Tag Archives: Bellerose

SUV hits, kills pedestrian in Bellerose


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

An early morning accident in Bellerose Saturday left a pedestrian dead, police said.

A 2011 Ford Expedition struck an unidentified male about 6:50 a.m. near the Cross Island Parkway and Union Turnpike, according to the NYPD.

He was taken to North Shore-LIJ where he was pronounced dead, police said.

The 69-year-old driver remained on the scene and the NYPD’s Highway Patrol Collision Investigation Squad is investigating, police said.

 

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City Council candidate Joe Concannon calls ‘fraud’ on Campaign Finance Board


| mchan@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Joe Concannon’s campaign

The retired police captain running a pointed City Council bid against a popular incumbent says the city’s Campaign Finance Board should have accommodated his late entrance into the race.

Joe Concannon, who is taking on Councilmember Mark Weprin in a general election next month, said he was a “victim” of the CFB’s “incompetence and fraud” when his profile did not appear in the board’s widely distributed voter guide.

“I am running for public office to ensure that New York City government is more transparent and to alleviate the corruption, fraud and mismanagement,” said Concannon, who is on the Reform and Independent line. “The CFB seems to have succumbed to all three.”

About 4 million copies of the nonpartisan newsletter were mailed out throughout the city this week, a CFB spokesperson said. The guide contains voting information and detailed profiles submitted by candidates.

CFB spokesperson Matt Sollars said the hopefuls have until early July, at the latest, to submit their profiles, which then go through a timely process of getting translated into five languages in Queens.

“These are reasonable deadlines that are necessary for us to collect and produce a voter guide that is printed and mailed to every registered voter in New York City,” he said.

Concannon did not register with the CFB until September, Sollars said, months after the submission deadline.

But Phil Orenstein, the candidate’s campaign manager, said there should have been an exception, or at least an addendum.

“Accommodations should be made for his independent line candidacy, but nothing of the sort was done,” he said. “To us, this smacks of voter fraud and we hold the CFB culpable. They have failed in their responsibilities to properly inform the voters.”

Concannon leaped into the race August 8 because Weprin voted in support of two controversial police oversight bills in the Community Safety Act.

Concannon said the bills would increase crime and handcuff police, a belief numerous police unions shared when they endorsed him.

The Bellerose candidate unsuccessfully tried to unseat State Senator Tony Avella last year.

 

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Hate Crimes unit investigating after Bellerose cars tagged with swastikas


| mchan@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photos by Melissa Chan

Bellerose residents whose cars were vandalized with graffiti were able to wash off the spray paint — but not the hateful message it left behind.

Fourteen cars in the quiet residential area were marked up during an early morning graffiti spree on October 11, police said.

Silver-painted swastikas were found on half of the vehicles around 87th Avenue and 256th Street, according to police. Residents said other cars were tagged with lines and random scribbles.

“I was very surprised,” said Devinder Chahal, whose white BMW was vandalized. “We saw all the other cars were painted. It’s a little scary.”

Chahal said she woke up at 5:30 a.m. to find four of her family’s cars, including her husband’s yellow city cab, sprawled along the sides and on the hoods with graffiti.

They were mostly squiggles, she said, but many down the street were hit with the Nazi symbol.

“Right now, the way it looks, it could be a hate crime,” Chahal said. “We’re concerned about the future. Today, they painted the cars. Tomorrow, it could be anything.”

Helicopters circled above the neighborhood Friday as law enforcement officials went up and down the roped off streets gathering evidence off cars.

“This has never happened before,” said Parveen Kumar, another victim of the vandalism. “I don’t know what happened.”

Chahal said the stubborn paint came off after “a lot of work,” following a full day’s investigation.

It was unclear if more than one person was suspected of the crimes. An investigation by the NYPD’s Hate Crimes Task Force is ongoing, a police spokesperson said.

“This is a despicable act of vandalism,” said State Senator Tony Avella, “and those responsible for this heinous crime should be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law, including being possibly charged with a hate crime.”

Resident Daljit Kaur said she feared the culprit — or multiple offenders — could be capable of worse.

“Who knows what else they’ll do? It’s dangerous,” she said.

 

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Councilmember Mark Weprin faces potential challenger in general election


| mchan@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of Joseph Concannon’s campaign

Numerous police unions are backing one candidate’s bid to unseat incumbent Councilmember Mark Weprin.

