Tag Archives: Bill de Blasio

Jackson Heights, Corona community marches for safer streets after traffic deaths


| aaltamirano@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Angy Altamirano

It was the final straw, and now the Jackson Heights and Corona communities are saying no more.

Family members of traffic accident victims, local elected officials and community members gathered Tuesday night to set off the inaugural action known as “Three Children Too Many.”

The group marched down Northern Boulevard, then 82nd Street, stopping to make statements about traffic control and give performances along the way. They then gathered on 79th Street and 37th Avenue to rally and remember young local lives that were cut short.

“You cope with this kind of thing and you feel terrible, sad, angry, but then there’s a tipping point,” said Laura Newman, one of the organizers of the march and resident of Jackson Heights. “We actually have to make it stop.”

Just a month before three-year-old Olvin Jahir Figueroa was fatally struck by an alleged drunk driver, Jackson Heights resident Luis Bravo, 19, lost his life in a hit-and-run in Woodside. In December of last year, 11-year-old Miguel Torres was killed as he tried to cross the street heading to school on Northern Boulevard.

In April Councilmember Daniel Dromm led the push to bring more slow zones to Jackson Heights, focusing on the side streets that meet Northern Boulevard.

“Three Children Too Many” calls on mayor-elect Bill de Blasio to choose a police commissioner who will make sure law enforcement for vehicular crimes is strongly enforced and demands more traffic calming zones, continued traffic safety education for local children, and action facilitators to lead the community towards greater safety.

“Safety is (Department of Transportation) DOT’s top priority and the agency participated in [Tuesday’s] event to highlight our shared goal of making streets safer for everyone using them,” said DOT spokesperson Nicole Garcia. “We also have been in touch with the local community, including the march’s organizers and elected officials to get feedback, share education materials and discuss ways to enhance safety at this intersection and the surrounding area.”

The agency is also looking at the signal timing at Northern and Junction Boulevards to determine if adjustments can be made, said Garcia.

Michelle L. Kaucic, community coordinator of the DOT’s Safety Education and Outreach, said the community needs to continue advocating for change and must also spread the word of not drinking and driving. The community and DOT need to work together to make the streets safe as possible, said Kaucic.

At the end of the march, participants held a moment of silence and a candlelight vigil honoring Olvin, Luis, Miguel and other victims, as family members spoke.

“Safe streets are not a luxury, it’s what we deserve,” said Councilmember Julissa Ferreras, who lost two of her best friends 20 years ago to a fatal traffic accident involving a drunk driver. “After losing several of our mothers, fathers, children and friends to fatal traffic collisions, we simply cannot tolerate to lose one more.”

 

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A Willets Point wish list for de Blasio


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

Photo by Thad Komorowski

THAD KOMOROWSKI

The $3 billion plan to transform Willets Point from a grungy haven for auto shops into a slick shopping mega center has sparked protests, petitions and even a hunger strike since the Bloomberg administration announced the project.

But opponents largely fell silent after the City Council voted to approve the plan on October 9. Now, they’re waiting to see what the incoming mayor might do.

Willets Point United, an organization that has protested the proposal since it was announced, has kept quiet in the wake of the Council’s decision. Normally updating its blog and Twitter feed with the frequency of a teenager, the group has been unresponsive to reporters’ calls and emails.

The silence has even extended to the group’s attorney Michael Rikon, who also represents business owners in Willets Points, located in the shadow of Citi Field.

“Maybe the organization is so exhausted from the fight that they would not come up to my office,” Rikon said. “They may be in a really bad bind. But I can’t represent an organization that won’t meet with its attorney.”

While Willets Point United may be quiet, resentment of the plan is alive and well among the affected business owners.

Arturo Olaya, proprietor of Arthur’s Auto Trim, said the city is displacing him and other Willets Point business owners without giving them enough money or understanding the area’s way of life.

“People here can’t pick up a business and move it,” Olaya said. “Willets Point grew up by itself with no help from the government. Now Bloomberg is just concerned with big business and wants to level everybody out.”

Queens residents are suffering from the redevelopment plan too, said Alan Gross, a Census Bureau field representative who lives in North Flushing.

“Those shops provide an important service to people in Queens, and I experienced that firsthand,” Gross said. “People can’t afford to go to the dealerships and get parts from part stores themselves.”

