Tag Archives: Board of Elections

Board of Elections certifies Ulrich victory


| mhayes@queenscourier.com

File photo

Nearly a month after voters cast their ballots, City Councilmember Eric Ulrich has been certified by the Board of Elections (BOE) as the official victor in the race for District 32.

The Republican beat his opponent, District Leader Lew Simon, with 10,488 votes compared to Simon’s 9,080, a difference of 1,408 votes, according to the BOE certification report.

Immediately following the general election on November 5, both candidates declared victory.

However, as more votes rolled in, Ulrich was unofficially named the winner by the BOE and various media outlets.

But Simon did not concede and instead wished to wait until all absentee ballots were counted.

Since Election night, however, Ulrich and his camp believed the number of absentee ballots would not outnumber the difference in votes, and the incumbent’s return to office was ensured.

Simon said despite the outcome, he is “very proud of the race that I ran.”

“I’m still a Democratic leader. I’m very proud to always be there to help the people,” he said.

The close race was reminiscent of the 2009 City Council District 32 Special Election in which Ulrich and Simon faced off against each other. At that time, Simon held on but the councilmember came out on top.

 

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Tudor Village voters granted poll site switch in time for general election


| mhayes@queenscourier.com

The good fight was won, and a poll site switch will give residents an easier travel route straight to the ballots.

Councilmember Eric Ulrich wrote to the Board of Elections (BOE) in September on behalf of Tudor Village voters, whose poll site was switched from P.S. 63 in Ozone Park to P.S. 232 in Lindenwood.

“The Board of Elections should be making it easier, not harder, for people to vote,” Ulrich said.

In order to get to P.S. 232, Tudor Village residents would have to cross the Belt Parkway. Ulrich said this task is “nearly impossible” without a car, and since the change was made, voter turnout from the area had decreased and “residents remain concerned about their ability to make it to the polls in the future.”

Michael Ryan, BOE executive director, responded to Ulrich and said these voters will be assigned to vote at J.H.S. 202 in Ozone Park, just in time for the November general election.

“This change will certainly be more convenient and will enhance the safety of the voters as they will no longer be required to cross a busy thoroughfare to exercise their right to vote,” Ryan said.

J.H.S. 202 is less than a mile from Tudor Village’s initial P.S. 63 poll site.

“I am pleased that the BOE was able to accommodate the residents of Tudor Village. By making it easier for them to exercise their right to vote, we are ensuring that every voice can be heard on Election Day,” Ulrich said.

 

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Councilmember wants poll site switch for Tudor Village voters


| mhayes@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Maggie Hayes

With the general election approaching, one candidate wants any and every voter at the polls.

The Board of Elections (BOE) rezoned Tudor Village voters two years ago from P.S. 63 in Ozone Park to P.S. 232 in Lindenwood. Councilmember Eric Ulrich, who is running for re-election, is requesting the BOE switch it back.

“The Board of Elections should be making it easier, not harder, for people to vote,” Ulrich said.

In order to get to P.S. 232, Tudor Village residents would have to cross the Belt Parkway. Ulrich said this task is “nearly impossible” without a car.

Ulrich said that since the change was made, voter turnout from the area has decreased and “residents remain concerned about their ability to make it to the polls in the future.”

Ulrich is running against Democrat Lew Simon in the November general election and wants the BOE to re-designate P.S. 63 as the Tudor Village voting site “as soon as possible” so residents can vote “without impediment in the upcoming election.”

“Tudor Village residents should be able to vote in their own neighborhood,” he said. “I hope the Board of Elections comes to their senses and reverses this decision before November.”

The BOE said as a result of a decision made by both Queens Commissioners, they have agreed to move forward in making the change and it will possibly in place by the general election.

 

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Mailers direct Whitestone voters to wrong polling sites


| mchan@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Melissa Chan

An apparent mistake by the city’s Board of Elections (BOE) would have had Whitestone residents voting in Forest Hills during the upcoming primary.

About 100 people in Whitestone, College Point, Malba and Beechhurst were sent BOE mailers last week directing them to vote more than six miles away, double the distance of their usual polling place, a local civic leader said.

The 61-20 Grand Central Parkway poll site listed on the notices is on the border between Corona and Forest Hills.

“I’ve been in Whitestone for 27 years. I’ve always voted at P.S. 193. It’s four blocks from my house,” said resident George Mirtsopoulos, 58. “I get this notice saying I’m voting in Forest Hills. I thought it was ridiculous.”

