Tag Archives: building

Cleanup set for Ridgewood apartment house site


| agiudice@ridgewoodtimes.com

File photo

Builders planning to erect a seven-story apartment house on a former Ridgewood knitting mill site are set to move forward with an environmental cleanup, according to the state Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC).

The cleanup focuses on 1632-1641 Madison St., formerly Philru Knitting Mills, where Essex Capital plans to develop a 90-unit apartment building. The action is moving forward under the DEC’s Brownfield Cleanup Program. Essex Capital’s holding company, 1614 Madison Partners LLC, will perform the cleanup under DEC oversight.

The cleanup action for the site includes Track 1 cleanup, which would allow unrestricted use of the site. The existing buildings would be demolished and an underground gasoline storage and any associated contaminated soil would be removed.

Additionally, crews will remove two feet of soil from the tetrahloroethylene “hot spot” area beneath the existing building slab on Lot 14 and dispose of it off-site; excavate two feet of soil from the rest of the building footprint beneath the slab of both lots; and collect “endpoint” samples after the initial excavation to evaluate the effectiveness of the cleanup.

If the DEC determines after the initial phase that further action is needed, crews will install a composite cover system consisting of a concrete building slab and/or two feet of soil meeting the soil cleanup objectives; a Site Management Plan for long-term maintenance of the engineering controls; and an Environmental Easement filed against the site to ensure the implementation of the Site Management Plan and allowing the use and development of the controlled property for restricted-residential use.

When the NYSDEC is satisfied with the cleanup process, they will approve a Final Engineering Report and issue a Certificate of Completion. After receiving the Certificate of Completion, 1614 Madison Partners LLC and Essex Capital Partners will be allowed to redevelop the site as they see fit. They would also have no liability to the state for contamination at the site, subject to certain condition, as well as be eligible for tax credits to offset the costs of the cleanup process and redevelopment of the site.

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Woodhaven building will finally be repaired 18 months after collapse


| slicata@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Salvatore Licata

Construction is now going full steam ahead to restore a commercial Woodhaven building that collapsed more than 18 months ago and has since been an eyesore.

The second floor front of the building, located at 78-19 Jamaica Ave., has been fully built back up and work will be “finished before the end of the year,” according to Elio Forcina, the building owner’s lawyer.

“My client is in the process of fixing the structure,” said Forcina. “It should be finished very shortly.”

The commercial building was originally occupied by a furniture store. The roof collapsed in April 2013, and the building has been vacant since. It has been a local eyesore since the collapse and was even close to being demolished in the summer.

But Forcina saved the building from being knocked down by suing the city for “arbitrary and capricious” conduct and settled on repairing it.

He now said once it is rebuilt, the building will bring pride to residents in Woodhaven.

“Once the building is completely renovated, it will be a structure the community is proud of.”

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RKO Keith Theater develops


| smosco@queenscourier.com

RKO

The rebirth of the RKO Keith Theater is more reality than Hollywood fantasy – reports that it will be redeveloped into apartments and shops are based on a true story.

Developer Patrick Thompson purchased the Flushing landmark for $20 million and plans to restore the historic lobby while building a 17-story tower with stores, 357 rental apartments and a community center. Thompson’s spokesperson Michael Nussbaum said that most of the necessary approvals have been obtained and that demolition will most likely begin in the first quarter of 2012.

Nussbaum also said previously published reports stating that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) rejected the project due to its height were misleading. The project is in close proximity to LaGuardia Airport, but Nussbaum believes that the FAA will find that the development does not disrupt flight patterns.

“The previous owner submitted a proposal to the FAA and got their approval. The plans we submitted are the same as the ones they submitted,” said Nussbaum, explaining that the previous owner’s approval from the FAA had expired and that Thompson simply needs to resubmit. “This process was triggered by us because we had to apply for a new approval.”

Nussbaum said that he is confident that Thompson will get the same approval that the previous owner, Shaya Boymelgreen, got in 2003. The FAA did send a letter to Thompson calling the height “hazardous,” but both Nussbaum and a spokesperson from the FAA said doing so is standard operating procedure for any new structure that has not yet been approved.

Thompson has hired an FAA consultant, who will go through the process – and said that it should take anywhere from 30 to 60 days to get an approval.

“The building’s height has not changed one inch and as far as we know LaGuardia’s flight pattern has not changed,” said Nussbaum. “We expect the FAA to come to the same conclusion they did in 2003.”

The project already has approvals from the Board of Standards and Appeals, as well as Community Board 7. Thompson has said that he expects completion of the project in early 2015.