Locals say they would have preferred to improve the neighborhood in small ways. If simple sewage, street and gas repair were done, Rikon said, Willets Point would repair itself.

But John Choe, director of One Flushing Community Economic Development Center, said that smaller community needs getting abandoned in favor of large-scale development is a hallmark of the Bloomberg era.

“We have fallen by the wayside,” Choe said. “Maybe the next administration could do a better job addressing the needs of the surroundings here.”

Newly elected Mayor Bill de Blasio has not commented on the Willets Point redevelopment, and didn’t respond to inquiries.

The construction of the project’s mall is set for completion by the time of the next mayor’s second term or exit in 2018. Choe said locals can only hope Bloomberg’s successor will take the small communities’ needs seriously as the project progresses.

“We’re looking for more of a presence of the mayor, where they’re actually coming to the neighborhood besides in election time,” Choe said. “We’re hoping the next mayor will have a longer outlook of what’s going on here and an active interest in us.”

 

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Queens’ Morning Roundup


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

morning roundup

TODAY’S FORECAST

Thursday: Overcast with rain showers, then a chance of rain in the afternoon. High of 63. Breezy. Winds from the SW at 10 to 20 mph shifting to the WNW in the afternoon. Chance of rain 60%. Thursday night: Partly cloudy in the evening, then clear. Low of 41F. Breezy. Winds from the NW at 10 to 20 mph.

EVENT OF THE DAY: Romeo and Juliet

The Poetics Theatre Collective presents a unique staging of Shakespeare’s timeless love story Romeo and Juliet in an intimate setting at the Secret Theatre in Long Island City from Thursday, November 7 - Saturday, November 16. Click here for more info or to submit an event of your own

NYPD commissioner appointment in limbo after Bill de Blasio elected

The clock is ticking for the newly elected mayor to name a police commissioner — the first changing of the guard at the NYPD in 12 years. Read more: New York Daily News

Twitter sets IPO of $26 per share

Twitter late Wednesday set a price of $26 for its initial public offering of stock, which means the company’s shares can begin trading Thursday on the New York Stock Exchange. Read more: CBS New York/AP

Ray Kelly in the running for JPMorgan job

NYPD Commissioner Ray Kelly, unwanted by Mayor-elect Bill de Blasio, is in the running for a top security job at JPMorgan Chase, sources at the financial giant told The Post. Read more: New York Post

David Dinkins released from hospital

Former New York City Mayor David Dinkins has been released from the hospital after treatment for pneumonia. Read more: AP

Blockbuster Video to shut down remaining U.S. stores

Not so many years ago, a Blockbuster video store could be found in virtually every neighborhood in the city. Read more: CBS New York/AP

 

 

Newly elected mayor de Blasio meets with Bloomberg


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

New York’s next mayor met with the current mayor this morning at City Hall.

Hours after Bill de Blasio won Tuesday’s election in a landslide victory, he spoke with Mayor Michael Bloomberg in a private sit down, according to the AP.

De Blasio, addressing media at the steps of City Hall, said he “feels great,” reported the AP.

“All this, it’s incredible.” he added.

De Blasio also launched his transition website and Twitter handle @nyctransition today.

 

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De Blasio elected mayor in landslide


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photo by Lauren Epifanio

Bill de Blasio, in a landslide victory, has been elected as the city’s first Democratic mayor in two decades.

With 99 percent of the precincts reporting, de Blasio won Tuesday’s race with 73 percent of the vote, according to unofficial results. His Republican opponent, Joe Lhota, had 24 percent.

“Today, you spoke out loudly and clearly for a new direction for our city, united by a belief that our city should leave no New Yorker behind,” de Blasio said in his victory speech.

“Tackling inequality isn’t easy; it never has been and it never will be. The challenges we face have been decades in the making, and the problems we set out to address will not be solved overnight,” he added.

“But make no mistake: the people of this city have chosen a progressive path, and tonight we set forth on it, together, as one city.”

As far back as late June, polls still showed de Blasio, the city’s public advocate, finishing fourth in the Democratic primary.

City Council Speaker Christine Quinn was the early front-runner, but when former Congressmember Anthony Weiner entered the Democratic primary in May, her lead shrunk in the polls.

Weiner, however, soon faced another sexting scandal, and he lost favorability with voters.

In July, de Blasio started to gain in the polls, and took the lead away from Quinn the following month.

