Tag Archives: Bill de Blasio

Queens’ Morning Roundup


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

morning roundup

TODAY’S FORECAST

Monday: A mix of clouds and sun. High 49. Winds light and variable. Monday night: Partly cloudy. Low 38. Winds NNE at 5 to 10 mph.

EVENT OF THE DAY: LEGACY: Photographs from Emily Fisher Landau’s Gift to the Whitney Museum of American Art

LEGACY: Photographs from Emily Fisher Landau’s Gift to the Whitney Museum of American Art at the Fisher Landau Center for Arts in Long Island City. The collection includes 419 works, namely installations, sculptures, drawings, photographs, etc. by numerous key figures in contemporary American Art. FREE. Exhibition hours are Thursday through Monday, noon to 5 p.m. The Fisher Landau Center for Arts is located at 38-27 30th Street Long Island City. Through March 31. Click here for more info or to submit an event of your own

Queens resident killed in Metro-North train derailment

A Queens resident was one of four people who died Sunday morning when a Metro-North train derailed in the Bronx, according to published reports. Read more: The Queens Courier

Bill de Blasio to meet Sheldon Silver, Democrats key to his tax hike plan

Mayor-elect Bill de Blasio will pay a visit Monday to Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver’s annual holiday luncheon for his Democratic members, the Daily News has learned. Read more: New York Daily News

Crackdown on subway beggars straining NYPD resources

The NYPD is cracking down on subway panhandlers — and sources said the initiative is taking precious manpower away from preventing iPhone thefts and shoving incidents, The Post has learned. Read more: New York Post

Higher tolls take effect on NJ-NY crossings

Motorists are now paying more to the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey when they drive from New Jersey into New York City. Read more: NBC New York

Activists gather in Times Square for World AIDS Day

A throng of activists rallied in Times Square Sunday to commemorate the 25th World AIDS Day. Read more: CBS New York

 

 

Queens helps with de Blasio transition


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photo Courtesy the Long Island City Partnership

Queens is taking part in Transition NYC.

Mayor-Elect Bill de Blasio announced the appointment of 60 leaders and experts to his transition committee on Wednesday, November 20.

“My charge to the transition team is to identify women and men from every part of our city and walk of life that share a commitment to progressive and competent city government,” said de Blasio. “They will be advising me based on their wealth of experience and knowledge of specific issue areas and government agencies.”

The Transition NYC team members, who will be volunteering their time during the transition, include several leaders from Queens organizations and institutions.

They are Hoong Yee Lee Krakauer, executive director, Queens Council on the Arts; Udai Tambar, executive director, South Asian Youth Action; Elsie Saint Louis, executive director, Haitian-Americans United for Progress, Inc.; Dr. Marcia Keizs, president, York College, The City University of New York; and Jukay Hsu, founder, Coalition for Queens.

“I am honored to be contributing to the creation of a new administration, a team New Yorkers can be proud of,” said Krakauer in a post on the Queens Council on the Arts website. “And to do that I will look to you, the creative citizens of this amazing borough, for your ideas and thoughts to bring back to the big table.”

Queens also took part in the new administration’s transition through two panel discussions that were held at the de Blasio Talking Transition Tent in downtown Manhattan on Friday, November 22.

“Thrive in Queens,” hosted by The Noguchi Museum, the Queens Economic Development Corporation and Long Island City Partnership, focused on the creative sector of the borough.

According to The Noguchi Museum Director Jenny Dixon, who moderated the first panel, they also spoke about “the need for greater marketing dollars and better public transportation,” and requested that the de Blasio administration “affirm the borough of Queens through an inclusive agenda weighted equally for all of the five boroughs.”

“A great gathering of Queens folks were in the audience and similarly a great group of Queens’ economic drivers were represented on the panel,” said Dixon.

“We hope what we have to say will be heard.”