Joseph Concannon, a retired police captain from Bellerose, announced his run for City Council on August 8 — with the full support of several law enforcement groups, including the Patrolmen’s Benevolent Association (PBA).

“I can assure you I will never risk the safety and security of one New York City citizen at any time at all,” Concannon said.

The PBA pledged in June to invest its full resources to target councilmembers, including Weprin, who voted in favor of the Community Safety Act. The union distributed anti-Weprin leaflets in Bayside in July.

“No councilmember who puts this city at risk will have a free ride in the next election,” PBA president Patrick Lynch said.

Two oversight bills in the act would create an inspector general to oversee the NYPD and allow individuals to sue the city in state court over the NYPD’s stop-and-frisk practices.

The PBA and Concannon said the bills would increase crime and handcuff police.

“I didn’t pick this fight. I didn’t ask for this challenge,” Concannon said. “I’m afraid that Mark Weprin and all the members have come to this with a very faint heart. They don’t understand the reach of this bill and what it will do to police officers we send out into the street.”

Concannon is planning to make the Reform Party line. He ran for State Senate as a Republican last year and lost to incumbent Tony Avella.

The Detectives Endowment Association, Lieutenants Benevolent Association, Sergeants Benevolent Association and Captains Endowment Association have also endorsed his candidacy.

Weprin stood by his vote, saying the bills would keep the city safe without leading to an increase in lawsuits since there is no monetary incentive.

“Everyone has the right to run,” he said. “I know Joe a little bit. I respect his service to our country and city. I just think that the law is in the best interest of New York City.”

If Concannon collects the 450 petition signatures he needs to make the ballot by August 20, he will face off with Weprin in the November general election.

“The voters will decide in the election,” Weprin said. “Having no opponent would be better, but this is democracy and democracy will run its course.”

 

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Queens has most immigrant seniors in city: report


| mchan@queenscourier.com

Queens has the largest number of immigrant seniors in the city, with Flushing leading the list of neighborhoods, according to a new report.

The borough is home to about 162,000 foreign-born people over the age of 65, says a study by the Center for an Urban Future. The report shows more than 25,000 live in Flushing.

“Immigrants are critical to Queens,” said Jonathan Bowles, executive director of the New York-based think tank.

“They’ve driven a lot of the economic growth in the borough,” he said. “They make up almost half of the population in Queens. It’s important that they can grow old in the city.”

Droves of immigrants, mostly from Asia, first made their way to Flushing in the 1970s, Bowles said.

Since then, many more have moved from Manhattan’s Chinatown to the northern Queens neighborhood for a more affordable way of life that is surrounded by immigrant services. In the last decade, more than 8,000 immigrant seniors have settled in Flushing, according to the report.

“They want to live in Flushing because it’s more convenient for them in terms of language barriers,” said Kathy Liu, program director for the Flushing YMCA’s New Americans Welcome Center. “It’s one of the neighborhoods which allow immigrants to go to different agencies to help them in their language.”

The center is a one-stop shop for non-English speakers and one of many locations where immigrants can receive for free literacy, citizen preparation, job readiness and computer classes year-round. The facility sees natives from China, Korea and even France, Liu said.

The Flushing branch of the Queens Library, which offers similar services, is the most heavily used branch in the state, said Queens Library spokesperson Joanne King.

Still, the report shows immigrant seniors face a number of challenges, including a higher poverty rate. They are also less likely to receive government benefits.

“Many don’t qualify for retirement or housing benefits,” Liu said. “With rent so high in this area, they find it very difficult to live with the savings they brought from their own country.”

According to the report, Flushing has the highest concentration of poor seniors. More than half of all Korean seniors in the city who are below the federal poverty line live in Flushing, the study found.

The Rockaways had the second largest group of poor immigrant seniors, 3,154 people.

“Immigrant adults have all of those traditional challenges, but then they have additional ones because of language barriers or a lack of familiarity with programs and services that are available,” Bowles said. “I don’t see this as a problem necessarily, but as a challenge that New York City policy makers have to plan for.”

Some other highlights:

  • Bellerose, Rosedale, Forest Hills and Rego Park, trailing slightly behind Flushing, also made the list.
  • Howard Beach and South Ozone Park had the largest change in their immigrant senior population. They saw a 112 percent jump, which amounts to nearly 5,000 seniors.
  •  Over the last decade, the number of immigrant seniors in Queens increased by 42,000, while the number of native-born seniors dropped by nearly 41,000.



