’t even get it repaved.”

The Department of Transportation (DOT) has been doing street resurfacing projects throughout Howard Beach for about two weeks now but has not made its way over to Hamilton Beach. The neighborhood does not appear on this week’s resurfacing schedule on the DOT website.

DOT doing street resurfacing in New Howard Beach

DOT doing street resurfacing in New Howard Beach

104th Street is littered with potholes, pavement cracks and deteriorating previous repairs. Throughout the day, cars can be seen driving on the wrong side of the road to avoid the rough patch leading to a blind spot for oncoming traffic into the neighborhood.

Moreover, Gendron says the road is responsible for front-end car damage that many residents have experienced. He has filed a claim for his mother’s car which he says has $1,500 worth of front-end damage due to the many times she must travel the road to get into and out of the neighborhood.

“This is something that affects every resident in the neighborhood,” Gendron said. “We’ve been asking for something to be done since 2008.”

In 2010, a representative from the DOT came to a civic meeting in Hamilton Beach and said that 104th Street would be part of its 10-year capital project list with shovels in the ground for a totally new road by 2012, according to Gendron. This has yet to happen.

Betty Braton, chairwoman of Community Board 10, says the road has and will continue to be in the top 10 of the board’s capital budget request list.

“This is a difficult situation for residents of Hamilton Beach because of the nature of the roadway,” Braton said. “The people in Hamilton Beach deserve a street that is properly paved just as all residents of the city deserve a street that is properly paved.”

Gendron said he hopes that one day a capital project will be done for the street but for now would be content with the same project that is being done one neighborhood over.

“At this point all we want is the surface pavement to be re-done,” Gendron said. “Hopefully, that would hold us over until a capital project can actually be put in place.”

The DOT did not immediately respond to calls for comment.

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Traffic fix proposed for Lefferts Blvd.


| tcullen@queenscourier.com

CB 10 10-11w

Slow down, folks.

The Department of Transportation (DOT) is planning to remove a lane of traffic from each side of Lefferts Boulevard between 135th and 149th Avenues.

This one-block stretch of Lefferts has been plagued with traffic problems, including up to 20 accidents, double parking and speeding, said Nichole Altmix, a DOT project manager, at the Thursday, October 4 Community Board 10 meeting. By narrowing this stretch of the pavement to a single lane each way, DOT officials believe drivers will be less inclined to speed, Altmix said. The lanes would not be physically eliminated, Altmix added, but instead painted over with yellow striping.

Although the number of lanes would be halved, Altmix said the single lane can carry close to 500 cars per day without backing up.

“One lane can carry 495 vehicles very easily,” she said.

Parking lanes on either side of Lefferts would be expanded from seven feet to 14 feet as a means to combat double parking. DOT Queens Commissioner Maura McCarthy acknowledged that, while it is illegal to double park and is strongly discouraged, drivers and shoppers will block in other cars and hold up traffic. By doubling the width of the parking lane, inevitable double parkers would not block an entire lane of traffic.

Some community board members who live near, or travel on, this stretch are wary, however, that this proposal will really fix the problem.

Peter Granickas disagreed with the DOT’s current plan, and likened it to the recent changes at the intersection of Rockaway Boulevard and Cross Bay Boulevard.

Other board members suggested alternatives to the striping — as drivers will sometimes use it as a thoroughfare during backed up traffic.

Community Board 10 cannot vote for or against the suggested changes, according to chair Elizabeth Braton. The presentation was to get feedback from residents on what can or cannot work for this project.

Noise tops complaints at Community Board 10


| tcullen@queenscourier.com

Noise complaints and concerns over spraying for the West Nile virus were some of the issues brought up at this month’s Community Board 10 meeting on Thursday, September 6.

From April to August of this year, there were 1,274 residential noise complaints phoned into 3-1-1, data shows, while 136 commercial noise complaints were made. Additionally, two calls were placed for houses of worship; 33 for parks; 86 for street and sidewalk noise; and 91 for vehicles.

Although residents may tire of making the calls for consistent noise makers, board chair Elizabeth Braton said continuing to call 3-1-1 helps track what types of noise complaints there are, and how consistent.

Several board members were also concerned that the Department of Environmental Protection was not properly notifying residents about spraying for West Nile virus. Members were concerned about people with sensitivities to pesticides, and toys left outside by children.

The board also approved an expansion to a medical office that would allow a nuclear stress test machine to be installed and make patient care easier. The structure is owned by Dr. Joseph Musso, a cardiologist who was represented at the meeting by land use lawyer Eric Polatnik.

The building, located at 94-07 156th Street, was zoned for an additional floor in the front of the building, but could not expand to two stories in the back. This can be changed, however, if the structure meets five criteria for an exemption, Polatnik said.

Because the front portion of the building was built on a wood frame, further foundation would be needed in order to prevent the building from shaking — and causing damage to the machine. This would not have to be done if expansion was done to the back building, which had a metal frame, Polatnik said.

Board members were concerned that once this expansion was done, there would be a desire for further expansion to the building. Polatnik assured the board that in order to expand, the owner needed the approval from the Community Board and expansion was at its members’ discretion.