 

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Queens’ Morning Roundup


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

morning roundup

TODAY’S FORECAST

Tuesday: Cloudy. Highs in the low 40s with temperatures nearly steady overnight. Tuesday night: Periods of rain. Rain becoming heavy at times overnight. Low around 40. E winds at 10 to 15 mph, increasing to 20 to 30 mph. 1 to 2 inches of rain expected.

EVENT OF THE DAY: Classical Music Concert

The Tuesday Morning Music Club of Douglaston presents a program with live piano, guitar and voice, followed by a sandwich lunch and dessert Douglaston Community Church at 11 a.m. Click here for more info or to submit an event of your own

De Blasio: Landslide win is ‘clear mandate’ for education reform

Bill de Blasio says his landslide in this month’s New York City mayoral election entitles him to support from Albany to enact sweeping reforms to the city’s schools. Read more: CBS New York/AP

City launches new campaign against sugary drinks

The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene on Monday launched a new anti-obesity campaign, focusing on the risks posed by sugary drinks. Read more: CBS New York

NYPIRG proposes campaign donation limits

A government watchdog group is calling for strict limits on money individuals and corporations can give candidates in state elections. Read more: AP

Reagan letter tops auction of Ed Koch items

Letters from former President Ronald Reagan and Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis were the most popular items Monday at an auction of materials that belonged to ex-Mayor Ed Koch. Read more: NBC New York

Storm to threaten holiday travel, moving east

A winter storm system that hit parts of Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas swept toward the densely populated East Coast on Tuesday, threatening to disrupt the plans of travelers ahead of the long Thanksgiving holiday weekend. Read more: AP

Queens’ Morning Roundup


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

morning roundup

TODAY’S FORECAST

Friday: Overcast with rain showers. High of 61. Winds from the WSW at 10 to 15 mph. Chance of rain 60%. Friday night: Overcast with a chance of rain. Low of 37. Winds from the WNW at 5 to 20 mph. Chance of rain 50%.

EVENT OF THE DAY: Fall Festival: Free Film Screening and Community Health Fair

Come to a free community health fair and film screening of “A Place at the Table” with special guest Joel Berg Harvest Room in the Jamaica Market from 4:00 – 7:00 p.m. Attendees are encouraged to bring canned goods for a Thanksgiving Food Drive. Snacks from the Jamaica Farmers’ Market will also be provided! Sponsored by the Neighborhood Hunger Network. Click here for more info or to submit an event of your own

Mayor Bloomberg: Mayor-Elect de Blasio to get balanced budget

For the first time in decades, an incoming New York City mayor will not face a budget deficit. Read more: CBS New York/AP

NYPD asks bars to not serve ‘SantaCon’ participants

There may be a little less “jolly” in Santa’s sleigh this year, at least if the NYPD has its way. Read more: ABC New York

Weprin goes to bat for Mariano Rivera street

At least one candidate for council speaker is going to bat for Yankee great Mariano Rivera. Read more: New York Post

NFL embraces possibility of snowy Super Bowl

Instead of shrinking from the possibility that football’s ultimate game could be played in a blizzard, organizers of the first outdoor, cold-climate Super Bowl have decided to embrace the snow as the game’s unofficial theme. Read more: NBC New York

JFK assassination remembered 50 years later

Fifty years after President John F. Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963, thousands will mark the day with a solemn ceremony in Dealey Plaza, through which the president’s motorcade passed when shots rang out. Read more: AP

Weprin vies to become next Council speaker


| tcullen@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/File photo

It’s off to the races for six legislators looking to become the next City Council speaker.

Councilmembers Melissa Mark-Viverito, Inez Dickens, Dan Garodnick, James Vacca, Anabel Palma and Mark Weprin are vying to replace incumbent-Council Speaker Christine Quinn, who is term-limited.

Quinn was voted to lead the Council, the city’s de facto second most powerful office, in 2005.

Weprin, the top Queens candidate in the race, was elected to the Council in 2009 after 15 years in the Assembly. He is campaigning on a promise that he will not run for higher office and is not term-limited in 2017.