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Bellerose residents demand mosquito help after years with no West Nile spraying


| mchan@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of CDC

Bellerose residents say they live in a forgotten land when it comes to the city’s efforts to eliminate mosquitoes.

“You can’t go outside. You can’t make it from your car to your front door,” said Maria Donza.

The bloodsuckers are keeping residents on house arrest and even alert indoors, said Donza, who added she sits with a bottle of bug spray at home.

The city has not sprayed the area since before 2011.

Pesticide was scheduled for Bellerose in August 2011, but the order was eventually canceled, according to the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s (DOHMH) website.

The department recently targeted neighborhoods north of Bellerose, spraying parts of Bayside, Douglaston, Douglaston Manor, Glen Oaks, Little Neck and Oakland Gardens on July 25 and early the next day.

“Everywhere else in Queens has been mostly getting sprayed,” said resident AJ Sonnick. “I don’t understand why Bellerose has been forgotten.”

The 20-year-old said he was bitten four times in the 20 minutes he was in his backyard the other day.

“This is a beautiful neighborhood. It’s a great neighborhood to live,” Sonnick said. “It’s a shame that we just can’t sit outside.”

A DOHMH spokesperson said Bellerose has not been sprayed because no West Nile Virus activity has been detected there.

The virus is spread to humans through the bite of an infected mosquito. It can cause encephalitis and meningitis.

Insects carrying the potentially fatal virus were recently found in Auburndale, College Point, Holliswood, Middle Village, Pomonok and the areas north of Bellerose sprayed last week.

The pesticide is taken as a last resort in areas where there is a high risk of West Nile Virus transmission, the department said.

Catch basins in Bellerose have been treated with larvicide twice this season.

“Though there may be an increase in floodwater mosquitoes citywide, these mosquitoes do not transmit West Nile Virus,” the DOHMH spokesperson said.

However, State Senator Tony Avella said the city should take measures before Bellerose makes the infected list.

“Every year, we have deaths from West Nile Virus. Every year, it resurfaces,” he said. “So why don’t we do a much more proactive spraying to reduce that population rather than wait until it explodes on us?”

Mosquitoes “don’t know what a boundary is on a map” and can fly into new nearby territories, the legislator added.

The city urged residents to call 3-1-1 to report standing water, which can be a breeding ground for mosquitoes.

 

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10 years after deadly staged accident, family wants Alice’s Law passed


| mchan@queenscourier.com

THE COURIER/Photo by Melissa Chan

The family of the 71-year-old Queens woman killed 10 years ago in a staged car accident said bureaucratic delays have held up justice — and a proposed law to stiffen penalties in such cases.

“It should have passed,” said Daniel Ross, 56, of Bayside. “I don’t want another family to go through what we went through.”

His mother, Alice Ross, died in 2003 when her car was struck in Bellerose by another vehicle.

According to the district attorney, Waurd Demolaire of Brooklyn intentionally rammed his car into hers to collect insurance money under the state’s No-Fault Law. He was convicted of manslaughter and conspiracy in 2006 and released on probation last October.

“The perpetrator got off with a very reduced sentence, considering the fact that he murdered my sister,” said Alice’s brother, Don Peters. “Now he’s free to walk the streets of New York again.”

Legislation dubbed Alice’s Law has been proposed in the State Senate and Assembly. Both bills would impose tougher criminal penalties on people who engage in staged accidents. But legislators said failure to compromise on two different versions of the law has stalled the ratification process.

The Assembly wants to classify staging accidents to defraud insurance as a class E felony, the lowest felony offense. It carries a prison sentence of one to five years.

A bill passed in the State Senate would make the crime a class D felony and upgrade it to class B if the accident causes serious injury or death to another person. That could mean a prison sentence of five to more than 25 years.

“It’s continually frustrating that there seems to be a philosophical difference between the State Senate and Assembly,” said State Senator Tony Avella, a cosponsor of the Senate bill. “Increasing penalties for any sort of crime, [the Assembly] just won’t do it.”

Assemblymember David Weprin, a sponsor of the bill in the lower house, said he is optimistic that both houses will reach a compromise and get the legislation passed this year.

The legislature has less than one month to resolve differences and get one bill approved in both houses before the session ends June 20.

