Tag Archives: breezy point surf club

New photo exhibit shows before and after effects of Sandy


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photos courtesy of NPS

Homes and businesses were not the only places that Sandy destroyed.

Gateway National Recreation Area, which encompasses parts of Queens, Brooklyn, Staten Island and Monmouth County, New Jersey, is also still recovering from the storm and has yet to fully reopen.

The effects that Sandy had on the area can now be seen in a new exhibit, “Hurricane Sandy: Before and After,” at the Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center.

“These [photos] are snapshots in time. It’s the chance to see a historic event,” said Charles Markis, a park ranger and the exhibit’s curator.

As part of the storm recovery effort, the National Park Service (NPS) Incident Management Team went around the area taking photos to assess the storm damage. The team, one of the largest assembled in NPS history, even had access to aircraft for aerial pictures.

After looking through those photographs, and receiving inquiries from the public on what had happened to Gateway after the storm, Markis saw them as more than a remediation tool.

Using those photos, as well as shots from the NPS already had of the area’s condition before Sandy, both from on the ground and satellite imagery, he put together the “Before and After” exhibit.

He describes the 30 photos, some of which are side-by-side comparisons, as sad, yet interesting and beautiful, and has received a similar response from those who have seen it.

“My point was not to celebrate the disaster but to tell the story of what happened,” said Markis.

The photos show scenes of structural destruction at Jacob Riis Park, boats thrown onto land away from Great Kills Harbor and parking lots buried in sand.

The pictures also illustrate resilience through recovery progress maps, and that’s the ultimate message that visitors should take away from the exhibit.

“While these pictures demonstrate damage, the take-away message should not be one of doom and gloom, but rather one of resilience,” said Gateway superintendent Linda Canzanelli. “There is still a lot of work to do and some things have changed forever. But the park is reopening, the natural areas will rebound and park visitors will be welcomed back.”

 

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Queens’ Morning Roundup


| ctumola@queenscourier.com


TODAY’S FORECAST

Monday: Clear in the morning, then overcast. High of 77. Winds from the WNW at 5 to 10 mph shifting to the South in the afternoon. Monday night: Mostly cloudy with a chance of rain after midnight. Low of 68. Winds from the South at 5 to 15 mph. Chance of rain 40%.

EVENT of the DAY: Korean Theatre Festival in New York

The 3rd annual Korean Theatre Festival in New York, presented by Korus Players Co., an international theatre company based in both New York City and Seoul, South Korea, in association with K-R Dreams Inc., kicks off today. Ending September 23, the festival will feature four plays performed at the The Secret Theater in Long Island City. Click here for more info or to submit an event of your own

Repeated flooding in Glendale prompts meeting between lawmaker and DEP

The latest flood devastation in Glendale has left residents with a deluge of anger and the Department of Environmental Protection is taking notice. Read more: New York Daily News

Suspect behind 13 Queens fires is arraigned

A man accused of setting 13 fires across Queens was arraigned Sunday. Thien Dinh, 43, was arraigned this morning following his arrest on Friday on charges of arson, reckless endangerment and burglary. Read more: NY1

Police find loaded gun on man sleeping on the subway

A man sprawled out on a row of seats on a subway in Queens got a rude awakening early Saturday when cops pulled him from the train and found a loaded gun in his bag, police said. Read more: New York Daily News

Search for missing diver in Queens suspended

The Coast Guard has suspended a search for a missing diver who was last seen spear fishing in the waters off New York City. The 29-year-old man went missing at about 7 a.m. Friday near Breezy Point Surf Club in Queens. Read more: ABC New York/AP

MTA is rai$ing havoc

Straphangers could face even larger subway fare hikes than already planned because of a potential $100 million hole in the MTA’s budget. Read more: New York Post

1 year on, Occupy is in disarray; spirit lives on

Occupy Wall Street began to disintegrate in rapid fashion last winter, when the weekly meetings in New York City devolved into a spectacle of fistfights and vicious arguments. Read more: AP

 

Tornado touches down in Queens


| brennison@queenscourier.com

Breezy

More than a breeze spun through Breezy Point last weekend as a tornado touched down, disrupting the oceanside community.

Trees and roofs took the brunt of the damage during the twister that tore through Queens on Saturday, September 1. Several roofs were torn off at the Breezy Point Surf Club.

Nobody was hurt at the club, said General Manager Bob Ordan, and he expects cleanup to last a couple of more weeks.

“We’re lucky the storm hit this weekend and not last weekend,” Councilmember Eric Ulrich said, who surveyed the damage in the area shortly after the storm. “Because last weekend the Surf Club was filled with people.”

Saturday saw a lot of wind shear in the atmosphere, which is the turning of winds and a key ingredient in tornadoes, said National Weather Service (NWS) meteorologist Joey Picca. The moisture and storms in the area combined with the wind shear resulted in the tornado. Winds were estimated at 70 mph, placing it at the lower end of the Enhanced Fujita Scale, which measures the storms.

Joey Mure, 16, just got home from the gym when he saw the tornado across the water near Coney Island.

“I couldn’t believe it,” he said. “It was huge.”

The Breezy Point resident said he could hear a whistle from the storm, but that was soon overtaken by the sounds of sirens.

This is not the first time a tornado has touched down in Queens in recent years. The city has experienced an uptick in these cyclones, though Picca said it is too short of a period to say with certainty that a trend is developing. Between 1950 and 2010, the area was hit with 10 tornadoes.

“We’re much better at observing tornadoes now. So it’s certainly possible that long ago there were one or two that were missed,” he said.

Assemblymember Philip Goldfeder said in the future he hopes warning times for tornadoes can be increased.

“When people started to see [the tornado] was the first time we got the warning,” he said.

The NWS put out a tornado warning at 10:55 a.m., minutes before the wind tunnel landed in Queens.

Picca said weaker twisters are harder to detect ahead of time resulting in warning times of mere minutes.

Mure said he hopes there is not a need for a warning anytime soon.

“I hope I never see one again.”