“I am not running for the mayor of the City of New York,” Weprin told The Courier. “I can spend all my time being the best speaker I can be. I think one thing that has been lacking in previous speakers is they have all been running for higher office.”

Mark-Viverito, an ally to Mayor-elect Bill de Blasio, is considered a top contender for the seat.
Candidates have been taking part in forums throughout the city, though councilmembers will internally vote on a new speaker January 4.

 

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Majority of Queens schools score well on progress reports


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

The majority of Queens schools scored high on the Department of Education’s (DOE) recently released progress reports.

Out of the 62 Queens high schools that were issued 2012-2013 progress reports, 31 earned As, 16 Bs, 6 Cs, 5 Ds and 4 Fs.

The highest scoring institution was Long Island City’s Academy for Careers in Television and Film, which just moved into a new building at the beginning of this school year. It received an overall score of 100.9.

Flushing High School, Pan American International High School in Elmhurst, Frederick Douglass Academy VI High School in Far Rockaway and August Martin High School in Jamaica earned overall failing grades.

Progress reports were issued for 239 Queens elementary and middle schools. Fifty-eight of them earned As, 97 Bs, 74 Cs, nine Ds and only one, Springfield Gardens’ Community Voices Middle School, failed.

Waterside School for Leadership in Rockaway was the highest ranking Queens middle school, with an overall score of 90.3, and P.S. 203 Oakland Gardens was the top-rated elementary school in the borough, with an overall score of 86.5.

Across the city, the DOE found public school performance “remained consistent, with 87 percent of schools maintaining their grade or moving one grade compared to last year.”

The reports are based on students’ progress, performance, attendance and surveys of parents, students and teachers. High school progress reports also measure college and career readiness.

According to the DOE, more students are graduating from high school ready for college and careers.

The reports found that the four-year college readiness rate is up nearly 3 points since last year.

“The most important job of our schools is ensuring students are on track to succeed in college and their careers,” said Schools Chancellor Dennis Walcott. “These results are further evidence that the hard work of our teachers and principals is paying off.”

This year’s school progress reports were the last ones issued during Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s tenure.

They could see some changes when they are issued under the Bill de Blasio administration.

“While Mayor-elect de Blasio supports making overall school progress reports available to parents, he would eliminate letter grades of schools which offer little real insight to parents and are not a reliable indicator of how schools are actually performing,” his spokesperson Lis Smith said.

To find a specific school’s progress report, visit http://schools.nyc.gov/ProgressReport.

 

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Street Talk: What would you like the de Blasio administration to do differently?


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

street talk

They should change the manner in which they do stop-and-frisk, not get rid of it all together. Crime has dropped; why do away with it?
Catherine Vodola

I’d like to see de Blasio keep his promises! I’d like him to be the better-man; better than all of the cynical nay-sayers. He should keep our public schools open, take care of our neighborhoods and put an end to minority targeting that goes on in the stop-and-frisk procedure.
Sharia Jones-Bey

I would like them to bring our real estate taxes down.
Rob Brtmandracchia

I hope he makes borough healthcare services more accessible. Everyone from every walk of life deserves the best care possible.
Emily Miao 

I’d like to see him continue Bloomberg’s successful programs. He should continue focusing on education. He’s rather inexperienced; hopefully he’ll gain insight on the job.
Dean Zias

It would be great if he could think of some road and mass transit projects to ease traffic/congestion on city highways. He should also do away with traffic light cameras; I think there are better ways to raise money for the city.
Keith Dennis

I want the crime rate to stay where it is. The de Blasio administration should let the police do their jobs. We have to keep New York City safe!”
Bill Delawski

I hope the new mayor will enable children from all over the city, equal opportunities. I also hope he will continue programs that protect and support children.
Heather Blackman

BY RACHEL LANDAU

 

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LIC, Astoria best bet for hailing green cabs


| mchan@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of the Taxi & Limousine Commission

Queens taxi riders have the best shot at hailing a green cab in Long Island City and Astoria.