Mirtsopoulos, Malba Gardens Civic president Alfredo Centola and the area’s city councilmember said they alerted the elections board of the blunder.

The BOE first told residents the change was due to recent redistricting and later switched to say it was a “glitch” that sent voters in the 11357 ZIP code to poll sites in the 11375 area, residents said. The two numbers differ only by switching the last two digits.

“You should check and double check,” Mirtsopoulos said. “Somebody should have said, ‘Wait. They live in Whitestone, why are they voting in Forest Hills?’ The bells and whistles should have gone off a little bit.”

The mailer blindsided multiple residents, mostly the elderly, who did not take immediate notice of change in poll site, Mirtsopoulos said.

“A lot of people on my block didn’t even realize it,” he said. “It would have caused a lot of confusion.”

Councilmember Dan Halloran — who awaits trial for bribery but represents the district for the remainder of the year — said his office “was flooded with calls from angry or upset people.”

He said an 84-year-old widow named Marilyn would not have traveled to Forest Hills despite voting in every election since 1955.

Residents who called the BOE to complain were told new mailers with the correct poll site would be sent out soon, but the Board had no immediate comment for the press.

 

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Op-Ed: Election equality long overdue


| oped@queenscourier.com

STATE SENATOR TOBY ANN STAVISKY AND ASSEMBLYMEMBER DAVID WEPRIN

Last Friday, we joined many leaders of the South Asian community from across Queens to commend the Board of Elections for its plan to provide voter assistance in Bengali for the upcoming elections.

While we were heartened by the plan put forth by the Board of Elections, which would include translated ballots at 60 Queens polling sites and expanded language assistance, these necessary improvements to our election process are long overdue.

On October 13, 2011, the Census Bureau indicated that Queens County was required under Section 203 of the Voting Rights Act to provide language assistance to Bengali-speaking voters. Since then, four primary and general elections have come and gone and Bengali-speaking citizens, 60 percent of whom have limited English proficiency, have not been provided the assistance they deserve to fully participate in our democratic system.

To live in, to work in and to vote in Queens is to be a part of one of the most diverse communities in our state. This diversity must be reflected in our electoral process.

We have been assured that the Board of Elections will follow through with their plan to provide Bengali language assistance in the upcoming primary and general elections, critical contests that will decide the future of our city.

Also on the ballot this November will be six constitutional amendments, including casino gambling. An informed electorate is essential in determining how to vote and voters need to understand these proposed amendments.

We also urge the state legislature to reconsider our bill that directs the Queens Board of Elections to provide written language assistance in Punjabi in addition to the languages currently available.

We’re both so proud to represent such vibrant communities made up of voices from all over the world. Now it’s time to make sure those voices, no matter if they’re English-speaking, Bengali-speaking or otherwise, are fully heard this coming Election Day.

State Senator Toby Ann Stavisky represents District 16 and Assemblymember David Weprin represents the 24th Assembly District. 

 

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60 Queens polling sites to have Bengali translations


| mchan@queenscourier.com

Ballots at 60 Queens polling sites this year will have Bengali translations, officials said, but advocates for South Asian voters are skeptical the move will crystallize.

“Our concern is that we were told in the past that Bengali ballots would be available, particularly for the November general election, and that did not happen,” said attorney Jerry Vattamala of the Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund (AALDEF).

“We took their word and we sort of got burned,” he added. “Enough is enough.”

A group of South Asian proponents of Bengali ballots filed a lawsuit against the city’s Board of Elections (BOE) on July 2 for its failure, despite assurances, to provide adequate bilingual language assistance in four elections since April 2012.

“We tried to work with them, but then we came to an understanding they weren’t going to do it,” Vattamala said. “We just want something legally enforceable — written confirmation that Bengali will in fact be on the ballot for the next election.”

AALDEF represents the suit’s three plaintiffs, who say the BOE has not complied with the Voting Rights Act of 1965. They argue that the law requires the city to provide election information and language assistance to South Asian minorities.

Parts of Queens have been covered under a provision of the act since October 13, 2011.

“You would think it wouldn’t have to come to a lawsuit,” Vattamala said. “But these things are very reasonable, what we’re asking for.”

BOE spokesperson Valerie Vazquez confirmed the borough would have, for the first time, Bengali language assistance for the September 10 primary and November general elections this year.