Last year, the State Senate passed its bill in March and sent it to the Assembly. But according to records, the Assembly’s amended bill reached the Senate on June 19 — too late for action by the upper house.

Alice’s Law was first proposed in 2007 and has been reintroduced every year since 2010.

“It’s been too long in coming,” said Peters, 78, of Saratoga Springs. “The process has been much too slow. I wish it would become law. I think it would be a very appropriate recognition of that anniversary.”

Daniel Ross showed The Courier a copy of a letter from authorities saying the man responsible for his mother’s untimely death was now free.

“That was murder,” he said. “It could have been anybody’s mother.”

 

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Queens teen takes on intolerance


| mhayes@queenscourier.com

Photo by David Marmor

After only six months, Maryam Farooq has made a bigger impact on her high school than most students make in four years, said her principal.

Farooq, 15, began work with the Anti-Defamation League (ADL), a group focused on anti-bullying and anti-hate awareness and education, when she was in the eighth grade. She worked on bringing ADL’s program, No Place for Hate, first to her middle school, and now to the Queens High School for Sciences at York College (QHSSYC).

“I saw what was going on around me, I saw friends hurting themselves,” said Farooq. “People don’t have the resources to help themselves; once I was given the resource [the ADL], I ran with it.”

Farooq successfully secured a grant from the ADL to train 20 QHSSYC students to be peer trainers, focusing on anti-bullying and conducting anti-bias workshops.

“She’s the most mature freshman that I’ve ever met,” said her principal, David Marmor. “She is the most conscientious, the most socially-aware, the most concerned about her peers.”

For her dedication to the ADL’s mission and leadership within her school, Farooq has received the Alexander Bodini Prize for Diversity as well as the Hasbro Community Action Hero award, and was also recognized on the White House blog.

“Seeing that people saw my effort and it was rewarded motivated me even more,” she said. “I first thought it was just someone’s duty to take charge, but to see that people recognize my efforts, it makes me not want to stop working.”

Outside of her hard work with the ADL, the Bellerose native enjoys spending time with her family, cooking and baking. She’s very focused on school, and is interested in biology. In the future, she plans to go into the medical field, possibly as a doctor.

For now, she plans on continuing her work with the ADL and No Place for Hate. She said that she hopes to expand the program, and bring bullying awareness to its highest level.

 

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Teen crashes into Queens school bus, charged with driving while consuming alcohol


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

A 17-year-old crashed into a school bus full of students this morning in Bellerose, and arrested for driving without a license and operating a vehicle while consuming alcohol, said police and the district attorney’s office.

Mandip Singh was also charged with leaving the scene of an accident with injuries.

The incident occurred around 7:45 a.m. at 83rd Avenue and Little Neck Parkway, said police.

According to the mother of a female student riding the bus, the vehicle was a small yellow school bus heading to P.S. 221. She also said that the children were taken to North Shore-LIJ Hospital as a precaution, but there were no serious injuries.

 

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Queens’ Morning Roundup


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

TODAY’S FORECAST

Friday: Partly cloudy. High of 84. Winds from the SSW at 5 to 15 mph. Friday night: Partly cloudy with a chance of rain after midnight. Low of 73. Winds from the South at 5 to 15 mph. Chance of rain 20%.

EVENT of the DAY: First Fridays, Summer in the Garden

The Noguchi Museum continues its summer practice of extending hours and offering free admission on the first Friday of the month. Visitors can explore the galleries and enjoy a cash bar in the outdoor sculpture garden. This Friday will feature Center of Attention, an extended conversation around a single work in the collection at 6 pm, followed at 7 pm by the film “My Playground,” a documentary about movement, tricking, freerunning, and parkour –a sport in which participants go from one city to another as quickly and efficiently as possible. Click here for more info or to submit an event of your own

Some Queens residents call on city to spray for West Nile Virus

Residents of eastern Queens are calling on the city to take a more active role in combating West Nile Virus in their neighborhoods. Read more: CBS New York

Queens gas station attendant beats drunk man to death for vandalizing cash machine

There was another killing at a New York City gas station on Thursday, but this time the victim was a drunk who made the mistake of tangling with an attendant who boxes and idolizes Rocky Balboa. Read more: New York Daily News