De Blasio’s surge in the polls coincided with the release of a campaign ad starring his teenage son Dante, whose Afro took center stage.

His momentum continued until the primary, where de Blasio beat second-place finisher, former City Comptroller Bill Thompson by a significant lead.

But, with de Blasio still hovering around the 40 percent threshold needed to avoid an October 1 runoff, Thompson would not concede on primary night.

Thompson dropped out of the race six days later, and in late September the Board of Elections certified de Blasio the official Democratic nominee with just over 40 percent.

Lhota, the ex-MTA chairman and former deputy mayor under Rudy Giuliani, easily secured the Republican nomination with 53 percent of the vote, topping grocery store mogul John Catsimatidis and Doe Fund founder George McDonald.

But Lhota’s success within his own party could not be replicated in the general election.

“We are five boroughs, but we are one city. We are one people and we want our city to move forward, not backwards. And I do hope our mayor-elect understands this before it’s too late,” said Lhota, conceding the race.

“It’s natural tonight to feel some disappointment. But tomorrow we must move beyond it. It was a good fight and it was a fight worth having,” he continued.

With a heavy Democratic electorate in the city, early on polls showed de Blasio beating Lhota by a wide margin.

The heated battle between the two and their different visions for the city were evident throughout the general election campaign and the three debates between the candidates, where they clashed on a range of issues, including taxes, education and crime.

Though Lhota promised a safer city under his watch, suggesting crime would go up under a de Blasio administration, voters ultimately favored de Blasio’s progressive message and saw him as a break from the Bloomberg years.

-With additional reporting by Meaghan McGoldrick

Updated 2:12 a.m. 

 

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Queens’ Morning Roundup


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

morning roundup

TODAY’S FORECAST

Monday: Partly cloudy. High of 48. Winds from the NE at 5 to 15 mph. Monday night: Overcast in the evening, then partly cloudy. Low of 41. Winds from the ENE at 5 to 10 mph

EVENT OF THE DAY:  Sunnyside Restaurant Week

The Sunnyside Shines Business Improvement District (BID) is holding its first-ever Sunnyside Restaurant Week from November 4 to 8. The five-day celebration will offer participants a “culinary journey through Sunnyside,” featuring special three course dinner menus for $25 at 17 participating local restaurants. Six of the 17 will also feature two course lunch menus for $10. Click here for more info or to submit an event of your own

NYC Marathon returns amid increased security; Mutai, Jeptoo of Kenya win titles

A year after it was canceled at the last minute by Hurricane Sandy, more than 50,000 runners participated in the 43rd running of the New York City Marathon, taking on the 26.2 miles through the five boroughs. Read more: NBC New York

Bill de Blasio, ahead in poll, dismisses Joe Lhota’s attacks on sleeping late

As a new poll showed his mayoral dreams slipping away, Joe Lhota launched a novel attack, charging that Bill de Blasio’s inability to get up in the morning shows he’s unfit to lead the city that never sleeps. Read more: New York Daily News

Barclays Center accused in lawsuit of mistreatment based on race

The Barclays Center has been accused of mistreating luxury box holders who are African-American. Read more: CBS New York

Lhota slams Harry Belafonte for ‘race baiting’ comments

Mayoral candidates Bill de Blasio and Joe Lhota each hit the campaign trail Sunday with several events around the city. Read more: CBS New York

Missing NYU student found trapped between wall of dorm, parking garage

A 19-year-old New York University student who went missing over the weekend was found trapped in a narrow gap between a dorm and a neighboring parking garage in lower Manhattan, where rescuers had to break through a wall Sunday night to free him. Read more: NBC New York

Gunman in LAX shooting told police he acted alone

The gunman accused of shooting employees and terrorizing travelers at Los Angeles International Airport accomplished two of his goals: kill a Transportation Security Administration officer and show how easy it is to get a gun into an airport. Read more: AP

The Queens Courier endorses Bill de Blasio for mayor


By Queens Courier Staff | editorial@queenscourier.com

File photo

The Queens Courier is pleased to endorse Democrat Bill de Blasio for mayor of New York.

Since taking office, de Blasio has stood for the interests of the middle and working classes, pushing for better public schools, protesting the closure of community hospitals, and generally advocating for a city government more responsive to the needs of outer borough residents.

So when you go to the polls, be sure to cast your vote for Bill de Blasio.