The 60 polling sites are located mostly in southern Queens near John F. Kennedy International Airport and near Sunnyside, Woodside, Jackson Heights, Elmhurt and Bellerose.

Depending on the number of voters with limited English proficiency in those areas, some of them could also have Hindi or Hindi-Punjabi interpreters.

“It was always our intention to be in full compliance for the 2013 election cycle,” Vazquez said.

Bengali translations were never promised for 2012 elections, Vazquez said, because ballot vendors needed to make technical modifications to the system.

As an interim plan, the board hired full-time staff interpreters and provided a translated candidates list at each polling site in the covered areas, the BOE said.

Supporters of the change are now cautiously optimistic, but agree it is a “tremendous step forward.”

“It’s bringing democracy to more people in Queens,” said John Prakash Albert, board chair of Taking Our Seat, a nonprofit group aimed at empowering South Asians voters.

State Senator Toby Ann Stavisky — who co-sponsored legislation that would require the BOE to provide written Bengali, Punjabi and Hindi language assistance — said implementing Bengali ballots “will have a direct and measurably positive impact on the lives of our neighbors.”

The bill was introduced in the state legislature last year, but never moved out of the Senate’s Elections Committee.

One of the plaintiffs in the lawsuit, Mazeda Uddin, the national women’s chair for the Alliance of South Asian American Labor, said the elections board is “still lacking.”

“They’re not giving us everything,” she said.

Advocates are seeking binding confirmation from the BOE, a formal Bengali language assistance compliance plan and an agreement to meet with a Bengali language advisory group.

“Last election, they promised me,” Uddin said. “This is the most important for our community. Our people can’t choose the right candidate for lack of access. So many voters can’t vote.”

 

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Council hopefuls get ready to fill Comrie seat


| mhayes@queenscourier.com

Photos courtesy of Sondra Peeden/Manuel Caughman/Facebook

The race to replace Councilmember Leroy Comrie for District 27 already has multiple contenders who are raring to address community issues.

Manuel Caughman, community liaison for Assemblymember William Scarborough; Bryan Block, Community Board 13 chair; Joan Flowers, local attorney; Sondra Peeden, a political consultant; and Daneek Miller, a community and labor activist, have all filed their names with the Board of Elections.

“I believe that as large a city as New York is, we can still get to a place where we have a sense of community, where people are willing to reach out and help each other and extend themselves on behalf of their neighbor,” Peeden said.

Peeden and her fellow candidates are focused on a variety of issues, namely education, foreclosures and crime.

“I want to work with young people [to] make sure they’re safe, and not perpetuating the things they can do when they’re misled or don’t have guidance in their life,” Miller said.

Caughman believes controlling gun violence is a goal to pursue and said he wants to work with police to development technologies needed to combat crime.

When it comes to education, Peeden sees the need to take schools out of mayoral control and bring it back to the community. Similarly, Caughman thinks more parental input is necessary.

Miller, if elected, hopes to look deep into school policies so they can continue to meet Department of Education (DOE) standards and avoid threats of closure.

Late last year, Comrie met with Miller about being his successor. After some thought, Miller said he took him up on his suggestion.

“[I feel] it’s a necessity to have a voice for the working people,” said Miller, who is currently the president of Amalgamated Transit Union (ATU) Local 1056. “If you have a record of bringing people together, folks gravitate towards that.”

The primary election is slated for June or September.

Block and Flowers did not return calls for comment as of press time.

 

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Queens GOP head drops lawsuit against new Republican election commissioner


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Queens County GOP Chairman Phil Ragusa has dropped his lawsuit claiming that the new Queens County Republican Commissioner for the Board of Elections was wrongly appointed, according to a document obtained by the New York Daily News.

Ragusa and ousted commissioner Judith Stupp were alleging that Councilman Eric Ulrich and two other members of the Republican cacus had no right to vote for the new commissioner Michael Michel because Stupp had already been selected to serve another term.

Even though Ragusa said he signed the required Certificate of Recommendation and sent it by mail in time, the caucus claimed that the reappointed wasn’t filed correctly.

 

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Queens GOP lawsuit claims election commissioner wrongly ousted


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

A recent lawsuit filed by the head of the Queens County GOP, Phil Ragusa, and reportedly funded by Republican mayoral candidate John Catsimatidis, alleges that the Board of Elections Queens County Republican Commissioner was wrongly ousted from the position.