Vacant lot in Queens used as a trash heap

A massive mound of garbage that looks like it belongs in a landfill fills a residential lot in Jamaica, Queens. “It’s just a dumping ground. The rats have increased, the rodents,” says neighbor Crystal Bonds. Read more: NY1

Undrafted Queens product Machado signs with Rockets

Scott Machado, the former Iona College point guard who went undrafted despite leading the nation in assists, agreed to a partially guaranteed, three-year contract for the league minimum with the Houston Rockets Wednesday night, he told The Post. Read more: New York Post

FDNY adds nine Names to 9/11 Memorial Wall

The Fire Department added nine names Thursday to the memorial wall for deaths related to World Trade Center illnesses. Read more: NY1

Obama makes case for 2nd Term: ‘Harder’ path to ‘better place’

President Obama accepted the Democratic nomination for a second term on Thursday night, making a forceful argument that he had rescued the economy from disaster and ushered in a recovery that would be imperiled by a return to Republican stewardship. Read more: New York Times

Market milestone: Stocks return to late 2007 level

he last time the stock market was this high, the Great Recession had just started, and stocks were pointed toward a headlong descent. Read more: AP

Despite criticism, local members say unions still needed


| ctumola@queenscourier.com

Photo courtesy of NYC District Council of Carpenters

For those alive today it’s difficult to imagine the American workforce without unions. They not only represent trades, such as brick layers and electrical workers, and teachers, but there are also unions for actors, postal workers, air traffic controllers and many other professions.

But many question their role in the workplace. They say years ago unions were necessary because there were few laws that protected employees. Others, however, say they are still needed to protect workers’ rights.

One of the most famous unions is the International Brotherhood of Teamsters. Founded in 1903, it is one of the world’s largest unions, with 1.4 million members. As it says on the Teamster website, it represents “everyone from A to Z – from airline pilots to zookeepers.” Some other industries that have members in the union include food processing, rail, freight, and motion picture and theatrical trade.

According to the Teamsters Constitution, the union’s main purpose is to educate and organize workers so they can have a better standard of living and have a voice in the workplace.

John Sagona, 45, of Ozone Park, is a 25-year member of the union. He is also a second generation Teamster. His father was in Local 553 from the early 60s until the mid-80s. Sagona has been a member of the same Local, which represents workers in New York City, Long Island and Westchester County, since he began driving fuel oil delivery trucks for Petro.

Whether or not his father was a former member, he still would have joined the Teamsters, said Sagona.

“The unions can protect you,” he said.

That protection includes making sure members have medical benefits, pensions and paid vacations.

Unions are beneficial for both employees and bosses because benefits and better pay means harder, more dedicated workers, said Sagona.

Health insurance is a major reason that father of two Joseph Reilly, 45, of Bellerose, is a member of the New York City District Council of Carpenters, a regional council of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters. Reily is a 13-year member of Local 45, which covers Queens and some of Nassau County. He is also recording secretary of Local 45’ s executive board. Previously he was in the Teamsters electrical union.

When I didn’t work union I had no benefits,” he said. “I just saw the benefits the union members were getting and [they] didn’t compare to non-union,” he continued.

Those benefits follow him to each job whether it’s doing sheet rocking and framing at a school or installing cabinets, said Reily.

One union criticism that he has heard is that they are anti-American, but unions are part of America’s roots, he said.

The 13 colonies under British rule were like workers before unions, said Reilly, but then they united and fought for their rights.

Queens’ Morning Roundup


| lguerre@queenscourier.com

Stabbed MTA officer leaves hospital, eager to return to the job

A wounded Metropolitan Transportation Authority police officer was released from the hospital and headed home Thursday, one day after he was stabbed in the eye during a confrontation in Jamaica, Queens. Dozens of MTA and city police officers were on hand to applaud at Jamaica Hospital as Officer John Barnett was brought out in a wheelchair, with a hat pulled down over his eyes. Read more: [NY1] 

Four-alarm fire sweeps through Queens residential street 

More than a dozen firefighters sustained minor injuries battling a four-alarm fire in South Richmond Hill, Queens on Thursday. It started in a house on 112th Street on Thursday afternoon and spread to the surrounding houses. Authorities say about 175 firefighters worked for an hour and 20 minutes to extinguish the flames. Read more: [NY1]

Queens lifeguard Emily Harms hailed as hero after rescuing 11-year-old from drowning