Federal court grants stay on stop-and-frisk decision


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

A federal court halted the decision that requires reforms to the NYPD’s controversial stop-and-frisk practice.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit granted a stay on District Judge Shira Scheindlin’s decision, while the city is appealing the ruling. The court also removed Scheindlin from the case.

Scheindlin originally ruled the policy unconstitutional in August, appointed lawyer Peter Zimroth to monitor the NYPD and ordered that officers wear body cameras.

“I find that the city is liable for violating plaintiffs’ Fourth and Fourteenth Amendment rights,” Scheindlin wrote. “The city acted with deliberate indifference toward the NYPD’s practice of making unconstitutional stops and conducting unconstitutional frisks.”

The city filed to appeal Scheindlin’s ruling a few days later, and mayor Bloomberg called her decision unfair.

“Throughout the trail that just concluded the judge made it clear that she was not at all interested in the crime reductions here [in the city] or how we achieved them,” Bloomberg said.

The appeals court decision has received split reaction from the mayoral candidates.

“I’m extremely disappointed in today’s decision,” said Democratic candidate Bill de Blasio. “We shouldn’t have to wait for reforms that both keep our communities safe and obey the Constitution. We have to end the overuse of stop-and-frisk–and any delay only means a continued and unnecessary rift between our police and the people they protect.”

His Republican opponent, Joe Lhota, touted the court’s decision.

“Bravo! As I have said all along, Judge Scheindlin’s biased conduct corrupted the case and her decision was not based on the facts,” Lhota said. “The ruling by the nation’s second highest court was an unprecedented rejection of both the result of the case and the manner with which it was achieved.”

 

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Political Roundup: De Blasio, Lhota face off in final debate


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

ROUNDUP

Mayoral candidates Bill de Blasio and Joe Lhota had their third and final debate Wednesday.

The debate was originally scheduled for Tuesday but was moved to last night in observance of the Sandy anniversary,

Questions about Sandy led off the debate, but the two once again battled over many of the same issues they did in the previous two debates, including education, crime and taxes.

A Quinnipiac University poll released the same day of the debate showed de Blasio still has as significant lead over Lhota in the race.

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City Council moving to take away speaker’s ‘pork’ power: New York Post

Senate blocks Obama picks for judge, housing posts: AP

Edward Snowden gets a job working in tech support for Russian website: lawyer: New York Daily News

 

Queens’ Morning Roundup


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

The Queens Morning Roundup logo.

TODAY’S FORECAST 

Wednesday: Overcast with rain. High of 57. Winds from the NNE at 5 to 10 mph. Chance of rain 80%. Wednesday night: Overcast in the evening, then partly cloudy. Low of 43. Winds from the NW at 10 to 15 mph.

EVENT OF THE DAY: Eric March: Cityscapes of Long Island City and Astoria

In Cityscapes of Long Island City and Astoria, an exhibit of paintings and drawings at the Greater Astoria Historical Society through November 17, Long Island City-based artist Eric March examines his local neighborhood to find the epic and the intimate in a new series of cityscapes of western Queens, from soaring bridges over the East River to private moments in a storefront. Click here for more info or to submit an event of your own

Lhota, de Blasio have heated second debate

Mayoral candidates Joe Lhota and Bill de Blasio once again battled in their second debate of the general election Tuesday night. Read more: The Queens Courier

Worker hurt during TV show filming in Queens: FDNY

An electrician working on the set of a television show being filmed in Queens had minor injuries when a lift he was on caught fire, the FDNY says. Read more: NBC New York

Manhattan food cart vendor charged in plot to torture Egyptian businessman

A Manhattan food cart vendor plotted to torture a prominent member of the city’s Egyptian-American business community but was pinched after the man he hired to do the gruesome work ratted him out, police sources said Tuesday. Read more: New York Daily News

Government shutdown causes IRS tax season delay

Here’s more fallout from the government’s partial shutdown: Early tax filers will have to wait an extra week or two to get tax refunds next year. Read more: AP

FDA: Over 3,600 pets sickened, 580 dead after eating jerky treats

More than 3,600 pets have gotten sick, and 580 have died, from jerky treats that were largely imported from China, the Food and Drug Administration said Tuesday. Read more: CBS New York

Survey: NY, NJ among sexiest accents in North America

Are the New Jersey and New York accents sexy? Yes, if you believe a survey released by a dating website called Cupid.com. Read more: Fox New York

Lhota, de Blasio have heated second debate


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

It was round two for mayoral candidates Joe Lhota and Bill de Blasio.