Nearly 900 new apple green cabs roam the northwestern edge of the borough, according to data from the Taxi & Limousine Commission (TLC).

City officials said more than 1,000 borough taxis have hit the streets since the first fleet of its kind rolled out in early August.

“Borough taxis have quickly proven themselves to be immensely popular, with almost 300,000 rides having already taken place,” said Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who proposed the plan in 2011. “The new taxis have been a hit with both riders and drivers, and they will become an increasingly common sight in communities that previously lacked taxi service.”

LIC and Astoria, near the western part of the Ravenswood Houses, have 223 wheelchair-accessible green cabs and 675 standard ones, TLC data shows.

The area also includes the strip of land bordering the East River, the Queensbridge Houses and a portion of the neighborhood north of Queens Plaza and west of Northern Boulevard.

“They are all over the place in Long Island City and Astoria,” said passenger David Gutierrez.

“They’ve just become part of the community.”

The 31-year-old LIC resident, who cruises to Astoria in a green cab for business almost every day, said he has no trouble spotting one.

“I like the green color,” he said. “You definitely can’t miss them.”

Neighborhoods with the lowest number of green cabs include Flushing, Far Rockaway, Forest Hills and Middle Village, according to TLC data. There is at least one street hail livery base in each of those regions but no licensed green cabs listed.

Heather Bartone of Astoria said Steinway Street is a “green cab central,” but she is often left stranded in Flushing, where she works.

“I rarely see any in Flushing, so instead I have to take a regular taxi back home,” said Bartone, 41.

City officials announced Tuesday a new website called www.borotaxis.org, created to let New Yorkers suggest new green cab locations.

The new taxis are licensed to pick up street hails anywhere in the city, except in certain parts of Manhattan and at airports.

They charge the same fare as yellow cabs and must also have taximeters, a TLC permit number, credit card machines, roof lights and rate information printed on its front driver and passenger doors.

The TLC said it has already finished selling its first 6,000 borough taxi licenses allotted this year.

However, Mayor-elect Bill de Blasio has been a staunch opponent of the new taxi plan, going so far as to say he would fire Taxi & Limousine Commissioner David Yassky, according to reports.

Councilmember Peter Vallone Jr., who chairs the Public Safety Committee, said the commission has not yet cracked down on pockets of illegal hail activity as promised.

“It seems the green cabs are just sitting outside train stops with livery cabs that are still illegally picking up passengers,” he said. “That wasn’t the deal.”

A TLC spokesperson said the commission would soon beef up enforcement after more than doubling its field strength over the past two years.

 

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Jackson Heights, Corona community marches for safer streets after traffic deaths


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Angy Altamirano

It was the final straw, and now the Jackson Heights and Corona communities are saying no more.

Family members of traffic accident victims, local elected officials and community members gathered Tuesday night to set off the inaugural action known as “Three Children Too Many.”

The group marched down Northern Boulevard, then 82nd Street, stopping to make statements about traffic control and give performances along the way. They then gathered on 79th Street and 37th Avenue to rally and remember young local lives that were cut short.

“You cope with this kind of thing and you feel terrible, sad, angry, but then there’s a tipping point,” said Laura Newman, one of the organizers of the march and resident of Jackson Heights. “We actually have to make it stop.”

Just a month before three-year-old Olvin Jahir Figueroa was fatally struck by an alleged drunk driver, Jackson Heights resident Luis Bravo, 19, lost his life in a hit-and-run in Woodside. In December of last year, 11-year-old Miguel Torres was killed as he tried to cross the street heading to school on Northern Boulevard.

In April Councilmember Daniel Dromm led the push to bring more slow zones to Jackson Heights, focusing on the side streets that meet Northern Boulevard.