According to court records, Ragusa, as well as the ousted commissioner, Judith Stupp, are claiming that three members of the New York City Council’s Republican caucus, including Councilmember Erich Ulrich, appointed Michael Michel as the new Republican Commissioner, even though Stupp had already been appointed to another term.

Following procedure, Ragusa said that he signed a Certificate of Recommendation and, according to when he filed it by mail, presumed that it was received by the Office of the Clerk of the Council by November 24 at the latest, and within the time allowed to make the reappointment legitimate.

But the caucus, claiming that it wasn’t filed correctly, appointed a new Republican Commissioner, Michel, on January 25.

Councilmember Ulrich was the only party reached as of press time and declined to comment.

 

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Queens’ Morning Roundup


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

TODAY’S FORECAST

Thursday: Mostly cloudy. High of 34F with a windchill as low as 16. Winds from the East at 5 to 10 mph. Thursday night: Overcast with a chance of snow, then snow after midnight. Low of 30 with a windchill as low as 23. Winds from the SE at 5 to 10 mph. Chance of snow 80%.

EVENT OF THE DAY: Peking Operas 

Celebrate the Chinese Lunar New Year with arias and episodes from two famous Peking Operas, Filial Visit of the Fourth Son and Henpecked King, presented by the New York Chinese Opera Society at the Flushing Libary . Free. Click here for more info or to submit an event of your own

NYC looking at 4-8 inches of snow, points north and east much more Friday

Forecasters say a nor’easter slated to hit Friday could dump large amounts of rain and snow across the Tri-State Area. Read more: CBS New York

No new date for NYC primaries after Albany lawmakers nix June, August proposals

Albany lawmakers are unable to agree on an earlier date for the New York City primaries, even after the city Board of Elections has sounded the alarm about the potential for chaos if the elections are held as scheduled in September. Read more: NBC New York

Man expected to plead guilty in alleged Federal Reserve bomb plot

A 21-year-old Bangladesh national is expected to appear in a federal court in Brooklyn Thursday to plead guilty to trying to blow up the Federal Reserve. Read more: NY1

NYC first to get realistic shooting simulation game for kids

A shooting simulation game that lets children pretend to have shootouts in an indoor fake village with a bank, offices and what appears to be a school has come to Queens and is raising concern among law enforcement authorities. Read more: NBC New York

Three unions back MLS soccer stadium project for Flushing Meadows-Corona Park

A trio of unions is throwing their weight behind a contentious proposal to construct a soccer stadium in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, the Daily News has learned. Read more: New York Daily News

Subway safety campaign features bloody MetroCards

Shocking MetroCards splattered with blood and the grim reaper are being handed out in an effort to get your attention. Read more: ABC New York

Brennan to face questions on interrogations, drones and leaks

President Barack Obama’s nominee to head the CIA, John Brennan, is expected to face tough questioning about leaks of sensitive information and U.S. spy activities from waterboarding to the use of drones when he appears at a Senate confirmation hearing on Thursday. Read more: Reuters

 

Joe Lhota officially enters mayoral race


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Lhoto photo courtesy of MTA/Flickr / Additional photos courtesy of Twitter (@JoeLhota)

It’s official. Joe Lhota, former CEO and chair of the MTA, is a mayoral candidate.

On Thursday Lhota filed papers with the Board of Elections to become the 109th mayor of New York City.

This morning on his newly created campaign website and Facebook page as well as on both his personal and campaign Twitter accounts he made the announcement:

He also tweeted an image with the slogan “A mayor for all of New York, proven leadership” and a photoshopped picture of Grand Central’s Mercury clock  with “Joe Lhota for Mayor” written below it.

The ex-transit head stepped down from his MTA position at the end of 2012 so he could ponder his candidacy, and said he would make his final decision on running in early January.

Lhota, a former deputy mayor for operations during the Rudy Giuliani administration, will reportedly run as a Republican.

Among his own party Lhota is a top contender, according to a Quinnipiac University poll released Wednesday.

Twenty-three percent of New York City voters said they would vote for Lhota in a Republican primary for mayor.

Coming in second was supermarket mogul John Catsimatidis with nine percent, followed by newspaper publisher Tom Allon with five percent, former Bronx Borough President Adolfo Carrion with three percent and Doe Fund founder George McDonald with two percent.