She is 21 years old, looks more like a teenager and is hardly your typical vision of the heroic lifeguard. But Emily Harms from Bellerose, Queens is all that and more. An 11-year-old boy might not be alive if not for her heroism. CBS 2′s Scott Rapoport spoke with her Thursday and heard the remarkable story. Read more: [1010wins] 

‘Transfer’ schools offer at-risk students a chance to graduate 

For some Queens high school graduates this year, the commencement ceremony represents achieving the previously impossible. But the special schools that made it happen often are tarred with bad marks due to federal standards that overlook their value, school administrators and education experts say. Ryan Rodriguez, 19, of Corona, attributes his success to North Queens Community High School — what is known as a “transfer” school, which takes students who are at risk of aging out of regular high schools. Read more: [New York Daily News] 

Danielle Thomas Update: Ky. wake for Qns. executive 

Hundreds of mourners packed a Kentucky church yesterday to mourn a “small-town girl’’ who came to New York with big dreams, only to be murdered — allegedly by her lawyer boyfriend in Queens. Some 800 friends and family members wept as they filed into Centenary Methodist Church and surrounded the closed casket holding Weight Watchers executive Danielle Thomas. Read more: [New York Post] 

Scaffolding that malfunctioned in Queens wasn’t sanctioned 

The scaffolding that malfunctioned on Monday in Sunnyside leaving a worker dangling for dear life was not sanctioned, the Daily News has learned. The incident underscores a dark underbelly within the construction trade, a Queens lawmaker said Thursday. The city Department of Buildings issued a partial stop-work order at the 45th St. construction site and is investigating what caused the scaffolding to collapse, officials said. Read more: [New York Daily News] 

 

Queens communities facing brownouts


| brennison@queenscourier.com

Several Queens communities face a voltage reduction from Con Edison due to electrical equipment problems.

The 100 degree heat has many residents blasting air conditioners to stay cool.

Con Ed said the neighborhoods affected will have a 5 percent voltage reduction.  This was done in an effort to prevent a significant outage, a spokesperson from the company said.

There are about 20 individual  outages in Queens right now according to Con Edison’s outage map.

The reduction will occur in Bellerose, Cambria Heights, Floral Park, Forest Hills, Glendale, Glen Oaks, Hollis, Jamaica, Jamaica Hills, Laurelton, Middle Village, Queens Village, South Jamaica, Springfield Gardens and St. Albans.

Con Edison asked customers in these areas to conserve electricity and turn off nonessential electric equipment, such as TVs, computers, air conditioners, washers, dryers, and microwaves.

To report power outages or service problems visit www.conEd.com or call 800-75-CONED (6633). When reporting an outage, customers should have their Con Edison account number available, if possible, and report whether their neighbors also have lost power.

 

Student sold psychedelic sweets


| aaltman@queenscourier.com

An impromptu bake sale at a Queens middle school had students tripping and teachers flipping.

Twenty students at Intermediate School 208 in Bellerose were caught snacking and getting stoned on marijuana-infused brownies, provided by a fellow student who was selling the goods during school.

An eight-grade female whose identify was withheld because of her age, was allegedly responsible for distributing the psychedelic sweets. Her plan went up in smoke when the dean heard about the underground brownie business.

“This was a troubling incident,” said Department of Education representative Marge Feinberg. “As soon as the school learned about it they reported it to us and reached out to the parents of the students involved.”

Feinberg was unsure of exactly how much dough the student made. According to Feinberg, parents were notified and the students involved are now facing repercussions.

“We are bringing in a counselor to speak to the school community about substance abuse and prevention, and the students involved will face a disciplinary hearing,” said Feinberg.

According to the NYPD,police investigated the situation but no arrests were made due to a lack of evidence.

Officials from I.S. 208 denied comment on the situation as of press time.

Police seek missing Queens man


| brennison@queenscourier.com

missing 105 pct 2

Police are asking for the public’s help in finding a man that went missing in Bellerose recently.

Winston Nunez was last seen at 8 p.m. on Friday, December 2 near Winchester Boulevard.

Nunez, 40, is 5-feet-6-inches tall, 138-pounds with a dark complexion, brown eyes and a beard.

Anyone with information is asked to call Crime stoppers at 1-800-577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the Crime stoppers website at WWW.NYPDCRIMESTOPPERS.COM or by texting their tips to 274637 (CRIMES) then enter TIP577.