“Three Children Too Many” calls on mayor-elect Bill de Blasio to choose a police commissioner who will make sure law enforcement for vehicular crimes is strongly enforced and demands more traffic calming zones, continued traffic safety education for local children, and action facilitators to lead the community towards greater safety.

“Safety is (Department of Transportation) DOT’s top priority and the agency participated in [Tuesday’s] event to highlight our shared goal of making streets safer for everyone using them,” said DOT spokesperson Nicole Garcia. “We also have been in touch with the local community, including the march’s organizers and elected officials to get feedback, share education materials and discuss ways to enhance safety at this intersection and the surrounding area.”

The agency is also looking at the signal timing at Northern and Junction Boulevards to determine if adjustments can be made, said Garcia.

Michelle L. Kaucic, community coordinator of the DOT’s Safety Education and Outreach, said the community needs to continue advocating for change and must also spread the word of not drinking and driving. The community and DOT need to work together to make the streets safe as possible, said Kaucic.

At the end of the march, participants held a moment of silence and a candlelight vigil honoring Olvin, Luis, Miguel and other victims, as family members spoke.

“Safe streets are not a luxury, it’s what we deserve,” said Councilmember Julissa Ferreras, who lost two of her best friends 20 years ago to a fatal traffic accident involving a drunk driver. “After losing several of our mothers, fathers, children and friends to fatal traffic collisions, we simply cannot tolerate to lose one more.”

 

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A Willets Point wish list for de Blasio


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Photo by Thad Komorowski

THAD KOMOROWSKI

The $3 billion plan to transform Willets Point from a grungy haven for auto shops into a slick shopping mega center has sparked protests, petitions and even a hunger strike since the Bloomberg administration announced the project.

But opponents largely fell silent after the City Council voted to approve the plan on October 9. Now, they’re waiting to see what the incoming mayor might do.

Willets Point United, an organization that has protested the proposal since it was announced, has kept quiet in the wake of the Council’s decision. Normally updating its blog and Twitter feed with the frequency of a teenager, the group has been unresponsive to reporters’ calls and emails.

The silence has even extended to the group’s attorney Michael Rikon, who also represents business owners in Willets Points, located in the shadow of Citi Field.

“Maybe the organization is so exhausted from the fight that they would not come up to my office,” Rikon said. “They may be in a really bad bind. But I can’t represent an organization that won’t meet with its attorney.”

While Willets Point United may be quiet, resentment of the plan is alive and well among the affected business owners.

Arturo Olaya, proprietor of Arthur’s Auto Trim, said the city is displacing him and other Willets Point business owners without giving them enough money or understanding the area’s way of life.

“People here can’t pick up a business and move it,” Olaya said. “Willets Point grew up by itself with no help from the government. Now Bloomberg is just concerned with big business and wants to level everybody out.”

Queens residents are suffering from the redevelopment plan too, said Alan Gross, a Census Bureau field representative who lives in North Flushing.

“Those shops provide an important service to people in Queens, and I experienced that firsthand,” Gross said. “People can’t afford to go to the dealerships and get parts from part stores themselves.”

Locals say they would have preferred to improve the neighborhood in small ways. If simple sewage, street and gas repair were done, Rikon said, Willets Point would repair itself.

But John Choe, director of One Flushing Community Economic Development Center, said that smaller community needs getting abandoned in favor of large-scale development is a hallmark of the Bloomberg era.

“We have fallen by the wayside,” Choe said. “Maybe the next administration could do a better job addressing the needs of the surroundings here.”

Newly elected Mayor Bill de Blasio has not commented on the Willets Point redevelopment, and didn’t respond to inquiries.

The construction of the project’s mall is set for completion by the time of the next mayor’s second term or exit in 2018. Choe said locals can only hope Bloomberg’s successor will take the small communities’ needs seriously as the project progresses.

“We’re looking for more of a presence of the mayor, where they’re actually coming to the neighborhood besides in election time,” Choe said. “We’re hoping the next mayor will have a longer outlook of what’s going on here and an active interest in us.”