The two sparred over a range of issues during their second debate on Tuesday, including taxes and education, but some of the most heated exchanges came over crime and public safety.

Lhota, who received the backing of the Queens County Republican Party, brought up the fact that de Blasio served in the administration of Mayor David Dinkins—a period when there were 2,000 murders a year and “the last time we had a race riot in the city of New York.”

“He is actually bringing us backwards,” said Lhota.

Lhota, who disagrees with de Blasio over having an inspector general for the NYPD, said, “we cannot handcuff the police department.”

De Blasio said he believes in “a strong NYPD,” and “an independent inspector general is a smart form of check and balance to make sure we’re doing things right, to make sure that civil liberties and individual liberties are being recognized.”

Lhota already targeted his Democratic opponent on his weaknesses on crime in an ad released on Wednesday, October 16, which was brought up during the debate.

Calling the ad divisive, de Blasio said it was “race-baiting” and “fear-mongering.”

The ad shows scenes from the city’s higher-crime past and suggests crime will go up under a de Blasio administration.

“Don’t tell me I throw out the race card because there is nothing racial in there. And Bill, you cannot stoop that low and bring that up,” Lhota said, firing back at the charges at one point.

Lhota also blasted de Blasio over comments he made about Rudy Giuliani, whom Lhota worked for during both his terms as New York City mayor.

“I am getting sick and tired of you impugning the integrity of Rudy Giuliani,” Lhota said.

De Blasio and Lhota will meet for their next and final debate on Tuesday, October 29.

 

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De Blasio maintains wide lead in latest poll


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/File photos

The newest Quinnipiac University poll shows Democrat Bill de Blasio still has a commanding lead over his Republican opponent Joe Lhota in the mayor’s race.

The poll found that De Blasio tops Lhota 68 to 24 percent among likely voters. Independence candidate Adolfo Carrion received 2 percent in the survey.

Lhota improved slightly since the last Quinnipiac University poll, released on October 3, which showed de Blasio with a 71 to 21 percent lead over him.

But with only two weeks to go until Election Day, the poll also found that only 5 percent of likely voters are still undecided. Eight percent of voters who named a candidate said there’s a “good chance” they will change their mind by November 5.

“The good news for Public Advocate Bill de Blasio is that he probably can start drafting is inauguration speech,” said Maurice Carroll, director of the Quinnipiac University Polling  Institute.

“The bad news is that New York City voters’ priority for the next mayor is – you guessed it – jobs, something over which a mayor has very little control. The next priority is education and if he can succeed where so many have not, they can name a school after him.”

According to the poll, released Monday, 32 percent of likely voters said creating jobs is the top priority for the next mayor, followed by education at 24 percent, keeping crime rates low at 20 percent and reducing the gap between the rich and poor at 18 percent.

The poll, conducted from October 16 to 20, surveyed 973 likely voters and had a margin of error of plus and minus 3.1 percentage points.

On October 15, de Blasio and Lhota faced each other in their first general election mayoral debate. The following day, Lhota released a new campaign ad highlighting his Democratic opponent’s “weak positions on crime.”

 

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Queens’ Morning Roundup


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

The Queens Morning Roundup logo.

TODAY’S FORECAST

Tuesday: Overcast. High of 68. Winds from the West at 10 to 15 mph. Tuesday night: Partly cloudy with a chance of rain after midnight. Low of 48. Winds from the NW at 5 to 10 mph shifting to the North after midnight. Chance of rain 50%.

EVENT OF THE DAY: Quality-of-Life Town Hall with Assemblymemeber Francisco Moya and the Jackson Heights Green Alliance

Assemblymember Francisco Moya and the Jackson Heights Green Alliance will host a Town Hall featuring a panel comprised of representatives from an array of city agencies, state agencies and community groups. The event will provide Jackson Heights residents with the opportunity to address these representatives on a wide range of issues and discuss ways in which quality of life in the community can be improved. Click here for more info or to submit an event of your own

Joe Lhota, Bill de Blasio square off in 2nd NYC mayoral debate

Facing a massive deficit in the polls, Joe Lhota plans to be on the attack in the second New York City mayoral debate, which doubles as one of his last chances to start a comeback that could topple front-runner Bill de Blasio. Read more: NBC New York

