Tag Archives: Brownsville

Three people killed, two injured in Halloween night shootings in Queens, Brooklyn


| ctumola@queenscourier.com


Three people died and two people were injured within a five-hour period during Halloween shootings across Queens and Brooklyn, according to police.

The two non-fatal incidents occurred in the Jamaica and Rockaway Park sections of Queens, said cops.

Around 7 p.m. on 148th Street near 88th Avenue an unidentified suspect exited his vehicle wearing a mask and shot a man in his 20s multiple times, said police. The suspect then fled northbound on 148th Street.

The victim was taken to Jamaica Hospital in critical condition.

An hour later, an 18-year-old man was shot in the right leg at Beach Channel Drive near Beach 141st Street, said police.

He was taken to Jamaica Hospital and is expected to survive.

Cops said there are no arrests at this time in both Queens shooting incidents.

In Brooklyn the violence was deadly, with three men losing their lives, according to police.

Shawn Rhodes, 46, was shot multiple times at the Linden Houses in East New York around 7: 30 p.m.

Three hours later, Anthony Seaberry, 19, was fatally shot in East Flatbush.

Around 11:30 p.m., 37 year-old Kevin Thompson died after he was shot in the neck in the Brownsville section of Brooklyn.

 

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Livery cab driver stabbed to death in Brooklyn


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Graphic image

A man was brutally killed while driving his livery car in Brooklyn Thursday.

The driver, identified as 54-year-old Uro Orji Ama, who has close family ties to Rosedale, was dropping off two passengers near Lott Avenue and Thomas Boyland Street in Brownsville around 5:30 p.m. when one of them allegedly stabbed him with what a witness described as an umbrella, said police.

After the attack, the car reportedly crashed a short distance away and the suspects, a man and a woman, escaped from the scene.

Ama was taken to Brookdale Hospital where he was pronounced dead, said police.

The NYPD is offering a $12,000 reward for any information leading to an arrest and conviction.

Updated Monday, June 17

 

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Nets score keeper reflects on basketball tenure, Bayside ties


| mstumpf@homereporter.com

THE COURIER/Photos by Terence M. Cullen

Herb Teretsky, 67, does not think of himself as a superstar.

He has kept score for the Nets for the past 47 years and plans to work four more years to reach a career benchmark.

The dedicated score keeper has not missed a game since 1984.

He was born and raised in Brownsville, Brooklyn and now lives in Bayside.

“Being a scorekeeper for the Nets is like a box of chocolates. You never know what you’re going to get,” he said, quoting the famous line from “Forrest Gump.”

His career has included many ups and downs along the way. He has traveled the world and formed relationships with superstars like Shaquille O’Neal, Michael Jordan and Julius “Dr. J” Erving.

Teretsky has also racked up points in the literary world, writing about the experiences and acquaintances he has made during his journeys.

In his 2010 book “Basketball and Life,” he wrote about the people who mattered to them going back to when he became involved in basketball at age 21.

“It was a great undertaking and a lot of fun,” Teretsky said of the book. He also wrote 200 poems in a period of two months. He described that publication as “simply private and personal thoughts.”

Teretsky said he tried his best to make readers feel like they are sitting courtside and working with some of the greatest athletes in the world.

“I’m not the player, I’m just there to keep score,” he added.

Teretsky’s career highlights include mentions in numerous halls of fame. But his career has seen its share of tragedy, as when his friend the Croatian professional basketball player Drazen Petrovic died in a car accident at the age 28. Teretsky said the death of Petrovic, who was also Teretsky’s son’s hero, created a “horrible situation for the team.”

During his more than four decades so far with the Nets, Teretsky has been the official scorer for

NBA games in Japan, Mexico City and Canada. He has scored the NBA Hall of Fame’s exhibition game in Springfield, Massachusetts. While building his career as the NBA’s preeminent official scorer, Teretsky also coached touring teams in Israel, Greece, Belgium and France, winning the prestigious Tournoi Internationals in 1984.

“This last year may have been the best year of my career,” Teretsky said.

Teretsky with an autographed basketball to commemorate the Nets’ 1976 American Basketball Association Championship.

 

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NYPD releases stop-and-frisk stats


| aaltman@queenscourier.com

File photo

For the first time, the NYPD has released 2011 data regarding the controversial procedure of stop-and-frisk.

Among those stopped-and-frisked in 2011, 87 percent were either black or Hispanic, according to the report. Of the 685,724 stops made citywide, 53 percent were black while 34 percent were Hispanic. Only 9 percent of those stopped-and-frisked were white, while 4 percent were Asian.

The most common crime suspected was weapons possession, which accounted for 26 percent of all stops.

According to the report, Brooklyn’s 75th Precinct, comprising East New York and Cypress Hills, had the highest number of stops in the city, with more than 31,000, of which 97 percent of which were either black or Hispanic. The 73rd Precinct in Brooklyn, covering Brownsville, was the next highest with 25,167 stops, 98 percent of which involved minorities.

Queens’ 115th Precinct of East Elmhurst, Corona and Jackson Heights ranked third with 18,156 stops. Nearly 93 percent of those stopped were minorities.

The New York Civil Liberties Union (NYCLU), which fought to have stop-and-frisk statistics released last year, claims the system is a form of racial profiling, adding that the practice has not reduced the number of people who fall victim to shootings. In 2002, there were 1,892 victims of gunfire and 97,296 stops. In 2011, there were 1,821 victims of gunfire but a record 685,724 stops.

 

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School aides protest pink slips


| nkarimi@queenscourier.com


As Local 372 members return to their jobs, bureaucrats at the Department of Education (DOE) are pre¬paring pink slips and layoff notices for nearly 800 school aides.

“During the budget negotiations this June, the Chancellor [Dennis Walcott] called Lillian Roberts [DC 37 executive director] to try to work with DC-37 to avert DOE layoffs. Unfortunately, the union would not agree to any real savings that could have saved these jobs, so schools took a larger budget cut than might have otherwise been necessary, and these layoffs are the result,” said Barbara Morgan, Deputy Press Secretary for the DOE.

In order to protest the loss of jobs for school aides, community coordinators, health aides and family workers, Assemblymember William Scarborough, Local 372, teachers, parents, elected officials and labor leaders gathered in Springfield Gardens at P.S. 15 the Jackie Robinson School, on Friday, September 23.

“Schools cannot afford to lose these workers. They formed a support network with them and in order for teachers to teach they need this network,” said Scarborough.

The protest, which drew about 75 people, was a means to give Mayor Michael Bloomberg a message — “Save Our Schools! Save Our Communities.”

“I am deeply concerned about these planned layoffs. These layoffs have threatened the most vulnerable in our city, many of them single mothers with children, and will have a devastating ripple effect on our economy. They must be rolled back,” said Scarborough.

Job losses will be most felt in areas such as East New York, Brownsville, Williamsburg, Washington Heights, and the South Bronx; places that are already in need of enhanced social services and suffer with higher unemployment rates, according to President of Local 372 Santos Crespo.

Over the course of the past three years, unions and schools have lost more than 1,600 school and health aides, according to Crespo.

“I know the city is planning an ongoing effort to save these jobs, but there are other things they can cut back on instead of laying off these members,” said Scarborough.