 

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Queens’ Morning Roundup


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

morning roundup

TODAY’S FORECAST

Thursday: Overcast with rain showers, then a chance of rain in the afternoon. High of 63. Breezy. Winds from the SW at 10 to 20 mph shifting to the WNW in the afternoon. Chance of rain 60%. Thursday night: Partly cloudy in the evening, then clear. Low of 41F. Breezy. Winds from the NW at 10 to 20 mph.

EVENT OF THE DAY: Romeo and Juliet

The Poetics Theatre Collective presents a unique staging of Shakespeare’s timeless love story Romeo and Juliet in an intimate setting at the Secret Theatre in Long Island City from Thursday, November 7 – Saturday, November 16. Click here for more info or to submit an event of your own

NYPD commissioner appointment in limbo after Bill de Blasio elected

The clock is ticking for the newly elected mayor to name a police commissioner — the first changing of the guard at the NYPD in 12 years. Read more: New York Daily News

Twitter sets IPO of $26 per share

Twitter late Wednesday set a price of $26 for its initial public offering of stock, which means the company’s shares can begin trading Thursday on the New York Stock Exchange. Read more: CBS New York/AP

Ray Kelly in the running for JPMorgan job

NYPD Commissioner Ray Kelly, unwanted by Mayor-elect Bill de Blasio, is in the running for a top security job at JPMorgan Chase, sources at the financial giant told The Post. Read more: New York Post

David Dinkins released from hospital

Former New York City Mayor David Dinkins has been released from the hospital after treatment for pneumonia. Read more: AP

Blockbuster Video to shut down remaining U.S. stores

Not so many years ago, a Blockbuster video store could be found in virtually every neighborhood in the city. Read more: CBS New York/AP

 

 

Newly elected mayor de Blasio meets with Bloomberg


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

New York’s next mayor met with the current mayor this morning at City Hall.

Hours after Bill de Blasio won Tuesday’s election in a landslide victory, he spoke with Mayor Michael Bloomberg in a private sit down, according to the AP.

De Blasio, addressing media at the steps of City Hall, said he “feels great,” reported the AP.

“All this, it’s incredible.” he added.

De Blasio also launched his transition website and Twitter handle @nyctransition today.

 

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De Blasio elected mayor in landslide


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photo by Lauren Epifanio

Bill de Blasio, in a landslide victory, has been elected as the city’s first Democratic mayor in two decades.

With 99 percent of the precincts reporting, de Blasio won Tuesday’s race with 73 percent of the vote, according to unofficial results. His Republican opponent, Joe Lhota, had 24 percent.

“Today, you spoke out loudly and clearly for a new direction for our city, united by a belief that our city should leave no New Yorker behind,” de Blasio said in his victory speech.

“Tackling inequality isn’t easy; it never has been and it never will be. The challenges we face have been decades in the making, and the problems we set out to address will not be solved overnight,” he added.

“But make no mistake: the people of this city have chosen a progressive path, and tonight we set forth on it, together, as one city.”

As far back as late June, polls still showed de Blasio, the city’s public advocate, finishing fourth in the Democratic primary.

City Council Speaker Christine Quinn was the early front-runner, but when former Congressmember Anthony Weiner entered the Democratic primary in May, her lead shrunk in the polls.

Weiner, however, soon faced another sexting scandal, and he lost favorability with voters.

In July, de Blasio started to gain in the polls, and took the lead away from Quinn the following month.

De Blasio’s surge in the polls coincided with the release of a campaign ad starring his teenage son Dante, whose Afro took center stage.

His momentum continued until the primary, where de Blasio beat second-place finisher, former City Comptroller Bill Thompson by a significant lead.

But, with de Blasio still hovering around the 40 percent threshold needed to avoid an October 1 runoff, Thompson would not concede on primary night.