MTA considers bendable trains that connect without interior doors, making it easier to find a seat

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Mayor Michael Bloomberg wins ‘Jewish Nobel’ prize

Israel on Monday recognized New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg as the first recipient of the $1 million Genesis Prize, an award popularly dubbed the “Jewish Nobel Prize.” Read more: Fox New York

Builders of Obama’s health website saw red flags

Crammed into conference rooms with pizza for dinner, some programmers building the Obama administration’s showcase health insurance website were growing increasingly stressed. Read more: AP

De Blasio, Lhota face off in their first general election debate


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

File photos

Mayoral opponents Bill de Blasio and Joe Lhota met in their first debate of the general election Tuesday night.

De Blasio, the Democratic candidate and front-runner, spent much of the Tuesday, October 15 televised debate trying to tie Lhota to national Republicans and the Tea Party.

“I think Mr. Lhota should be straight up with us about the fact that he does subscribe to the views of the national Republican Party,” said de Blasio, who mentioned Lhota’s attendance at a Staten Island Tea Party event and support of delaying Obamacare for a year.

“Don’t lump me in with people who I’m constantly in disagreement with,” said Lhota, defending himself at one point.

Lhota, who was deputy mayor under Mayor Rudy Giuliani and headed up the MTA, took aim at de Blasio by saying he has the direct management experience to be mayor.

“I can be mayor on day one without any training, without any learning curve whatsoever, said Lhota.

Though both candidates expressed a desire to change the direction of the city and agreed on some basic points, including creating more affordable housing, they were divided on many of the issues.

Among the topics covered were charter schools, crime and stop-and-frisk, the government shutdown, job creation and narrowing the income gap.

De Blasio spoke about his “Tale of Two Cites,” saying 46 percent of residents are living at or near the poverty the level, and his desire to tax the wealthy. He wants to use the tax increase to expand after-school programs and create universal pre-K.

Lhota called de Blasio a typical “career politician” who says he’s going to raise taxes on the wealthy, but will end up also raising them on the middle class. Lhota added that de Blasio voting twice to increase property taxes when he was on the City Council and other parts of his record were proof of him “going back and taking money away from the middle class.”

The two candidates will debate again on October 22 and 29.

 

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Queens’ Morning Roundup


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

morning roundup

TODAY’S FORECAST

Tuesday: Partly cloudy. High of 72. Winds from the ENE at 5 to 10 mph. Tuesday night: Mostly cloudy. Low of 61. Winds from the SE at 5 to 10 mph.

EVENT OF THE DAY: Louis Armstrong House Museum’s 10-Year Anniversary Bash

The Louis Armstrong House Museum celebrates its 10-year anniversary at 6 p.m. with a really hot program. It includes a special performance by The Hot Sardines and Creole creations based on Louis’s own recipes prepared by The Cooking Channel’s Tamara Reynolds and her company, Van Alst Kitchen; and, if that wasn’t hot enough, the museum will unveil Louis Armstrong’s Life Mask, which has recently been restored and will be on display for the first time in the Museum’s history. Click here for more info or to submit an event of your own

Bill de Blasio, Joe Lhota to square off in New York City mayoral debate

The two leading candidates for New York City mayor will square off for their first debate, potentially giving underdog Joe Lhota his best chance to reverse the fortunes of his struggling campaign Read more: NBC New York

Supermarket cleanliness report

An examination of reports by the NYS Dept. of Agriculture and Markets shows that over the last five years there were serious cleanliness concerns at supermarkets across New York City. Read more: Fox New York

Officials: Terror suspect wanted for role in U.S. embassy bombings awaiting arraignment in Manhattan

After a weeklong interrogation aboard a U.S. warship, a Libyan al Qaeda suspect is now in New York awaiting trial on terrorism charges, U.S. officials said Monday. Read more: CBS New York

Police union sues New York City Council over profiling law

New York City’s police union is suing city council over a law that makes it easier to file bias-based profiling claims against officers,  the union said Tuesday. Read more: NBC New York

U.S. senators hint at possible fiscal deal on Tuesday
A month of combat in the U.S. Congress over government spending showed signs on Monday of giving way to a Senate deal to reopen shuttered federal agencies and prevent an economically damaging default on federal debt. Read more: Reuters