But 53 percent of those surveyed were still undecided.

The same Quinnipiac poll also found that voters would back several potential Democratic candidates, City Council Speaker Christine Quinn, Public Advocate Bill de Blasio and City Comptroller William Thompson, over Lhota by a 3-1 margin or more.

 

 

Candidates vie for Sanders’ City Council seat in special election


| mhayes@queenscourier.com

Candidates 15th district

A vacant seat has been left in the 31st Council District by James Sanders’ ascent to the State Senate, and more than one candidate hopes to slide into the spot.

A special election is set to be held on February 19 for the coveted Council seat, covering parts of Springfield Gardens, Laurelton and Rosedale. The race has attracted several different candidates thus far, many of whom have hit the campaign trail running.

Sanders’ former chief-of-staff, Donovan Richards, is considered the front runner, according to multiple media reports. Richards has received endorsements from not only his former boss, but also from the City Council’s Progressive Caucus and the Working Families Party. He worked in the City Council for ten years under Sanders (pictured right), and is now looking to acquire his own seat.

In order to be eligible to run, all candidates must file with the Board of Elections (BOE) by January 15.

Valerie Vazquez, a BOE spokesperson, said that as of press time, Allan Jennings, a former City Councilmember, and Selvena Brooks, who has worked in the State Senate, have filed to run.

Brooks filed her candidacy under the party name “Rebuild Now,” referencing not only rebuilding post-Sandy, but also rebuilding the education system, local economy and neighborhoods.

Marie Adam-Ovide, the district manager of Community Board 8, has been expected to announce her candidacy, as is Earnest Flowers, former chief-of-staff of Assemblymember William Scarborough. Flowers boasts a reputation of making his promises a reality, and having “quantifiable work.”

“The reason why we don’t get a lot of things done is because no one puts anything down on paper, so no one can be held accountable,” said Flowers. “Everything I do is transparent.”

Flowers recently held a fundraising event for his campaign in his home, where he spoke to a crowd of roughly 60 about his passion for the community.

Many others are rumored to join the race, and will face each other on Thursday, February 7 at the 31st District Candidates’ Night. Members of the community will join the candidates in Laurelton at St. Luke’s

Cathedral where they will be given the opportunity to ask the Council hopefuls questions regarding their positions.

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Korean interpreter filling out ballots in Flushing, poll worker alleges


| mchan@queenscourier.com

DSC_0546w

A Korean-American interpreter was allegedly expelled from a Flushing poll site this afternoon after he was caught filling out ballots for voters, a poll watcher said.

The Board of Elections (BOE) interpreter — who was identified as a man in his 60s named Sang — allegedly told some Korean-speaking locals at P.S. 20 to cast their votes for President Barack Obama and other Democratic candidates in statewide elections, including Korean Assembly hopeful Ron Kim.

The poll site worker also allegedly filled out ballots for some voters, pushing a Democratic slate, sources claim.

“The interpreter told the voter, ‘Hey, because you’re Korean, you want to vote for Obama and Ron Kim and down the line, all Democrats,’” said poll watcher Daniel Baek.

Baek, 30, said the man told Korean voters to come to his table for language assistance. He had assisted 51 people from 6 a.m. to around 2 p.m., Baek said, pointing to records.

“I don’t know how many of those voters are tainted,” Baek said. “He actually darkened the circle on behalf of the voters. I couldn’t afford to let him do that to more voters.”

Baek said he contacted his headquarters, which then contacted the BOE. A BOE coordinator then allegedly asked the man to pack up and leave shortly before 2 p.m., he said.

BOE officials did not immediately confirm the misconduct, which Baek said is still occurring at several other poll sites in Flushing, including St. Mary’s Nativity Church.

“I don’t think it matters if you’re a Democrat or Republican. Voter fraud is a terrible thing,” said Kevin Ryan, spokesperson for Republican Councilmember Dan Halloran, who is running for Congress and is also on the ballot at P.S. 20. “This is not something we want to mess around with, and it’s not to be tolerated.”

Phil Gim, the Republican contender challenging Kim, called on the BOE to fully investigate the matter.

“There is nothing more important than maintaining the integrity of our election process. The people of our community have a right to an election free from illegal manipulation,” Gim said. “The citizens of our [district] cannot have confidence in their elected officials if the manner in which they are elected is in any doubt.”