Thompson dropped out of the race six days later, and in late September the Board of Elections certified de Blasio the official Democratic nominee with just over 40 percent.

Lhota, the ex-MTA chairman and former deputy mayor under Rudy Giuliani, easily secured the Republican nomination with 53 percent of the vote, topping grocery store mogul John Catsimatidis and Doe Fund founder George McDonald.

But Lhota’s success within his own party could not be replicated in the general election.

“We are five boroughs, but we are one city. We are one people and we want our city to move forward, not backwards. And I do hope our mayor-elect understands this before it’s too late,” said Lhota, conceding the race.

“It’s natural tonight to feel some disappointment. But tomorrow we must move beyond it. It was a good fight and it was a fight worth having,” he continued.

With a heavy Democratic electorate in the city, early on polls showed de Blasio beating Lhota by a wide margin.

The heated battle between the two and their different visions for the city were evident throughout the general election campaign and the three debates between the candidates, where they clashed on a range of issues, including taxes, education and crime.

Though Lhota promised a safer city under his watch, suggesting crime would go up under a de Blasio administration, voters ultimately favored de Blasio’s progressive message and saw him as a break from the Bloomberg years.

-With additional reporting by Meaghan McGoldrick

Updated 2:12 a.m. 

 

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Queens’ Morning Roundup


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

morning roundup

TODAY’S FORECAST

Monday: Partly cloudy. High of 48. Winds from the NE at 5 to 15 mph. Monday night: Overcast in the evening, then partly cloudy. Low of 41. Winds from the ENE at 5 to 10 mph

EVENT OF THE DAY:  Sunnyside Restaurant Week

The Sunnyside Shines Business Improvement District (BID) is holding its first-ever Sunnyside Restaurant Week from November 4 to 8. The five-day celebration will offer participants a “culinary journey through Sunnyside,” featuring special three course dinner menus for $25 at 17 participating local restaurants. Six of the 17 will also feature two course lunch menus for $10. Click here for more info or to submit an event of your own

NYC Marathon returns amid increased security; Mutai, Jeptoo of Kenya win titles

A year after it was canceled at the last minute by Hurricane Sandy, more than 50,000 runners participated in the 43rd running of the New York City Marathon, taking on the 26.2 miles through the five boroughs. Read more: NBC New York

Bill de Blasio, ahead in poll, dismisses Joe Lhota’s attacks on sleeping late

As a new poll showed his mayoral dreams slipping away, Joe Lhota launched a novel attack, charging that Bill de Blasio’s inability to get up in the morning shows he’s unfit to lead the city that never sleeps. Read more: New York Daily News

Barclays Center accused in lawsuit of mistreatment based on race

The Barclays Center has been accused of mistreating luxury box holders who are African-American. Read more: CBS New York

Lhota slams Harry Belafonte for ‘race baiting’ comments

Mayoral candidates Bill de Blasio and Joe Lhota each hit the campaign trail Sunday with several events around the city. Read more: CBS New York

Missing NYU student found trapped between wall of dorm, parking garage

A 19-year-old New York University student who went missing over the weekend was found trapped in a narrow gap between a dorm and a neighboring parking garage in lower Manhattan, where rescuers had to break through a wall Sunday night to free him. Read more: NBC New York

Gunman in LAX shooting told police he acted alone

The gunman accused of shooting employees and terrorizing travelers at Los Angeles International Airport accomplished two of his goals: kill a Transportation Security Administration officer and show how easy it is to get a gun into an airport. Read more: AP

The Queens Courier endorses Bill de Blasio for mayor


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

File photo

The Queens Courier is pleased to endorse Democrat Bill de Blasio for mayor of New York.

Since taking office, de Blasio has stood for the interests of the middle and working classes, pushing for better public schools, protesting the closure of community hospitals, and generally advocating for a city government more responsive to the needs of outer borough residents.

So when you go to the polls, be sure to cast your vote for Bill de Blasio.