Absentee ballot sent to deceased woman — for more than two years


| brennison@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Billy Rennison

Angela Taborsky believed in the power of voting. She made certain every year to cast a ballot, and when she was no longer able to make the trip to the polling site, she registered for an absentee ballot.

Taborsky died two years ago, but in every election since, she has received an absentee ballot, remaining eligible to vote.

“[My mother] instilled in us that voting was your power to make a difference, but she should not still be given that power from the grave,” said Roseanne Frankel, Taborsky’s daughter.

Frankel has been receiving the official correspondence from the Board of Elections (BOE) at Taborsky’s former Little Neck residence in each election since her mother died in July 2010.

“I can’t be the only one, and who knows if they’re voting,” Frankel said.

The only way to get an individual’s name removed from the election roll is to provide a death certificate or a certified letter to the BOE that the person has died, said Valerie Vazquez, spokesperson for the agency.

Short of this, ballots will continually be sent out until the voter is declared ineligible, a process that could take years. Without notification, the BOE does not know how many ballots are being sent to residents long dead, Vazquez said, or if they are being filled out and counted as votes.

“There would be no way for us to know that,” Vazquez said.

Councilmember Peter Vallone, who sits on the City Council’s Committee on Governmental Operations, which oversees the BOE, said he plans on speaking with the agency to see “what needs to be done to remedy this situation as soon as possible.”

“It doesn’t make sense for the BOE to wait until they receive a death certificate from a family to remove someone from the permanent absentee list,” said Vallone, who is penning a letter to the BOE on the subject. “I’m sure that’s not at the top of a family’s to-do list after a loved one dies, if anyone is even aware of this requirement.”

The BOE’s only defense against someone casting another person’s absentee ballot is the potential jail sentence.

“If you’re filling it out that would be fraudulent,” Vazquez said. “The person who did that would be perpetuating a crime.”

Votes from the deceased has long been an issue throughout the country. In 2006, a Poughkeepsie Journal investigation uncovered as many as 77,000 dead residents on New York’s election rolls, with more than 2,500 of them casting votes.

Last year, the Staten Island Advance discovered thousands of voters still registered with the city long after they died, including former politicians and celebrities. Nationally, more than 1.8 million deceased individuals are listed as voters, according to the Pew Center on the States.

Problems have plagued the BOE, with Mayor Michael Bloomberg calling the agency “incompetent” in July.

Prior to the September primary, the BOE sent out mailers to voters with incorrect poll sites, and several voters were turned away from the polls during primary day mix-ups. This year, Bengali will not be on ballots, though it is required by law,

Of the millions of registered voters in the city, more than 9,000 receive absentee ballots.

Frankel said that with local elections often coming down to the wire, a few votes can make a difference.

“My mother’s dead, I don’t want her deciding any elections.”

October 12 last day to register for general election, mayoral primary


| brennison@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/photo by Alexa Altman

If you want to cast a ballot in this year’s presidential election — or next year’s mayoral primary — October 12 is the last day to register to vote.

New York ranks near the bottom of the country in voter registration; less than 64 percent of eligible residents are registered to vote, ranking the state 47th in the nation.

Click here to find out if you’re registered to vote

To be able to vote in the general elections — which includes president, Congress, Senate and state offices — on November 6, your application must be postmarked no later than Friday, October 12 and received by October 17. You may also register in person at your local Board of Elections or any voter registration center.  Change of addresses must also be received by October 17.

Governor Andrew Cuomo announced a new initiative in August — online registration — to help increase voter numbers.

According to the governor’s office, registration rates jumped from 28 to 53 percent among voters 18 to 24 in Arizona after online registration was introduced.

Residents can now log on to their computers to register to vote, change their address or update party enrollment.

If you want to register electronically, you can now visit the Department of Motor Vehicle’s “MyDMV” web site.  You will also be able to register paper-free at local DMV offices.

Though it is nearly a year away, unregistered voters or those wishing to switch parties have until October 12 if they would like to vote in the 2013 mayoral primary elections.  City residents cannot change enrollment and vote in that parties primary in the same year.

The city’s Board of Elections website says, “The last day to change your enrollment is the same as the last day to register for the General Election.”

According to the New York Times, “The law is rooted in the notion that closed primaries should not be raided, at the last minute, by outsiders who may want to pick, say, a weaker candidate to run against their preferred choice in a general election.”